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  #51  
Old 12-31-2008, 12:26 PM
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evaldart evaldart is offline
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

Cheese, the life of the artist is not hard to do unless you want it to be, unless you make it so, DEMAND that it be difficult, challenging, scary, confrontational, confounding, baffling and belittling. OF COURSE there are plenty of posing coat-tailers who have figured out how to flourish by making a farce of the creative act. THEY'RE EVERYWHERE...its a business (ever been to NYC?). There are coasting charaders in every gallery and museum...propped-up by playing the game with the smallest amount of effort and the greatest amount of scheming. There are so many paycheck-grubbers with titles and positions(...and a ruse of a body of work; just enough-so to keep-up the shennanigan) that you cant even get to the bar at Finelli's for a ten dollar draft. Our field is LOUSY with them. I know when I see them...dont you?
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  #52  
Old 12-31-2008, 12:37 PM
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

Quote:
Our field is LOUSY with them. I know when I see them...dont you?
Its not just our field. Its every damn field. I see them every where. You gotta have a sense of humor about it, unless its your doctor or lawyer.
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  #53  
Old 12-31-2008, 12:42 PM
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by evaldart View Post
there are plenty of posing coat-tailers...
I'll start calling you "Socra-dart" if you're not careful.

Socrates said "there are those with titles and those who deserve them". Funny how this made me think of that.

Cheese is right though, in that there is nothing to fear and to have some faith. I get that, I'm not competing with any coat-tailers.
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  #54  
Old 12-31-2008, 04:55 PM
grommet grommet is offline
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

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I know when I see them...dont you?
You mean the ones whose networking ability is their true art? You know, popcorn worthy.
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  #55  
Old 01-01-2009, 08:11 AM
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

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Originally Posted by jOe~ View Post
There are NO givens, especially if it could be decorative. That's a crreepy thought. I'd rather it be art, somehow, even if it was hard, rather than decorative.
Sorry, I guess this:

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Originally Posted by cheesepaws View Post
I think it is a given that a straight up scan of a person - without further hand manipulation OR set in its conceptual context - would have a hard time finding its place in the Art world beyond the decorative.
Should read more like this:

I think it is a given that a straight up scan of a person - without further hand manipulation OR set in its conceptual context - would have a hard time finding its place amid VISUAL CULTURE beyond the COMMERCIALLY decorative.

I probably didn’t fix what you were offended by – help me out if I didn’t.

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In what? You mean there are givens, to have faith in? Lay it on me man. Blow me away!
I would never presume to blow anyone away - I leave that for "Socra-dart" .

I was simply saying that folks should HAVE FAITH in what they are doing without judging or measuring themselves against what they perceive others are doing. If Joe Sculptor (not YOU obviously) is scanning figures, having a robot carve them in stone and then sending them to a jeweler to be encrusted in diamonds AND having some kind of financial success or notoriety - so what? Why the impulse to criticize or belittle the creator as a scam artist?

The most important marker of success seems to be if one is happy doing what one does – regardless of other rewards. That goes for the hobbyist, weekend stone carver to the Art Stars with the sliced cows. HAVE FAITH in what you do regardless of what your neighbor does. HAVE FAITH that those who make art, make it for the same basic reason you do – they love it and it makes them happy.

Last edited by cheesepaws : 01-01-2009 at 08:45 AM.
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  #56  
Old 01-01-2009, 08:29 AM
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

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Cheese, the life of the artist is not hard to do unless you want it to be, unless you make it so, DEMAND that it be difficult, challenging, scary, confrontational, confounding, baffling and belittling.
Of course it is hard road - simply because the visual arts are not valued enough in our culture. Ignore the fact that truly committing one's life to art as a full-time pursuit IS a hard life (financially, emotionally, physically) if you want to - but THAT it is hard is often the only reward.

Quote:
Originally Posted by evaldart View Post
OF COURSE there are plenty of posing coat-tailers who have figured out how to flourish by making a farce of the creative act. THEY'RE EVERYWHERE...its a business (ever been to NYC?). There are coasting charaders in every gallery and museum...propped-up by playing the game with the smallest amount of effort and the greatest amount of scheming. There are so many paycheck-grubbers with titles and positions(...and a ruse of a body of work; just enough-so to keep-up the shennanigan) that you cant even get to the bar at Finelli's for a ten dollar draft. Our field is LOUSY with them. I know when I see them...dont you?
You see dead people.

Seriously, unless you can see into their heads - measure their sincerity, gauge their love for art, walk a mile in their shoes, etc - you simply can't make the call on their motivations. Why bother? Posers are SEPs (Somebody Else's Problem - thank you Douglas Adams!) - they only exist if you are looking for them and they matter to you.

Get back to the studio and they will disappear soon enough.
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  #57  
Old 01-01-2009, 08:30 AM
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

Oh, and happy new year to everyone.
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  #58  
Old 01-01-2009, 01:46 PM
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

I agree that the straw man theory, in which we assign motives (always bad) to artists we dont know, based on the fact that we dont like the work, is ultimately pointless and timewasting.

If you dont like a certain style, or process, or type of work, Dont do it.

But to call anyone who does it a phony or a poser- me, I dont agree.

I know, and love, some people whose work I dont like. Doesnt make em phony, or sellouts, or even bad artists- they truly believe in what they do, and still are sincere and have soul.


Anyway- back to digital.

What about the work of Bathsheba Grossman?

She does all her work in the computer, and the finished sculptures are rapid prototypes, spit out by CNC machines.

And yet, this work, to me anyway, clearly has soul.

I do not believe any inanimate object can have a soul.
What it does, instead, is express the soul of the human being who created it.
Now if the human being is nasty, the expression of their soul in the work may be nasty too, but it doesnt mean it isnt there- Albert Speer was working for Hitler, to glorify Nazism, but the buildings he built still have a distinct viewpoint, personality, and, yes, soul- a rigid, authoritarian, top down, dictatorial soul, but an identifiable soul nonetheless.

And every object humans make, similarly, expresses the life story, the experience, and the viewpoint of the creator. Some of whom are just less interesting, or sympathetic, than others.

So me, I believe that digitally created artworks clearly still have soul- its just that it may be soul you dont like.

Grossman expresses her geometrically obsessed, math genius soul in every piece she makes, and, looking at a lot of them, you get the portrait of a unique human, who, in my opinion, is definitely an artist- a body of work that shows her perspective on the natural, and manmade world.

As far as I am concerned, its clearly sculpture, with a clear and personal point of view, and I like it.

http://www.bathsheba.com/
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  #59  
Old 01-03-2009, 01:53 AM
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

I have contended personally with my identity as a sculptor when I chose to use digital tools. I had visions of what I wanted my sculptures to be but no way to create them. This is no longer the case. I encourage anyone to submit a traditional way to accomplish the forms I create (they are cast bonze not screen dumps). Furthermore, I challenge anyone who has never sculpted digitally to try it. There are many free demos of the current programs available. You cannot magically create a great sculpture just because you have a computer & software anymore than an expensive hammer & chisel will make a Bernini for you. You must have the vision, skills & talent.

So, if something cannot be made but with a digital toolset, is it doomed to never live as "sculpture" or "art". Must a sculptor have to physically touch the medium to be render their intent? We now have rules regarding this? The masters had (& still have) apprentices to manually carry out their visions. I do think a scan of a body that is then simply output via a 3D printer is nothing more than a copy, but I cannot say that I wouldn't consider a novel assemblage of scanned figures to be sculpture...maybe not figure sculpture, but sculpture.

Obviously most of this comes down to personal taste... some like landscapes, others nudes. My only preference is that the digital work should be built and exist in full 3 dimensions, but as "virtual worlds" continue to develop maybe we can find a new acceptable pedestal on which to view this new medium. I think these new technologies are a boon for sculpture and liberating for artists. It is a game changer, so put down your rocks & pick up your rifles...everything is different.
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  #60  
Old 01-03-2009, 02:50 PM
Giotto Giotto is offline
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

Cheesepaws posed the question "why is it important"...I have been thinking about this for a week now and here are my thoughts.

When I see sculpture my first reaction is sensual. Then homunculus, that person who sits behind my senses, my consciousness or intellect kicks in...so my experience becomes more complex over time and my reaction shifts. Seeing does not work like a camera.

For example:
Say I see a sculpture of a male warrior, in a Rodin style. My first reaction might be to like it so for discussion sake I rate it at a 7. Then by reading the sculptors bio I find out he was x military, in a road side bombing in Iraq and is recovering after loosing several friends. Knowing he was sculpting about his pain and insights I might see more in the sculpture and rate it higher say 9...Then I log onto his website and find he had made 20 of these all the same with different poses and he that actually scanned a GI joe action figure using software that had a "Rodinize" function...my rating goes to a 2....

So why is that important ? It's not but if you have even been to a Michael's art supply store you will fine 50% of the items for sale are designed to make untalented and unskilled individual look good. Pantographs etc....so I think we will see a lot of 3D computerized art in the future..some of it will be very good...but most of it will be pretentious. i.e. like some body casting, offered up for sale to the unsuspecting public.

This doesn't really bother me but rather it's a minor irritation I reserve for "penis enhancement drugs" "Credit card teaser rates" "Send your check to the devine incandesce church""Speak russian in 5 days" "I lost 40 pounds in a week using diet coke" etc etc.

I do have a lot of respect for those whose motives are to work in and discover new ways of artistic expression. I have to tell you I greatly admire those computer artists who put it out there that this is the method they use. That kind of integrity and honesty is what is needed so I feel there is a place for serious computer generated art.

G
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  #61  
Old 01-03-2009, 03:59 PM
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

Giotto, I respect and agree with much of what you have said, but here is where I differ. If I, as a hands on figurative sculptor, can be fooled by a GI Joe-scanned-Rodinizer-button-morphed computer generated production, then I should not care how it was produced. If the results move me as a work of art should, that is what matters. I'm just not convinced that such would be the case through those means.
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  #62  
Old 01-03-2009, 04:09 PM
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

Yeah, pressing the "ART" button is never gonna get you art. But they'll change the definition around enough and "culture" will decide that its okay.

There will always be some choosy mothers, though, who wont have it...who can taste the difference...who will hold-out for the real thing; to gain the nourishment that they're used-to getting.
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  #63  
Old 01-03-2009, 04:10 PM
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Giotto View Post
Say I see a sculpture of a male warrior, in a Rodin style. My first reaction might be to like it so for discussion sake I rate it at a 7. Then by reading the sculptors bio I find out he was x military, in a road side bombing in Iraq and is recovering after loosing several friends. Knowing he was sculpting about his pain and insights I might see more in the sculpture and rate it higher say 9...Then I log onto his website and find he had made 20 of these all the same with different poses and he that actually scanned a GI joe action figure using software that had a "Rodinize" function...my rating goes to a 2....
Hey G, I really think you make a rational argument but can you actually provide a concrete example of what you describe above - what artist? what work? I tend to suspect that the experience you describe is a bit of an invention - a rationalization - for some other, more complex fear of digitally assisted work. Be honest now - dig deeper.

Should your paranoia of being "duped" really impact what you like or dislike? Are you - perhaps - equating digitally assisted work with concept-based work or, more generically, contemporary artwork? Is your fear one of not "getting" something? Do you need some "real" base-level of craft or traditional (accessible) skill to ground your art viewing experience so that you CAN appreciate some funky concept or uncomfortable subject?

I got to say I really admire your raising of the whole subject and your thoughtful responses. I too have mixed feeling about a lot of art and always get a kick out of deconstructing what I dislike. Usually, I am just pissed off that I didn't think of something first! Sometimes, Iíll admit, I get frustrated when the technology behind a work of art overshadows more subtle concepts (like some of those damn Pixar-type films where they show off what the animators can do at the expense of a decent story!). It can be frustrating too feeling a pressure to learn even more processes when one has yet to master something like modeling or welding. I mean, even if you can't weld well one can usually stick a bunch of steel together - I get the feeling that it is not so with digital programs. I personally fear the learning curve when it extends too far beyond the instinctive or the tactile. But I donít dismiss the work of those who are excited by that challenge or who have that natural impulse.

But fear is good - it either keeps us inventing solutions with the tools we got or it pushes us to embrace the new.
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  #64  
Old 01-03-2009, 04:15 PM
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

I'd like to say it's the results that matter, but then there's that grey area akin to Rosie Ruiz winning the Boston marathon. So in the end I just hope for integrity in how the person presents the piece. Anything you can get your hands on is just fresh tools/materials. Hopefully the tools free up some time for some new artistic dicovery, as opposed to ever more time sunning your carcass on the beach, baking your brains. (set a timer, blistered artists aren't as flexible)
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  #65  
Old 01-04-2009, 10:57 AM
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

I certainly haven't read them all, but from my observation this is one of the best threads we've have in terms of clear exposition of the question and argument of the issues. I'm learning a lot.
One observation is that a lot of the argument reflects a very old art conundrum: Is it the object or the context that is significant? The glib answer is both, and I adopt it.
To look at a life size Egyptian statue pounded into granite, reflecting a particular society, religion, age, and technique and say that the object is all there is to it and all that will be remembered, all seems to me to be a very limited way to look at and understand it. Sculpture is more than shape.
Just at this moment I ask, where are the curators? I'd like to see a good show of "computer generated" sculpture [argue the definition of that later], maybe even distinguishing that which is computer produced from that which is only computer designed. There was such at the Whitney some years ago, but it's time for another, and I would have it restricted to sculpture. It's exactly that kind of show that helps to redefine aspects of art, and the thread shows that this art is ripe for it.
If this thread continues, I'll be back.
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  #66  
Old 01-05-2009, 05:51 PM
GaryR52 GaryR52 is offline
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

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One observation is that a lot of the argument reflects a very old art conundrum: Is it the object or the context that is significant?
Or the process? Many of the most rabid proponents of digital art (both 2D and 3D) seem to be fixated upon the digital process to the exclusion of all else. While I'm in both camps at once, myself, I'm beginning to look at this a little more critically than I have before. Perhaps I'm over the "gee whiz" phase of my attraction to this technology and can now look at it more objectively and bluntly. Anyway, it seems, to me, that many are failing to see the product of these processes in the same terms that others (critics, collectors, curators, the public) do. Aside from, perhaps, a difference in the final materials, as well as the process by which they're created, in the end a digital sculpture is still just a sculpture, is it not? The critics, collectors, curators and, especially the public probably don't care that much about the process involved - if they are even aware of it. So, aside from the difference in process and materials, what is there to distinguish digital sculpture as a new art medium?

When direct metal sculptors first began working with welding equipment, they were not only using a completely new and different medium and process, but the outcome of their process was something that looked entirely different from the traditional sculpture that came before it, done in materials such as stone, clay, wax, wood, etc. But, unless a digital sculptor creates new forms that can only be created digitally and/or via RP and by no other process, then, despite the difference in materials and process, it still comes out looking like sculpture done in other materials and by other processes. I even have to include myself in that, as my own digital pieces, with but few exceptions, could just as well have been done by traditional means and in traditional materials. In fact, when I encountered prohibitive costs in rapid prototyping a few years ago, I used a render of one of my digital pieces as reference for a carving done by hand in foam. I guess what I'm asking is, what is the point of the process being digital if it's most often used to do what's already been done in other materials? If a piece remains in the "virtual" realm because it is impossible for it to exist in true three dimensional space, due to weight or structural issues, then that is truly something that can't be duplicated in any other material or process and is, therefore, unique to the digital process. But, if the piece is capable of being brought into three dimensions via RP, then all that has been achieved is a savings of labor and, perhaps, time and money. Is that all digital sculpture boils down to, in the end? A labor saving process for mass manufacturing? Hmmm...I'm starting to sound disillusioned, aren't I?

Gary
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  #67  
Old 01-05-2009, 06:23 PM
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

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in the end a digital sculpture is still just a sculpture, is it not? then all that has been achieved is a savings of labor and, perhaps, time and money. Is that all digital sculpture boils down to, in the end? A labor saving process for mass manufacturing?

Gary
You may have swerved into the crux of the matter there. For many of us, most of the substance of art is achieved in the labor. The idea may begin in the mind, and yes the end product matters, but the infusing of the work with life, fire, and energy happens when one is engaging heart, head, and hands on the material. I'm not sure that I'm ready to believe that with just a keyboard and computer software one can create anything better than flashy stuff with a synthetic feel, if its figurative. Or problem-solving prior to creating the work with one's own hands. It seems that the best new frontier for digital sculpture may be for the uncastable mathmatical or organic works such as Bathsheba Grossman is doing.

Last edited by GlennT : 01-05-2009 at 10:19 PM.
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  #68  
Old 01-05-2009, 07:02 PM
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

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Is that all digital sculpture boils down to, in the end? A labor saving process for mass manufacturing?
Not at all.. Here's another model I did several years ago when the 1-million poly mark was just being "broken". Today, billion poly-cores are available pretty cheap, Z-Brush, XSI, Mudbox,.. I could never sculpt anything like this in a million years with my bare hands or even with the tools available to silver-smiths. I simply do not have the skill-set needed. Digital modeling allows me to create something with this level of detail relatively easily (actually it's not easy, well today it is, but that's irrelevent) and I could have it printed and call it "sculpture" if I chose to, but to me it would never be sculpture, it would be a printed model. If I chose to redefine my understanding of the word sculpture to include something like this or whatever is modeled and printed then there would be nothing stopping me from including tennis shoes and lego-men in that same definition and to me it is absurd.

There is one facet of the discussion which has not surfaced and that is intent. If you are modeling digitally with the intent of naming your printed object "sculpture", then so be it. I have no argument or grounds for argument against this other than to say I think the resulting product is a model no matter what you call it. The stone models I have seen are fabulous in their concept and precision, but so is mom's silver spoon collection..
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  #69  
Old 01-05-2009, 07:14 PM
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

Art is bound to beget new genres, mediums and unexpected entities of visualities that we cannot possibly predict. But WE here are sculptors (most of us) and to tear the relationship between body and medium, between hands and processes, between meat and mud, has to be regarded as another thing altogether. Yes, I know there are some big leaguers out there who have flourished by assissted means, they are exceptions (and they are perhaps the bridges to the thing that would like to challenge true painting and sculpture). I dont doubt that amazing things will come out of those thinking machines...but it will all just be designed "ready-mades"...assuring that Duchamp will have the last laugh after-all. Damn, he was smart.
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Old 01-05-2009, 07:22 PM
donnadodsonarti donnadodsonarti is offline
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

What's wrong with labor saving devices, tools and technologies for sculptors and processes for mass producing the work? I think the Japanese artists have shifted my thinking about that, ie Murakami, Yoshimoto Nara and Chiho Aoshima. In our culture we se Art as a certain form of work i.e. painting, sculpture, installation, photo, etc... that belongs in galleries and museums whereas we dont see basket weaving, floral arrangements or gardening as high art- but in Japan there is not a hard line between different art forms. That is something embedded in Western culture in my opinion. My second comment is that there is a difference between work that is made on the computer and work that is fabricated by the technologies that computer has to offer in that the mystery of the artists hand and soul is retained in a way that is lost by art that is purely fabricated by the machine. However, I've seen some original, and amazing work done by artists using the computer, but it has different qualities and values than work done by hand. ie Chiho Aoshima's murals are pretty amazing! But I cant think of a sculptor who is creating digital forms or 3D subject matter that is amazing... yet. Maybe we havent really answered what the computer can add to the conversation, practice or market of sculpture.

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Old 01-05-2009, 08:00 PM
GaryR52 GaryR52 is offline
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

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What's wrong with labor saving devices, tools and technologies
Not a thing. But, if that's all that distinguishes this artform from its traditional counterpart, then what's the point? Does sculpture then reduce to simply what can be produced by the fastest, cheapest, easiest means? I'm playing devil's advocate, here, to be sure. I have nothing against making things easier. In fact, the history of the human race is the history of the quest to make life easier. It doesn't devalue the artwork, except in the minds of the vast majority of people who, in their ignorance of art, see art as being all about the relative difficulty of the process; i.e., craftsmanship. But, still, what else is left to distinguish a sculpture made on a computer and by rapid prototyping from a sculpture made by hand if both look alike? I think the digital sculpture that is only capable of virtual existence is the one that stands apart from other media, by virtue of its nature. When it is solidified as three dimensional object, as far as the viewer is concerned, it doesn't matter what process produced it, it's just another sculpture. But, on the other hand, and to return to the original question of the thread, is the virtual sculpture really sculpture when, by definition, a sculpture has the attributes of being three dimensional and tangible?



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...I've seen some original, and amazing work done by artists using the computer, but it has different qualities and values than work done by hand.
Exactly my point, but aren't those qualities that make it different lost as soon as the piece moves from the virtual to the actual? If it's the qualities it possesses while in the virtual realm that make it unique when compared to other media, then what happens when those qualities disappear as soon as a tangible object is made? The very thing that makes digital sculpture digital is its existence in virtual space. Once the image is rendered as a tangible, three dimensional object, it loses its inherent "digitalness" - the very quality that made it unique.

Gary
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Old 01-05-2009, 11:04 PM
donnadodsonarti donnadodsonarti is offline
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

I guess I missed the point, which is to answer the question and so my answer would be, I dont know. I think it's cool to be able to scale up and down with my work- so I am using it as a tool, similar to a pointing machine. I am not creating my work on it. I think if the designs are original then the sculpture is original but the real test is the market. What does the market do with it? Just because you are using a vector based program does it create economies of scale for your products? I think the taste and response of the audience to digital sculpture is the true test. So to answer that question for my self, I havent seen anything yet that was created by a machine that made me say Wow! Even if the sculpture is an answer to a mathematical algorithm or something, I'd say so what, because I would judge it by how it looked to me not by how amazing the process that went into making it was, but that's just me.
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Old 01-06-2009, 12:48 AM
GaryR52 GaryR52 is offline
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

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Originally Posted by donnadodsonarti View Post
I think it's cool to be able to scale up and down with my work- so I am using it as a tool, similar to a pointing machine.
Yes, that is a good application of the technology, and one that doesn't necessarily lead to a digitally produced end product, as it it can be used to create enlargements in any material that will burn out during bronze casting.

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Originally Posted by donnadodsonarti View Post
I think if the designs are original then the sculpture is original but the real test is the market. What does the market do with it? Just because you are using a vector based program does it create economies of scale for your products? I think the taste and response of the audience to digital sculpture is the true test. So to answer that question for my self, I havent seen anything yet that was created by a machine that made me say Wow! Even if the sculpture is an answer to a mathematical algorithm or something, I'd say so what, because I would judge it by how it looked to me not by how amazing the process that went into making it was, but that's just me.
Exactly. I like what Bathsheba Grossman is doing and she's definitely an expert on the cutting edge, where that's concerned. But, my personal tastes in sculpture don't happen to coincide with hers, so, while it's interesting, geometrical pieces don't really appeal to me. I'm into organic form and, being a dyscalculic, I'm decidedly not interested in the mathematical aspect, either. It looks like there is a small niche market for her work and she appears to be doing well in filling it, though. Corrine Whitaker is another who seems to be doing well for herself, though hers are more organic forms. I guess it's just a matter of time before digital sculpture becomes mainstream in the fine art realm. For now, though, it seems to be mostly those in the motion picture and game development industries who are making a living at it.

Gary
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Old 01-06-2009, 09:07 AM
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I.Chonov I.Chonov is offline
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

My problem with digital sculpture is-no fun in the process of making it (here, the craftsman speaking). I admit it may not be important to other people, but I do what I do, because I find pleasure and fun in it, among other things.Right now I'm going to jump from the chair and do some carving -just to feel the chisel in my hand, and I believe this beats computer modeling hands down.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ries
What about the work of Bathsheba Grossman?
Sorry , Ries- I'm usually 100% with you when you call Art works others call craft, like architecture, applied arts %so on- but not here.Just visited her website-and I find this stuff cold , soulless , and so obviously machine-made...-you know, now that I think of it, even if it were made by hand , using traditional tools, it still wouldn't look like a work made by a human.Disgustihg.

Ivan
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Old 01-06-2009, 09:34 AM
GaryR52 GaryR52 is offline
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Re: Is digital sculpture....sculpture ?

Same here, on the fun aspect. When I did a piece in carved foam, a few years ago, from a render of one of my digitally designed forms, I got a lot more pleasure from the carving experience than I have from all the digital pieces I've done combined. I like working with computers, but there are some things that computers are just not ideally suited to. I think art may be one of them. I've been on both sides of this issue and I'm coming to the conclusion that using computers to do artwork, whether 2D or 3D, reduces one to a computer technician and reduces the artwork to something sterile, untouched by human hands and untouched by the human creative spirit. In looking at digital art, 2D or 3D, and contrasting it with the handmade, I'll take the handmade any day.

Does this mean I'm through with digital sculpture? Well, not yet. I believe there is room for improvement and further exploration of this medium. Maybe one day it will look more like the work of artists and less like the work of manufacturing technicians. Besides, I like seeing what kind of shapes I can create this way and it's a faster, cheaper way of exploring ideas. As I've shown, you don't necessarily have to conclude those ideas digitally; the digitally wrought idea can be fleshed out by hand in real materials. So, for me, if nothing else, digital sculpture remains useful, if for no other purpose than being a kind of digital sketchbook.

Gary
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