Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net  

Go Back  Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net > Sculpture Roundtable Discussions > Sculpture focus topics
User Name
Password
Home Sculpture Community Photo Gallery ISC Sculpture.org Register FAQ Members List Search New posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-12-2008, 02:51 PM
soul_holder soul_holder is offline
Level 2 user
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Wales - Carmarthen
Posts: 13
What's your intension as an artist?

This goes out to everyone i suppose.. Do you have an artist intension? If so how did you discover it?

I have to write my dissertation soon and am currently being prompted to really start taking control and responsibility for my creative practice, and to distinguish what it is I'm trying to say to the world through my art and why.

Why do you want to make what you make? Where does your art stand in your contemporary world? And Why do u want to share it with people? What are you trying to achieve?

Are these really the fundamental, underlining questions that need to be answered in order to peek your artistic measure? Is making artworks for the fun of exploring visual forms not enough anymore?

I'm not against this 'question answering' approach to creative practice I just wanna know if its really the most beneficial? I personally find it quite stressful; I originally decided I wanted to pursue art because i thought I was good at pleasing the eye and assumed that was what it was primarily about. Now I have to become some kind of philosopher as well. Its slowly putting me off art and I used to think I loved every bit of it.

If your a practicing artist, do you personally ask yourself these questions?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-12-2008, 03:02 PM
GlennT's Avatar
GlennT GlennT is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 4,213
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

If you are writing a dissertation, and your school is intellectualizing art to the point of nearly killing your inspiration, then congratualtions! You have helped make my point about why studying art at college can be a big waste of your time and money. ( Not to mention having gotten to the disseration level without learning to spell intention correctly)

I do have my own answers to some of the questions you pose, and I invite you to read about them on my website:

http://www.glennterryart.com

The discovery of my talents as an artist to the extent of pursuing it as my full time path did not occur until I was 29, so I had formed my ideas about art outside of the influence of college or the contemporary art scene. It is based on values I had developed though life experiences.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-12-2008, 03:21 PM
sculptor's Avatar
sculptor sculptor is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: IOWA
Posts: 1,493
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

personally, I'm a dilettante in that i creat that which i wish to see, experience, and appreciate.
Others appreciation is rewarding primarily in that it reassures me that I'm creating something beautiful within the greater bounds of a shared assumed sanity.

if you wish the epithet "Doctor of Philosophy" do not complain about being expected to
"become some kind of philosopher as well."

duh

The question before your eyes is in actuality, why you yourself would seek to be an artist or a philosopher of art.

beware the beast within "dissertation". Many have studied for years and, gazing into the gaping blood drenched jaws of the beast, run screaming into the night to live the rest of their lives A.B.D.
Self preservation or self delusion?

One sculpting mentor turned his art into craft, and slowly lost his desire to find something within, relying on commissions to guide him.
Another referred to some of us as "victims of too much education"

i suspect that
ART is beyond reason and there it needs remain.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-12-2008, 04:31 PM
realsculpt's Avatar
realsculpt realsculpt is offline
Level 6 user
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 131
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

the artist statment or intension is from my experience and with talking with other artist just marketing. I have been told its something we put on our websites in our mailers to attract the buyer and the critic, so thats why my personal statment has been hard to write.

lets face it if its not just marketing and its truley a philosophy, artists would refuse to sell thier work to people with different beliefs from thier own.
__________________
seth
www.forensicsculpting.com
www.realsculpt.com

Last edited by realsculpt : 10-12-2008 at 04:32 PM. Reason: forgot something
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-12-2008, 08:20 PM
tonofelephant's Avatar
tonofelephant tonofelephant is offline
ISC Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Martinsburg, WV
Posts: 724
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

SH -
Quote:
I have to write my dissertation soon and am currently being prompted to really start taking control and responsibility for my creative practice, and to distinguish what it is I'm trying to say to the world through my art and why.
You have my deepest sympathy about having to slice and dice your love for an occupation to satisfy some academic. I have seen several studies that show that once an artist gets beyond a BA their complusive/obsessive need to make art is snuffed out. What is left is the dry, barren desert of despair. Where did the love of art go? Imagine if you can, if you had to write a dissertation on the beautiful person you wanted to spend the rest of your life with - I imagine that you would be breaking up over the dissertation that would slice and dice the love to pieces.

But you did not ask that.
Quote:
Why do you want to make what you make? Where does your art stand in your contemporary world? And Why do u want to share it with people? What are you trying to achieve?
After 20 years as a full-time practicing (haven't got the swing of it yet) artist I make abstract stone sculpture for two reasons. I have to and I want to. In between those two statements, is the arena that clients buy my work. If I did not have to make the work, it would not be as good. If I did not want to make the work, the work would also suck. Sculpting seems to be my work (just like Rod - Sculptor). It is what I do best. It also sets me apart from my fellow business people in town. It also pays my bills.

My art standing in the contemporary world is an academic construct. My art is meant to be a moment of pleasure for a passer-by or an exclamation point of calm to the owner of the sculpture. I am not worried about the standing of my art in the contemporary world. I am worried about people buying it though, I do like eating. I guess that makes me a meat and potatoes kind of sculptor, not an Anish Kapor.

Why do i want to share it with people? Interesting question. Why should I not? I have always believed that the starving artist who dies surrounded by his art is and was a fool. The act of not sharing is a form of self-mutilation culminating in an attitude of "the unwashed public just does not understand me and my art" and other relentless self-pity. Besides as stated above, I pay my bills with sculpture, art, and the use of my brain to get it into new venues. I am not a trust fund brat by any means. I have to work, I need to work - sculpture is my work [Oh Christ I am sounding like Rod].

Quote:
What are you trying to achieve?
Possibly a sense of immortality. Before becoming a sculptor, I worked for a defense sub contractor. At the end of a days work as a sub contractor, all I had done was push paper from one side of the desk to another, made a few status reports, a couple of phone calls, nothing lasting. With sculpture, I have a tangible feel for producing a product that someone, somewhere will treasure. Maybe it will last past my lifetime. Hope so. Also, the sculpture is my vision, executed by my hands, to my standards. Knowing that I have personally made a client happy by means of my labor is a wonderful feeling.

Quote:
Are these really the fundamental, underlining questions that need to be answered in order to peek your artistic measure? Is making artworks for the fun of exploring visual forms not enough anymore?
I don't think so. Making art that pleases me and other people is enough. I also don't get your second question. To me art is a voyage of discovery. Not always sailing a smooth sea but a lot of the time it is. Each new sculpture is an opportunity to excel and explore equally. It is never an either or situation.

Now that I have answered your questions mostly and to my own end, its your turn. The doubt and angst seems to be crawling out from your original question. All of the questions you asked really need to be answered by you. It is your dissertation. Maybe you should consider shelving the dissertation for awhile (6 months or so) and see if you really want to make art a full time object of obsession (make a living from it). If after a break, you want to go back to academia land and just talk art do it - but don't have any regrets.

Carl
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-13-2008, 07:06 AM
evaldart's Avatar
evaldart evaldart is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: easthampton, massachusetts
Posts: 5,637
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

"inTENSION", yes, what a word - thats it! that IS my intention.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-13-2008, 07:34 AM
I.Chonov's Avatar
I.Chonov I.Chonov is offline
Level 7 user
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Maine-et-Loire , France
Posts: 151
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

Quote:
Originally Posted by soul_holder View Post
Why do you want to make what you make? Where does your art stand in your contemporary world? And Why do u want to share it with people? What are you trying to achieve?
well, maybe this is beyond the limits of my English, but I'll try to toss my 5 cents:
I do what I do because I need to- even if now in Spain to make one's living on abstract sculpture is a hopeless mission, I just feel OK carving, it's sort of an active meditation-and a soul-healing experience.What do you try to achieve by breathing?

Quote:
...Is making artworks for the fun of exploring visual forms not enough anymore?
I think that the important thing is not the artworks themselves- they are a byproduct of walking a path-and the walking is what matters, and how we change in the process



Quote:
...Now I have to become some kind of philosopher as well. Its slowly putting me off art and I used to think I loved every bit of it.If your a practicing artist, do you personally ask yourself these questions.
Nothing wrong with a little bit of philosofy - I hope it doesn't stop you making art, and i suppose evrione asks nim/herself questions-you need to, if you wanna find the answers.

....and, trying to answer your questions, I discovered an explanation for myself ,about how I see the creative process( path, meditation & philosofy, remember?)- guess that if I were a samurai, I wold call it bushido
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-13-2008, 08:47 AM
cheesepaws's Avatar
cheesepaws cheesepaws is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,137
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

Looks like a bit of educational system/language usage issue. Looking at his profile - I am pretty sure that Soul-Holder is basically the equivalent of a college senior working on his thesis in the U.S. system.

Quote:
Originally Posted by soul_holder View Post
Are these really the fundamental, underlining questions that need to be answered in order to peek your artistic measure? Is making artworks for the fun of exploring visual forms not enough anymore?
As far as your question – yes! These are fantastic questions to be asking yourself if you want to continue to make art that originates and responds to an academic context. Having “fun” can (and should) still be an experience that is part of your process – but unless you are occasionally delving into new arenas of skill and knowledge (which can, at times, be less than fun) - how do you expect to grow? Making art for the “fun” of exploring visual forms has never been enough (childhood aside).

Quote:
Originally Posted by soul_holder View Post
I'm not against this 'question answering' approach to creative practice I just wanna know if its really the most beneficial? I personally find it quite stressful; I originally decided I wanted to pursue art because i thought I was good at pleasing the eye and assumed that was what it was primarily about. Now I have to become some kind of philosopher as well. Its slowly putting me off art and I used to think I loved every bit of it.
What does “pleasing the eye” even mean? Aren’t you curious about what is going on in the minds of your viewers that makes it pleasing? Who else has made work that uses the same visual devices as you? Did you copy them or arrive at the same solutions independently? How do you differ? How do your forms relate to your materials? Why is that form/material relationship relevant? How might you describe the experience your sculptures project? Do they manage this through surface? form? subject matter? Do you associate “pleasing” with some level of craft or skill? The list goes on and on…

He whole notion of “pleasing” acknowledges your viewer (which is great). Just write about the experience you want your viewer to have and how you get them to that place. Focus on the viewer rather than YOUR feeling, personal experience or biography. Visual analysis is a skill. Practice writing about your work from the viewer’s perspective – then, return to the personal and other contextual issues that might have provided motivation in your process.

What is your subject of study - what is your art about? Some may dismiss art that overtly engages cultural/social/political subjects – but most work functions on multiple levels. You will be hard pressed to find much work that does not at least engage the psychology of composition or color – let alone the science of such things. My point is that if you are feeling pressure to invent some political message (for example) as a subject in your work for the sake of a paper - well, composition, color, materiality, process can all be explored as subject and in (an academic) depth.

Of course, you are free to make work that does not engage contemporary studio practices, art history or the viewer on some level - but that is a life outside of art galleries, museums, and comparisons to the heroes of sculpture – some of which I bet you really dig.

Unless you want to be mired in the past you must ask yourself why is it important to be making the work you make today, here and now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by soul_holder View Post
If your a practicing artist, do you personally ask yourself these questions?
Absolutely. I spend a good deal of time thinking and writing about what I am doing in the studio. Likewise, reading journals and books, visiting galleries and museums and making connections with other artists are all equally important to me and the work I am making. All of these experiences and information come together in the work. It IS the art making – all of it.

I have found that the older I get the less I share all this research/information with my viewer BUT, because I am getting better at it, the less I need to.

Good luck! Don’t make excuses – things that start hard usually yield amazing results.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-13-2008, 10:27 AM
Ries's Avatar
Ries Ries is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Edison Washington
Posts: 1,154
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

This whole thread reminds me why I dropped out of High School, and then Art school (twice).
Not that I dont have intentions, and In-Tensions, as well, and not that I dont think about, talk about, and write about my work, and the work of others.

I just like to do it all on my terms.

Still, I think its pretty important to be able to explain why you do what you do.
Some of us, though, are still figuring out how to do that after 30 years or so- so if your thesis doesnt answer every cosmic question about art, I wouldnt worry- you got time.
__________________
Been There.
Got in Trouble for that.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-14-2008, 08:11 PM
fritchie's Avatar
fritchie fritchie is offline
Sculptor
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 3,456
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

Reading this whole thread, I think Cheesepaws hit the nail on the head with his explanation of the British thesis requirement. My main career was in chemistry/physics, and there was no thesis requirement for a B.S. (Bachelor of Science). Nor for B.A. (Bachelor of Art).

However, all B.F.A. (Bachelor of Fine Art) students - whether in sculpture, painting, music or theater - were and still are required to write a thesis for graduation. This partly is a recognition that salesmanship is a requirement for supporting oneself with art, and that a university has an implied responsibility to help the student see that fact.

I sympathize with your anguish, but if you want the degree, take charge and just write the thesis. And please learn to use a computer spell-checker. You won't get the thesis approved without that.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 10-21-2008, 04:49 PM
soul_holder soul_holder is offline
Level 2 user
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Wales - Carmarthen
Posts: 13
Re: What's your intention as an artist?

Hi Guys, I'd like to thank everyone for replying to my thread with comments and feedback, it is hugely appreciated. I'd like to thank 'Cheesepaws' especially for his/her particularly thorough response to my inquiry which has been most helpful and was what I feel I needed to hear; you expressed it in words that I'm sure my lecturers could never find.

Speaking of words... My bad on the repeated spelling mistake in my post; it's been a regretful display of negligence on my behalf. I also hope I didn't come across as too cynical either, I was very unfocused and wasn't getting much sleep at the time but now I'm in a far better mindset for some self-reflection and your comments have helped me all the way.

Thanx again everyone

David
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 12-10-2008, 06:01 PM
fshnrod fshnrod is offline
Level 2 user
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: bozeman montana
Posts: 18
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

To make myself happy!!!!
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 12-11-2008, 03:47 AM
Portoro Portoro is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 342
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

This is such a great question! And I am constantly surprised by the number of artists who reject this kind of self-analysis. Thinking through what you are doing and your art practice is GOOD. Disengage the brain, and art just becomes a vehicle for your emotions. Too much emoting is bad for you.
I personally know of no great artist who doesn’t have a sense of where they stand in relation to their contemporaries. Does anyone out there really think that these artists are just ‘making stuff’? Many of these artists have offered profound and complex statements, so, if I was setting out on a dissertation on the subject, I’d start with those artists who are a major part of modern art history, get some volumes on their perception of what they are doing, and why. After all, was Duchamp just making art ‘for fun’? Of course not. Was Dada just ‘self expression’? Art is often driven by social, historical and theoretical issues (Cubism, Futurism) and by art’s response to its environment (Pop art), as well as sheer self-expression (Expressionism). The analysis helps us to refine our understanding. Why IS Damien Hirst preoccupied with pills/chemists shops/hospital waste? What is he engaging with here? The question ‘why’ is valid and useful.

After looking at some modern artists and their views, I’d then search down through art history to see what has been at the heart of the practice of others (The contrast will be useful in a dissertation). The reasons for making art are going to be different for Michelangelo, as will the reasons for the tribal mask-maker's practice (which raises the issue of your needing to define the range of what you will deal with in the dissertation).
Before all that, though, I'd talk though a reasonably well-defined subject with your tutor and then get some clarity about the principles/the perspective you intend to apply - a rambling collection of views from the ISC community isn't analysis. Personally, I'd enjoy doing a dissertation on the role of theory in art - theory IS a driver, even if it doesn't drive everyone.

I also think some of the questions you are asking are too broad - 'Why do you want to share it?' That's a dissertation in itself, and you might need a degree in pyschology to conclude anything meaningful. That question can apply to anything and everything. As for 'Isn't 'fun' enough?' What, like splashing in mud pools? You will have to define your terms, and I for one do NOT sculpt for fun. I'm an adult, for Christ's sake.

Personally, I think that I. Chonov makes a lot of sense (see above).

Last edited by Portoro : 12-11-2008 at 05:59 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 12-11-2008, 07:04 AM
StevenW's Avatar
StevenW StevenW is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Denver
Posts: 2,320
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

Quote:
Originally Posted by soul_holder View Post

Why do you want to make what you make? Where does your art stand in your contemporary world? And Why do u want to share it with people? What are you trying to achieve?
It's very rare when I pick a rock out of the pile and know what it is that I am going to make, more often than not it decides what it wants to be based upon its makeup and physical attributes. I take the 5th on the next question as most of my stuff doesn't stand anywhere except on people's bookshelves.

One word is missing in this discussion, or at least I didn't see it anywhere and to me it is the most important. I want to create and share it out of love. Love of the recipient, love of process, love of permanance in a brief and impermanant life.

I do have an ultimate goal, an achievement of sorts in mind although it remains elusive and obscure. I think Hendrix said it best: Well I'm standin next to a mountain, chop it down with the edge of my hand.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 12-11-2008, 07:26 AM
evaldart's Avatar
evaldart evaldart is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: easthampton, massachusetts
Posts: 5,637
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

While lengthy dissertation might indeed impress the rugular folk, it really wont help the Art in the eyes of its own maker. Research and analysis of your favorite artists is indeed a pleasurable thing to do in between creative episodes, but such activity should be put with other avocational pass-times such as collecting stamps and gardening. Articulation of accumulated facts and fancies is just another brain teaser - it does not represent human growth. Sustenance will tell us what we NEED to learn and the artmaking will tell us what it is VITAL that we learn. Critics, historians, poets, novelists are SCRIBBLERS. They do not know anything about making Art (though the good ones can be entertaining), They are a creative sort, within the limits of little words (and some big ones) but they can't really help us all that much. Its easy enough to know what Michelangelo was about by looking at his work...its not very nice that some grasping academics would make things up and feed it to the gullible as fact or truth.

Last edited by evaldart : 12-11-2008 at 08:25 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 12-12-2008, 09:18 AM
cheesepaws's Avatar
cheesepaws cheesepaws is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,137
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

E. old man, your absolutism scares me! Let me know when you are getting ready to hole up in a mountain shack and pen your manifesto and I’ll send help. Or perhaps it is too late. Let go of your rigid exclusion of what you perceive as all things non-sculpture. Writing is a DIRECT means of accessing your work – embrace it (after all, you do SO much of it anyways ).

Without the scribblers Michelangelo’s sculptures are just funny lookin’ rocks. History, criticism, theory, poetry - activates artifact (and artifice) and lifts it to the realm of art.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 12-12-2008, 09:54 AM
grommet grommet is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 4,279
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

well you're right about the artifice part.
Writing can be insightful, but in the end you need to make up your own mind devoid of the coins from that slot in your head.. the writing doesn't change the physical that was there all along.
At that point your personal words are only a means to organize visually the swirling mess in your head for use later--for me anyway.
__________________
Taking my own advice
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 12-12-2008, 10:19 AM
evaldart's Avatar
evaldart evaldart is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: easthampton, massachusetts
Posts: 5,637
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cheesepaws View Post
E. old man, your absolutism scares me! Let me know when you are getting ready to hole up in a mountain shack and pen your manifesto and I’ll send help. Or perhaps it is too late. Let go of your rigid exclusion of what you perceive as all things non-sculpture. Writing is a DIRECT means of accessing your work – embrace it (after all, you do SO much of it anyways ).

Without the scribblers Michelangelo’s sculptures are just funny lookin’ rocks. History, criticism, theory, poetry - activates artifact (and artifice) and lifts it to the realm of art.

If you're depending on some poetry to lift your artifact up to the realm of Art then you better check your artifact. The poetry, criticism, history and theory all occur AFTER the Art is already done. Second generation (and then theres the writing about the writing...and so on) Oh, I have and still do enjoy those things...but only because I have all the time I need. Intensity, my friend, deconsecutivizes Time...so you can do All the things you want. All the hard stuff and all the easy stuff, too.


Hole up in a mountain shack?...cant happen. No place to plug in the welder, and I could NEVER live more that a mile away from a Burger King.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 12-12-2008, 11:43 AM
jOe~'s Avatar
jOe~ jOe~ is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Spokane, Wa
Posts: 3,190
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

Quote:
Without the scribblers Michelangelo’s sculptures are just funny lookin’ rocks. History, criticism, theory, poetry - activates artifact (and artifice) and lifts it to the realm of art.
Sorry Paws, but that is the weakest thing you've written. Art was made, classical 2d and 3d, because most people couldn't write, or read. Only recently have words played an important role in some art creations and makings. Here are statements written by David Smith: "Art is made without words. It doesn't need words to explain it or encourage its making." ...
"Perception through vision is a highly accelerated response, so fast, so complex, so free that it cannot be pinned down by the very recent limited science of word communication. To understand a work of art, it must be seen and perceived, not worded. Words can be used to place art historically, to set it in social context, to describe the movements, to relate it to other works, to state individual preferences, and to set the scene all around it. But the actual understanding of a work of art only comes through the process by which it was created—and that was by perception."
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 12-12-2008, 12:42 PM
GlennT's Avatar
GlennT GlennT is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 4,213
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cheesepaws View Post
Without the scribblers Michelangelo’s sculptures are just funny lookin’ rocks. History, criticism, theory, poetry - activates artifact (and artifice) and lifts it to the realm of art.

Michelangelo created art. The scribblers created scribble. Depending on their mood, they may participate in the elevation of the esteem of art, or be just as likely to attempt to devalue it to seem as funny looking rocks.

There is a reason why both the literate and the illiterate have flocked to view Michelangelo's work 500 years ago and continuously thru to today, whereas a scribbler's best work, after a few short years, can be found in a used book store lanquishing for under $40.

I like good writing just as much if not more than the next person (probably more), but I'm not confused about wherein does the power lay to raise artifact to art. That is the gift and the responsibility of the artist.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 12-12-2008, 01:32 PM
grommet grommet is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 4,279
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

Cheese, I can see where as an educator faced with a sea of blank why should I care, this is a required course faces you might think you're activating artifact. But really you're just activating their brains. The work is not the puppet, their brains are the puppet you're teaching them to use. But I'm sure you know that, so... what was the point???
__________________
Taking my own advice
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 12-12-2008, 09:19 PM
cheesepaws's Avatar
cheesepaws cheesepaws is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,137
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

How are most of us familiar with the classical works of our ancient past? Sure, some through first hand experience, but most through historical texts with pictures. Those texts are saddled to us – for some like myself, exposed to art history books at an early age - they are the very reason we sculpt. Likewise, every label we’ve ever read in a museum, every tool manual we’ve poured over, text informs our enjoyment of sculpture, our ability to manifest our visions, our continued passion in our craft and our own particular criticisms. One may claim that these texts are not part of the literal artistic process of making - but can anyone truly claim not to be influenced by text? Ever?!

My point in previous posts was that I don’t believe in the ability to exclude writing (be it history, criticism, or poetry) from the act of sculpting. I do NOT see writing as something that only happens AFTER the Art – after all – can you really separate Michelangelo’s David from the biblical reference? Why on Earth would you want to! The writing is solid subject – deliberately informing the hand of the artist.

I will remind you too that I am not in the camp that thinks that the “Art” is pure act – I believe in an “Art” that is INCLUSIVE – the act, the object, the subject and the changing context. I believe too that art has a social function – as time rolls along that function changes – eventually resigning “Art” to artifact – a document. Michelangelo’s David was Art in its day, but now it is only a record of that Art – thanks largely to the considerate dedication of art historians. That said, it is a nice piece of stone, would have been a shame to lose it (like so many fine sculpture only referenced in writing).

Joe - as far as the Smith quotes – I never listen to artists, they are far too selfish to know much about what they actually do (when they don’t just lie outright).

Grommet - my students know that writing, reading and sculpting are intrinsically linked. I encourage writing – insist on it actually. Doing so has consistently given me better sculptors.

Lastly, imagine an alien visitor to Earth – what would they make of that mis-proportioned David statue?! Would it be more than a “funny lookin’ rock” without the historical context? Something to consider perhaps.

We should be more open-minded about our shared passion. I will never claim to know anything as absolutely as some here tout. That attitude is bravado at best. I love the “scribblers.” I respond to them and rely on them. Lets show them some love already!

Last edited by cheesepaws : 12-13-2008 at 03:46 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 12-12-2008, 10:40 PM
desertrock's Avatar
desertrock desertrock is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 880
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

My intention is clear to me.
I continue to explore each stone to manifest the form most influential to the stone's charactor as it applies to: color, texture, grain, and any preconceived forms I wish to bring into it's creation. Exploring new asymetrical styles that are expressive of non-contrived or modeled perceptions, prior to the execution of the process I find very creative. It's an exploratative process, not always used, but particularly applicable to stones with rich color and texture ( pure, single color, stones are mostly emulated from drawings).
The exploratative process is the most exhilarating and stimulating to the creative process for ME.

Mark
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 12-13-2008, 07:46 AM
evaldart's Avatar
evaldart evaldart is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: easthampton, massachusetts
Posts: 5,637
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

Take ANY fully committed and prolific painter or sculptor, sedate them a little, set them down at the kitchen table and you'd get some real Art writing. But as soon as the sickly episode passes they'll be back where they belong...wrestling substance and issuing pertinence to BOTH the matter and the druthers of their ghostly perception.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 12-13-2008, 08:48 AM
jOe~'s Avatar
jOe~ jOe~ is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Spokane, Wa
Posts: 3,190
Re: What's your intension as an artist?

Quote:
Joe - as far as the Smith quotes – I never listen to artists, they are far too selfish to know much about what they actually do (when they don’t just lie outright).
and add this quote :
Quote:
my students know that writing, reading and sculpting are intrinsically linked. I encourage writing – insist on it actually. Doing so has consistently given me better sculptors.
Insist that they write, but don't read it because they probably aren't telling the truth, or know what they are writing about. Now everything makes perfect sense( as long as you don't read this because I am not a writer).
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Sculpture Community, Sculpture.net
International Sculpture Center, Sculpture.org
vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Russ RuBert