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  #1  
Old 04-11-2007, 02:14 AM
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Cantab Cantab is offline
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Thoughts on the beauty of art

Tuesday. 11 April 07. This morning, a very old issue arose again – why do we create art? This issue tends to pop up in my head at the least stimulus these days. This time when reading a review by A A Gill (in the ‘Culture’ section of The Sunday Times) of the new 'Restoration Village' programme on TV. The olde worlde English village setting of the programme was the subject of some Gill scorn: “ Dedham by name, Deadham by nature. Full of pinched-faced,self-satisfied wine-and-cheese Nimbies, talking about newcomers and outsiders the way Goebbels used to talk about rabbis and gypsies. The smugness of this hellish miniature world hung like a fart over its stunted, pristine prettiness….” I was reminded that one of the reasons why I create art is to escape ‘life as we know it’. Perhaps not unlike the people who have secreted themselves away in these awful villages. But maybe not really the same. At least, I hope not. Since I was a teenager I have loved minimalist art. Partly it was to do with growing up in the 1960s – minimal was meaningful, and cool. It was also transcendental. An art with no content, no world. There was something ‘zen’ about it. One of the cool things about the sixties was the desire to transcend normality. The drugs, trancendental and otherwise, the travelling into other cultures (Beates, etc), the hippy escape (drop out) and the rejection of the industrial/consumer lifestyle (remember communes?!). This is at the heart of my love of minimalism, and art. Basically, I don’t LIKE the world I occupy. So, in art I can inhabit a virtual world, inhabited by the things I value. OK, I know, so far this sounds really anal.

The situation is more complex. I’ve always aspired to ‘stand above’ everyday life. This may be because I’m not VERY GOOD at everyday life. But, more than that, it’s because everyday life looks too like a waste of time, and a waste of mind. Of consciousness. Cut consciousness out, and you have ‘Eastenders’ – a futile round of minutia writ large and relationship obsessives in action. Not only is there no transcendance here, but there is no hope either - Dante’s ‘Inferno’ acted out in the Westend of London. There is in fact a good deal of literature that does this. Detective fiction, where life is pared down to a narrative chain of events, and the answer to the puzzle is another event at the end of a sequence of other events. These stories, like ‘Eastenders’, lock us into the one-dimensionality of everyday life. Consciousness is reduced to the recognition of a temporal sequence of events – what any dumb animal can do, then. Well, that plus quite a lot of emotional turmoil, the ‘hell’ bit. In an article, Bryan Appleyard, discussing the work of Bellow, Roth and Updike, writes the following: “The entire climate and meaning of their work was determined by the possibility and significance of the beautiful, and the way sudden shafts of beauty – Proust’s mnemonic madeleine, Nabokov’s butterflies on a hillside – can illuminate and order the world.” Ordering the world, then. The psychological key to what we are doing, in Dedham or in the studio or workshop. The question then arises: how best to do this in order to minimise loss of content in the process…..

Last edited by Cantab : 04-11-2007 at 03:10 PM.
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Old 04-11-2007, 06:02 AM
cmustard cmustard is offline
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Cantab,

Is'nt everyday life all any of us really have? We just conduct it differently? Some of us make art....some of us sell stocks or collect garbage.

Maybe the beauty of art...music, literature, painting, sculpture, is that in a world so seemingly mundane and complex at the same time, with so many different circumstances.....we're all basically the same and have been for thousands of years.

Our true desire's really are minimal. I think good art gets this.
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Old 04-11-2007, 06:40 AM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Agree with Cantab. Everyday life for every person is an indivual experience. Each person has a part to play in life. Think of each person and what they do as individual musical notes in an opera. You need myriad of individual notes to make the opera a success. Miss one note and that is not fatal. Not great but not fatal. Miss several notes and the whole enterprise fails.

Having said that you can always change the note you play in the opera. Then you will be part of a different opera. For example, I used to work running million dollar projects for a defense contractor. That was one kind of melody. Then one day I quit. Put on the horned helmet, let the hair grow and switched to my own personal opera - art.

Carl
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Old 04-11-2007, 08:29 AM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

I was fortunate to grow up in Chicago and Evanston, Illinois, where there was a high standard of beauty in some parts of the built environment ( as well as quite the opposite ). Having had some good idyllic patterns of beauty to absorb as a child, I had a basis to compare with the negative aspects of life and environment.

In turning to art, in a desire to express beauty, and to create one's world of art in an effort to reproduce some of the images of that inner beauty...I find it ever important to try my best to hold to those standards and express the best of it as well as I am able.

It would be of little use for me to act in rebellion to the ugliness that I see by creating more ugliness as a reflective message.
In my opinion that would not help change things as much as would making the effort to add more beauty to the world. If art is discordant and ugly I think the average mind sees it and goes, " " and moves on. Whereas a beautiful creation gives one a refreshing pause and the opportunity to reflect upon a higher way beyond the mundane.

Those quiet moments of inspired reflection are a gift that we are graced with the ability to offer the world if we choose.

GlennT
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Old 04-11-2007, 09:09 AM
cmustard cmustard is offline
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Glennt

Maybe I missinterpreted what you wrote...but I don't believe beauty can be held to standards of pretty or ugly.
Beauty comes in many forms..sometimes not so attractive. When the soul of something comes through with intense feeling, sometimes that's painful...but intensity of feeling even in tradgedy can be very beautiful.
Your work seems to focus on religous sculpture....is'nt the crucifiction of Christ tradgic, ugly and somehow beautiful ,all at the same time.
I think essentially I agree with what you've said. I think we may differ where we find beauty.
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Old 04-11-2007, 09:40 AM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Hi, While I appreciate these philosophical discussions as much as the next person, sometimes you've just gotta kick it out of the way, get in the studio and work. Lets face it, we are all in and of this world. It may not be the world we grew up in, but it's all we have.
There is some mystique attached to being an artist that some on this sight along with most dillitantes and artist "wanna bes" have bought into.
When the realization that being an artist is mostly solitude and hard work, they run for the hills and sometimes get angry with their artists friends, who it turns out, aren't as "hip" or "cool" as they thought but are just hard working stiffs trying to make good art and a liveable wage.
Yet, those nagging questions, does the work express what I want it to? Is beauty a goal? Is the work any good? etc. always seem to pop up at some point in the process and are a big part of it.
I like what Warhol said, "Just make it, let someone else decide whether it's art or not."
Have a great day,
Jeff
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Old 04-11-2007, 10:51 AM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

cmustard:

I think we even agree on the idea of beauty, in as much as it does encompass some emotions that may not be considered beautiful in and of themselves. The key difference for me is found in the way in which it is expressed. A tragic moment can be expressed with beautiful lines, movement, rythmn, etc. Or the tragic can be exploited to revel in the pain. In the one instance, the beauty raises it to the hopeful or the larger picture beyond the moment, in the other there is no transcendance beyond the pain. In my mind such a depiction should work toward healing the pain, not dwelling upon it .

Still, these are subtleties and I was generalizing on the much larger picture of beauty versus intentional discord.

Okay, Ironman, its back to work I go.....

GlennT
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Old 04-11-2007, 11:59 AM
cmustard cmustard is offline
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Glenn,

Very well stated...I absolutely agree.
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Old 04-11-2007, 04:30 PM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

I'm not sure I agree with you cmustard...sorry. Having come from a background in advertising and graphic design, politely applied arts...bullshit..advertising is about telling lies and graphic design at its best is about imparting information that may be true sometimes...yes these activities are like any other job. Advertising corrupt like politicians, accountants, lawyers etc, etc. Graphic design like farmers, garbage collectors, doctors, engineers etc, etc. Artists, actually it should be different. We should do it even if it kills us. We should believe in what we are doing more than anyone else. We should do it even if it destroys our comfortable lives, our relationships, our families, our selves...otherwise its just a job. A job that allows us to watch tv, wash the car, go on vacation, be a pop star, take the kids out etc, etc. Yes I know we have to do some of these things sometimes. But what we make must come first and as for beauty Cantab yes its the fish on the end of a line or a bird singing etc, etc. But for us its about our vision...I looked at the dump at the bottom of the garden the other day and noticed that the colours of the junk was a beautifull as the flowers in the garden...but it was just an accident...art can be but aint about accidents. We do have a different way of looking at the world than say accountants, thank god. We are different, maybe we have more to offer than everyone else in the whole scheme of things. Maybe we don't. Whatever, but if we don't believe that we are special and have something geyond the norm to contribute to the world then why the F u C k are we tearing ourselves to bits, making ourselves poor and questioning every thing we do when everyone else in the world, a few scientists accepted do'nt seem to give a shit about the world and about truth and in fact admirer lies and the superficial, the banal, uglyness etc, etc. Corr what a rant lol.
John
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Old 04-11-2007, 07:29 PM
cmustard cmustard is offline
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

John,

I see your point and do agree about the differences in people and various professions. I don't agree that artists are so special or understand the world any better than some accounts, chefs, stockbrokers etc.

I believe that in any occupation, hobby, life choice...there are differnet levels of accomplishment....some very creative people, some not so creative. I think an accountant (not every account) can understand the world, feel, and create with thier medium (numbers) as well as an artist might with paint, or stone.

Art is our vehicle.....I think many artists spend to much time trying to prove how special or different they are....and less time doing what just comes naturally and at the same time...recognizing what comes naturally and creatively to others.

As much as we may like to think it...we don't have the market cornered on creativiy or the ability to understand beauty for that matter.

Last edited by cmustard : 04-11-2007 at 07:46 PM.
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Old 04-12-2007, 05:36 AM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Re: post 2. Cmustard -there is a long tradition of , ah, contempt for everyday life in art. I’m thinking back to the bohemian tradition of the early part of the 20th century. The garret, the non-conventional lifestyles, the studio as the heart of life…. Picasso is also famous for referring to art as the means to wipe the dust of everyday life from our lives. I also find the value of the work of the great novelists and poets lies in their complex, conscious engagement with life. Perhaps it is this engagement that I love, and art offers this. Ironman refers to the work in the studio – the work and the thinking through the work, the design process, the thinking and rethinking of the sculpture in progress: all this is vital engagement with life to me, and probably because my consciousness of life is heightened at these moments. (And this is what drugs did in the 1960s – they were ‘consciousness raising’ for many users). Now, I also work for a living in a non-artistic context, where the processes are rather mechanical and routine. My conscious experience is rather more limited in this context. This I identify with the processes of everyday life. Death by supermarket shopping! Death by routine. Consciousness is sacred, I feel, and daily routine destroys it. When I give myself to day-to-day life I feel that I’m throwing something away. Which is why I love cycling and volcano climbing too. There is something either very profound going on here, or, chemically, something that raises us above the ordinary uses of our minds.
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Old 04-12-2007, 06:11 AM
cmustard cmustard is offline
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Cantab,

So you don't believe that anyone outside of "artists" are capable of having profound, meaningful, thought provoking etc....experiences or understanding of the world.

I don't buy it. As for Picasso, the man (yes he was only a man) was full of himself. Most of the bohemian's of the early 20th century were I'm sure high most of the time.

Yes, artists do have a history of contempt for society, establishment, everyday life....that does not mean that they are more "special" or more feeling or more profound or more in tune with the world than any other human is capable of being.

There has been a large myth built around the idea of being an "artist" Do you really believe that other people in other lines of endeavor don't engage in their work with the same passion that an artist might in his?

Don't get me wrong..I love art. I just believe that beauty comes in many forms, some realize it through making art.....some through counting numbers.

I believe it's a mistake to see value only in what inspires you and discount what might inspire other's.

Last edited by cmustard : 04-12-2007 at 06:56 AM.
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Old 04-12-2007, 07:19 AM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Creative, knowledgable, wise people are the soul of humanity. It doesn't matter whether these people are artists, scientists, philosophers, writers, accountants or garbage collectors. Contribute something, no matter how small, that is worthwhile (beauty, ideas, knowledge, emotions, a new way of looking at the previously mundane, etc) and as a human being you've achieved something.

Not everyone is interested in this. Those that are, have no choice - we need to create art, discover new horizons, look at different ways of thinking - even if it's only at our personal level. What our "day job" is, really is not relevant.
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Old 04-12-2007, 03:54 PM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Each person has a need to create, commune and control. Artists, sculptors in particular, tend more to the creative side. One can point out that architects, writers, and painters are also creative. But sculpting is an entirely different beast. The architect visualizes while others do the building. The engineers creative talents are applied in trying to execute the architects vision. The accountants creativity is executed attempting to bring the building in on time and budget.

I have experienced all of the above, but choose sculpting because I could not think of any other profession where one could manipulate the three dimensional world with no preset limits or expectations. It really is the ultimate form of hands on creation in the material plane.

Yes their are parameters, time, resources, studio size and so on. But the sculptor is not defined, (limited), by functionality, expectation, standards, building codes, political correctness, office politics, the pecking order, and in reality budgets and time schedules.

The sculptor gets to be a little god, directly creating small table top worlds in his or her own image, (vision). That is the difference between the sculptor and the creative accountant. Besides creative accounting can get you three free squares a day and a tattooed roomy named Slasher.
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Old 04-26-2007, 09:59 AM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Creativity is simply the desire to solve a problem in a new or different way. It is used by most people on a regular basis and its yields are usually not art at all. It might allow you to fix a busted garage door without buying a new one, substitue one ingredient for another while preparing dinner because you were out of something.
There are established ways of solving most problems that are tried and true. We accumulate experience with these and use them. No creativity here. But when life throws a wrench into the gears and you are faced with a dilemma previously unencountered, the ability to think creatively will get you through.
As artists we see the fact that there is nothing out there in your visual experience like what you wish there would be. So we must put it there. We believe the world always needs new and interesting visual addition. This is a problem. And so we solve it.
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Old 04-27-2007, 05:46 AM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

I sometimes get concerned with the notion that beauty is somehow separate or above 'ordinary' life & that it is a rarified pure experience of sunsets, angels, hearts & flowers..etc. In reality it is nothing of the kind. Life is beautiful. Anyone who has witnessed the birth of a child or has held the hand of a dying person can tell you that. It consists of piss, blood, shit, mucous, screams, moans , laughter & tears. Yet works of art that are made of the stuff of life are criricised as ugly, confronting, lacking beauty - not art.

sometimes
it is easy to forget
there is life
and light
and beauty
in everything
wade in
float....

James

In the following poem by Charles Bukowski you could substitute the word style with either 'art' or 'beauty' as your heart desires...

style

style is the answer to eveything-
a fresh way to approach a dull or a
dangerous thing.
to do a dull thing with style
is preferable to doing a dangerous thing
without it.

Joan of Arc had style
John the Baptist
Christ
Socrates
Caesar,
Garcia Lorca.

style is the difference,
a way of doing,
a way of being done.

6 herons standing quietly in a pool of water
or you walking out of the bathroom naked
without seeing
me.
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Old 04-27-2007, 10:18 AM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

With the regards to the subject of beauty, this is my artists statement in my portfolio:

Albert Einstein spent the last 30 years of his life in search of the unified field theory, the set of equations that will explain the interaction of all known forces. Physicists believe that there are only four forces: electromagnetism, gravity, and the strong and weak nuclear forces. These equations remain undiscovered. I believe that science is failing because it overlooks a fifth universal force; the elemental force of beauty.

We all experience beauty. Each of us uses it to create. Our physical body, spirit and mind are uniquely attuned to perceive, amplify, direct and apply the force of beauty. Beauty is the pure energy field that we use, with intent, to create. It is what the observer is doing to make the quantum particle real. It is the force we use to take the non-entity we call an ‘idea’ and physically manifest it into our four dimensional world.

It seems that the perceived constraints of cost and time have resulted in a great deal of ugly technology. Even so, it is not difficult to find examples of innovative, elegant, and even beautiful technology. I would argue that the difference between the two are not economics or life cycles, but desire, intention and attention.

The beauty energy is abundant and by its very nature easy to use. Its application simply requires intent and focus. The intent, the eye for detail, is the desire to create something more grandiose and beautiful than functionally necessary. The focus needs to be on infusing the heart into technology. It needs to be on creating little pieces of mass produced art. ‘Form follows function’ may get the job done but form and function together artistically expressed is the killer application.

Pay honor to your craft; consider your product a sacred offering to human progress. Engineering wrought of the fifth force will resonate with each of our innate abilities to recognize and emote beauty.

What could be more successful?
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Old 04-27-2007, 11:29 AM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

You mean those eggheads haven't figured out how those forces work yet? What the hell have they been doing all these years, bench presses and deadlifts? I think not.

Let me give them a nudge in the right direction.

Quantities (the sizes of universes and nano-minutea, great vastnesses or tiny finger-snappings of time, etc) exist by their measuring or the consideration of that measuring. Without the measurers IT ALL would go unassessed, physical and temporal entities fading to nothingness with the diminishing perceptions of the perceiver.

SO, and here is where Allens astute observations come into the picture, the prime enabler of all things becomes the "beholder" and its a scientific fact that beauty resides in his eyes. And in accordance with the observations of JamesW before him, the conjuror of beauty is YOU and if the sun setting over the tire graveyard through the haze of the dusk south Cal smog brings you to tears by its magnificence, then it is indeed the most beautiful thing at that moment and just might deserve your artistic attention.
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Old 04-28-2007, 12:17 AM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Full agreement with evaldart, if the tree falls in the woods and no one is there to observe it, then their is no noise. The natural state of the universe and this world is beauty. We as observers choose to experience beauty or to experience the absence of beauty. There is no ugly, only the blocking or denial of beauty. In our natural state we automatically experience beauty. In our busy distracted state we block this energy.

Agreeing JamesW with he appearance that this energy takes is defined by an individual’s or societies agreement. That is what beauty is, an agreement, a choice. The quest, the journey, the going to specific places and doing certain things is not a requirement. Just make an artistic choice.
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Old 04-28-2007, 07:21 PM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Quote:
Originally Posted by evaldart
You mean those eggheads haven't figured out how those forces work yet? What the hell have they been doing all these years, bench presses and deadlifts? I think not.

Let me give them a nudge in the right direction.

Quantities (the sizes of universes and nano-minutea, great vastnesses or tiny finger-snappings of time, etc) exist by their measuring or the consideration of that measuring. Without the measurers IT ALL would go unassessed, physical and temporal entities fading to nothingness with the diminishing perceptions of the perceiver.

SO, and here is where Allens astute observations come into the picture, the prime enabler of all things becomes the "beholder" and its a scientific fact that beauty resides in his eyes. And in accordance with the observations of JamesW before him, the conjuror of beauty is YOU and if the sun setting over the tire graveyard through the haze of the dusk south Cal smog brings you to tears by its magnificence, then it is indeed the most beautiful thing at that moment and just might deserve your artistic attention.
I can't let this thread go further without a defense of science and its languages mathematics and logic.

Both math and logic, as thought processes, are as beautiful as sculpture or the effects of any other artform, physical or conceptual.

Evaldart in the quote above seems to be saying the universe would vanish without an observer, but what minimal observer is required? Human, a mouse, an amoba, a virus, a molecule of DNA or RNA? And, where was the universe before life of any form existed? A state of hypoexistence or potential existence?

Sorry if I'm reading too much into a quick post, but beauty is only one descriptor of existence. I am a more-or-less retired prctitioner of science as well as of sculpture, and I consider science and its offerings among the highest achievements of humanity. Not to pick on evaldart solely, but the general trend of the thread.
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Old 04-28-2007, 07:26 PM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

And, on Allenring's last post, we've go on at length in another thread about the impossibility of one person's knowing what happens in another's head, i. e., the state of his/her perceptions or responses. Beauty can be no more universal than any other human concept.
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Old 04-28-2007, 08:33 PM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Fritchie, sorry if my ribbing sounded insensitive to men of science, but my intentions are usually playful and function as a garnish to next to the meat of my typed ramblings.

I am a sculptor not a man of science but that does not stop me from pursuing with great relish thoughts of the quite unfathomable. And, like in art, just when you figure something out, to great fulfillment, you realize you have presented yourself with even more impossible things to consider. Sysiphusian I suppose.

Varying degrees of self-awareness posess the ability to perceive varying levels of actuality. The universe seems large to the human being and probably not so large to an earthworm, even less-large to entities whose awareness has to fit into a subatomic particle. (and I even know a few human beings who occupy very small universes)

I personally am never pursuing "beauty" while creating but I am very aware that what I am bringing forth is completely dependent upon me. I am controlling what it looks like and how I and others will regard it. To me "beautiful" is a term to be applied to exceptional results or occurences...like a home run, a bent piece of metal, or a tea party with a three year old little girl.
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Old 04-28-2007, 10:16 PM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

OK fritchie let me jump on this with three feet. As a fellow man of science you are most likely aware that Maxwell's field equations for electromagnetism are based on the value 'i', which is the square root of minus one. There is no such value as the square root of any negative number. So 'i' is referred to as an imaginary number. Great, all field equations, the so called "real world" is based on an imaginary number.

I gotta tell ya that that concept was a major reason that I worked as an Electrical Engineer for only two months after I graduated; never went back to it. **personal note: I switched over to mechanical engineering, gotta love that stuff, when something does not work you can beat on it with a hammer, go at it with a grinder or really knock some sense into the silly thing with a hot wrench. Electromagnetic field propagation theory is a black art that should only be taught at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry **

Did you also know that every mathematical equation that includes a time element has no direction? All of Einstein's relativity and cosmology equations have no plus or minus time component, they work equally well with time running backwards. In fact science has no idea of why time seems to go in a particular direction.

Now we are told that all the stuff that we see and experience, all the matter of the 'real' world comprises only 4% of the universe. The rest is made of dark energy and dark matter. Science has no idea of what that stuff is.

I think mathematics has been a great disservice to human progress. It has credibility because it seems to work so well, (on the 4% part), not because it accurately describes the greater reality. Women and men of science have been seduced by math, mislead and limited. When we are not able to explain something mathematically it is discounted, dismissed.

That means we have rejected nearly all of human experience, emotions, intuition, the concept of beauty, (see, came back to this thread :-)), the origins of creativity, spirituality, and all manner of every day physic experiences.

Their is no chronon, a fundamental particle of time. Mathematics has no answer, metaphysics and spirituality all teach the same thing, their is only one time, the eternal now. Your observer goes by many terms, the collective consciousness, humanism, Allah and so on.

The artist in his/her studio that is pounding star dust, the elements formed billions of years ago in the fusion furnaces of extinct stars, is a co-creator with ultimate intelligence. The sculptor uses this god energy, a non linear, non mathematical fifth elemental force, drawing on it, forging with intent, and manipulating it to bend our four dimensional world to his vision.

God created man and man in turn created god in an instant of the eternal now over billions of years so their has always been and their always will be an observer to make the quantum particle real.

Or not.
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  #24  
Old 04-29-2007, 09:09 PM
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fritchie fritchie is offline
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Let me take Allenring's comments first.

"OK fritchie let me jump on this with three feet. As a fellow man of science you are most likely aware that Maxwell's field equations for electromagnetism are based on the value 'i', which is the square root of minus one. There is no such value as the square root of any negative number. So 'i' is referred to as an imaginary number. Great, all field equations, the so called "real world" is based on an imaginary number."


All numbers are imaginary, in the sense that they exist only in the human mind, or in secondary sources produced by the human mind, such as computers mr pieces of paper.

The term "imaginary" as applied to the square root of minus 1, simply means that numbers containing (i) can't be conbined with familiar numbers in the usual way. However, they can be used in math, both in combination with each other, and also in combination with familiar or "ordinary" numbers. The combination of an "ordinary" number, technically called a real number, and an imaginary number is given a new name: a "complex" number. The term "complex" in this definition doesn't mean difficult or anything similar. It's just a specific name, like real or complex. Nothing more complicated than dog, cat, and pets.

To go further along this line is not appropriate in a thread devoted to sculpture, but I want to make the point that math is as real, fertile, and productive a field as art.


Also, "Did you also know that every mathematical equation that includes a time element has no direction? All of Einstein's relativity and cosmology equations have no plus or minus time component, they work equally well with time running backwards. In fact science has no idea of why time seems to go in a particular direction.

Now we are told that all the stuff that we see and experience, all the matter of the 'real' world comprises only 4% of the universe. The rest is made of dark energy and dark matter. Science has no idea of what that stuff is."

On the contrary, equations containing time as an element DO have a specific direction. That's how forecasters follow the paths of storms (with sometimes peculiarly unsuccessful results). Einstein's equation, and all the others that attempt to forecast the behaviour of the world, are approximations or very sophisticated guesses at the way things work. Just like Evaldart's young child putting on shoes and sometimes getting things backward, the universe is a big and complicated thing to deal with for even genius-level humans.
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  #25  
Old 04-29-2007, 09:11 PM
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evaldart evaldart is offline
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Are sculptors supposed to be as smart as Allen? and he drinks 40's too! What a man. Can I be on your team? I swing a mean hammer.
Seriously though, nice post.
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