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  #101  
Old 09-22-2008, 11:56 PM
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cheesepaws cheesepaws is offline
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Re: Damien Hirst auction

Finally!...food metaphors.
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  #102  
Old 09-23-2008, 12:18 AM
grommet grommet is offline
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Re: Damien Hirst auction

no metaphors, just chips. So would yours be the sour cream-cheddar???
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  #103  
Old 09-23-2008, 05:41 AM
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evaldart evaldart is offline
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Re: Damien Hirst auction

Yeah, cheese, no metaphors...this is breaking news. They got Extreme Dill in those Pringles too, now. But nothing accompanies a few midday tuna sandwiches like jalapeno-nacho.
Pringles are very much like some Art out there: Conceptually driven, lacking in substance, never touched by human hands during production, "artificial" as opposed to authentic, one chip looks and feels exactly like every other one, widely embraced by "snackers" everywhere by the celebrated and anticipated introductions of new "flavors"...but we should be grateful for the price; if they were 10,000 dollars a can instead of two, only the Saatchis and a few busier busybodies would be able to eat them.

Theres your metaphor Cheese.
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  #104  
Old 09-23-2008, 09:40 AM
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StevenW StevenW is offline
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Re: Damien Hirst auction

That does it, I'm convinced.. Matt's just pulled the pringle from the stone.

Kneel sir Eval. "In the name of saint tuna, saint peanut butter and saint Jelly , I dub thee King.
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  #105  
Old 09-23-2008, 02:18 PM
cooljamesx1 cooljamesx1 is offline
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Re: Damien Hirst auction

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Originally Posted by evaldart View Post
Pringles are very much like some Art out there: Conceptually driven, lacking in substance, never touched by human hands during production, "artificial" as opposed to authentic, one chip looks and feels exactly like every other one,
are boulder chips less conceptual?
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  #106  
Old 09-23-2008, 02:21 PM
cooljamesx1 cooljamesx1 is offline
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Re: Damien Hirst auction

you used the word like. doesn't that make it a simile anyways? your metaphors are LIKE pringles. don't actually contain potatoes.
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  #107  
Old 09-24-2008, 09:42 AM
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Blake Blake is offline
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Re: Damien Hirst auction

It appears that the auction was a scam
Blake

From The Sunday Times
September 21, 2008
Hirst dealers bolster prices at record sale
DAMIEN HIRST’S own dealers propped up prices at his record-breaking art auction at Sotheby’s with estimated bids and purchases of £40m.

Three of his closest business associates, who have an interest in maintaining the high value of his work, made bids or purchases accounting for more than half of the £70.5m spent on the crucial opening day of the sale.

Hirst was selling 223 new pieces, which had been made for him at his six studios in the past two years
The sale smashed the previous record for takings from a single artist sale at Sotheby’s by a factor of 10 and took place as financial markets went into freefall on Monday, the day Lehman Brothers declared its bankruptcy.

Hirst had claimed that the auction was a way to break free from his dealers, saying: “I was indoctrinated by the gallery system — that you don’t do auctions. If you don’t like the rules, change the rules.”

Rumours are circulating in the art world that, in fact, it was only thanks to the dealers that he was able to defy gravity.

One leading collector, who asked not to be named, said: “Nothing can convince me that on the very day banks were collapsing around us, collectors were buying these works at Sotheby’s. I don’t care how rich you are or where you’re from. When it looks like the world is going under, nobody buys.”

Another high-profile collector, who also asked not to be named, said: “The Damien Hirst industry is a skilfully managed market. It would be in a lot of people’s interest to make sure this sale worked.”

Modern art auctions are highly secretive. The auction houses protect the names of buyers and many bids are made through proxies or by telephone.

The Sunday Times has acquired a list compiled by three saleroom correspondents who attended the auction. They took a note of the winning bidder and the second highest, known as the “under-bidder”.

The list shows that a substantial role was played by Jay Jopling, Hirst’s long-standing friend and dealer. Jopling, the son of a former Conservative minister who established the White Cube as one of London’s best known galleries, bought £7.2m of artworks in the sale.

Jopling arguably made more significant interventions with some of the lots that he did not buy. According to the watching journalists, he was one of the highest bidders for The Kingdom, a tiger shark in a steel tank, which was sold for £9.6m. His White Cube gallery was identified as the underbidder on lots sold for an estimated total of more than £20m.

Most of Jopling’s activity was in the Monday session, which exceeded all price expectations. Two other Hirst dealers, Larry Gagosian and Harry Blain, were active that evening.

Gagosian, Hirst’s dealer in America, bought one lot for £880,000. He was second highest bidder for a calf in a golden case, which sold for £10.3m.

Blain, a co-founder of the Haunch of Venison gallery who deals in Hirst’s works, bought two pieces and was underbidder on two others. Among his purchases was a glass cabinet containing medicines, which cost £1.3m.

This weekend White Cube and Gagosian declined to discuss whether they were acting on behalf of clients or buying on their own behalf to protect the market in Hirst works.

Blain said in a statement: “Bids were placed for private clients on their accounts who wanted to acquire the works for their respective collections.” Fellow dealers point out that White Cube, Gagosian and Blain have many clients interested in buying Hirst’s work so it was not entirely surprising that they would be heavily involved in an auction of new pieces.

Philip Hoffman, chief executive of the Fine Art Fund, sat at the auction between Jopling and a billionaire retailer. He said there was some “protectionism” and he saw Jopling bid for a “lousy piece”, which was likely to do badly.

Richard Feigen, a New York gallery owner who is a critic of Hirst’s work, believes the art market is open to manipulation. “The dealers have a huge interest in sustaining prices and they have substantial inventories of their own,” he said.
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  #108  
Old 09-24-2008, 11:05 AM
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evaldart evaldart is offline
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Re: Damien Hirst auction

Thank you Blake.

Big damn surprise...culture...sheeeesh!
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  #109  
Old 09-24-2008, 11:26 AM
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StevenW StevenW is offline
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Re: Damien Hirst auction

It is kind of funny the lengths people will go to in order to prop up a myth.
In the back of my mind I had a strange vision of the world crumbling around us while these people sat around calmly spending their millions and sipping tea. It reminded me of the fall of Rome and of the Soviet empire, whose magnates had already looted their natural resources and treasures, sold them out to foreigners and now live in 100 million dollar homes in Venice and the like.. Put them all to the question and ready the pikes on London bridge.
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  #110  
Old 09-24-2008, 01:19 PM
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suburbanartists suburbanartists is offline
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Re: Damien Hirst auction

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Originally Posted by suburbanartists View Post
Cheese - But this thread was about the auction. He is from the a PT Barnum school and finding many suckers..
Seemed obvious even before the news broke.

Now he's no more than a bad pyrimid scheme operator. His house of cards... doomed. When you get busted F'in the people, The people will F you back.

He gives us all a bad name with his bs scam.
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  #111  
Old 09-24-2008, 01:22 PM
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suburbanartists suburbanartists is offline
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Re: Damien Hirst auction

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Hirst is a Jack As.

Yeah remember the 50 mill. or what ever he said the skull went for. It was all bull. It was Hirst's money (or was it called a loan) just to jack up the headline price. I wouldn't be surprised if he or his boys bought most everything there. Sotheby's - they've certainly proved themselves readily available for price fixing.
Nuf said.
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  #112  
Old 09-26-2008, 01:42 AM
cooljamesx1 cooljamesx1 is offline
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Re: Damien Hirst auction

jez look at you people money money money money marketing, PR, who gives two shits about all that stuff? who cares who bought what and for how much? like its some big conspiracy...
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  #113  
Old 10-06-2008, 05:21 AM
fused fused is offline
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Re: Damien Hirst auction

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Originally Posted by suburbanartists View Post
Seemed obvious even before the news broke.

Now he's no more than a bad pyrimid scheme operator. His house of cards... doomed. When you get busted F'in the people, The people will F you back.
The same auction scheme was executed by several collectors with Julian Schnabel's work back in the late 80's to give his "value" an artificial boost.

Bumped into a few Sotheby images from this sale, for anyone who hasn't seen 'em.
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  #114  
Old 10-06-2008, 06:17 AM
CroftonGraphics CroftonGraphics is offline
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Re: Damien Hirst auction

I have nothing against what Damien Hirst is doing.

His name will be in art history books.

All these 'scams' he is doing is just a way of marketting his art.
What is worse this sort of carry on or the blatant fraud going on with world bankers at the moment?

I would rather see an artist rake in money that bankers who get bonuses for turning up to work and saying the right words.

Although perhaps unintended, Hirst's skull was shown at a time when bling was at is height. Bankers/traders were doing dodgy dealings. Everyone thought they were immortal along with their credit card limit. To me the skull is laughing back at us, although priceless it has no meaning as in the end we die.

Before anyone starts saying artists should not commentate on society/culture, Guernica anyone? Along with countless other works in history.

I do admit that I dont think Hirst wants to make a statement its up to the viewer.

Come on any day, who would you rather see, Hirst or self obsesed Emin?
Neither?
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