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  #76  
Old 05-30-2007, 10:44 AM
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GlennT GlennT is offline
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

[quote=Cantab]I donít do REALISM because I have, over my life, a highly developed sense of the absurdity of the world as we Ďpictureí it. And I find art that is realistic (nowadays) just faintly ludicrous. Itís like knowledge has moved on, but the art hasnít. QUOTE]

If our knowledge has transcended the physical realm, what the heck are we still doing here?


But that is not just a rhetorical question. One answer is that we are learning lessons about life and human interactions. We are trying to gain mastery over circumstance. If so, then art that engages these issues using realism is not passe, it is vital.

As for the value of theory in art, I'm with Jeff and evaldart.

GlennT
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  #77  
Old 05-30-2007, 12:42 PM
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Aaron Schroeder Aaron Schroeder is offline
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

For the most part I think the sculpture community is hopelessly out of date in the theory department........The CGI folks have left us way behind. It's all post-modern to me. Things are moving so fast.......any new ground ......yesterdays news. Any more it's " what I want " and " what my client wants ". Theory ? ........Who's talking theory.........You have to talk long and lowd just to be heard by overstimulated, desensitised , heard it all before theory practitioners. Even todays latest and greatest......seems so ...." who cares ". I'm waiting for some fresh theory.......but.......I'm still waiting.
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  #78  
Old 05-30-2007, 02:55 PM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

OK, Ironman - let me try that!
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  #79  
Old 05-30-2007, 03:31 PM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Hold on their ironman I think you are missing a wider perspective here. I spent very little time thinking about or designing my art. Ill bet the same is true of the others in this thread. It just happens. We all know what that means, but I'm guessing even evaldart would have a hard time explaining that in layman's terms, (love to see you try).

But once the art has happened it is serious fun to think about it and ask all of those 600 questions about where it came from, what it is, what it means, and where is it going. I think it is hard to appreciate the aesthetics of a self creation; too close to it to see it. But analyzing it is a means of going in a new direction, a means of enjoying it as if it was created by someone else. One can get the, "oh wow", newness thrill by spending time on that path.

But Cantab what do you mean by never getting over dada and cubism? Dada was an anti-intellectual and anti-art statement that spoke to the silliness of serious society. Cubism is probably a good representation of what a relative world would look like at higher velocity and multiple dimensions which is what I assume you mean by a scientific view. I'm curious, could you be more specific.
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  #80  
Old 05-30-2007, 03:41 PM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Quote:
Originally Posted by GlennT

If our knowledge has transcended the physical realm, what the heck are we still doing here?

GlennT

Wow big guy, the best knowledge that we have has always transcended the physical realm. Data bases and scientific statistics are locked in the physical realm. True creativity is not a evolutionary or incremental taken from the physical realm. It is independent, not bound by, beyond and comes from other than the physical realm. Where do you get your ideas for your art from?
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  #81  
Old 05-30-2007, 03:44 PM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aaron Schroeder
For the most part I think the sculpture community is hopelessly out of date in the theory department........The CGI folks have left us way behind.
Absolutely correct, fully agree.
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  #82  
Old 05-31-2007, 03:23 AM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Quote:
Originally Posted by GlennT
If our knowledge has transcended the physical realm, what the heck are we still doing here?
GlennT
Good question, Glenn. As far as transcending the physical realm is concerned, though, I'm only proposing that my understanding of the images the mind creates for its/our purposes are very well understood for what they are now. 'Realism' is also a misnomer. What we offer by this pictorial method is not real at all.....
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  #83  
Old 05-31-2007, 03:38 AM
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

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Originally Posted by allenring
Hold on their ironman
I spent very little time thinking about or designing my art. Ill bet the same is true of the others in this thread. It just happens.

But Cantab what do you mean by never getting over dada and cubism? Dada was an anti-intellectual and anti-art statement that spoke to the silliness of serious society. Cubism is probably a good representation of what a relative world would look like at higher velocity and multiple dimensions which is what I assume you mean by a scientific view. I'm curious, could you be more specific.
Hold on, guys. I spend masses of time in the studio (my output is high). BUT, do try thinking through the work in advance. The rejection of maquettes, of planning and drawing? You are missing half the fun! And if you can someday, visit Henry Moore's sculpture studio in England. Maquette heaven! And drawings for sculptures that are works of art in their own right. The drawing and the maquette's allow me to think through the issues, the forms, the potential formal problems.

Dada anti-intellectual? But it just happens that all the major intellectuals of the day took part in the movement. Anti-art? Yep. But some great art was made. For me, Dada was about how SERIOUS art is, as a social and moral critique, as a response to the absurdity of war (1914-18) and our existential dilemma. The art and the thinking was radical, but the thinking went on and the making of art went on. There's no alternative. Tucked away in your workshop with the angle grinder? Leaving all the thinking to someone else? Very cosy..... . The heritage of Dada? Beuys in Germany, Warhol in America, and Hirst in England. Art that is intrinsically theoretical AND really good.

Cubism. For me the search for a formal logic of visual representation, of the relation of mass and form as parts of a visual field, detached art from the pretence that art was EVER about representing the world. The science and philosophy of the time were exploring the real nature of things, that lay behind appearances. Picasso did a couple of things with cubism - he established absolutely the importance of the artist's/viewer's perspective on the subject of the work. In terms of the visual field, he set out the foundations for the exploration of the relation of things seen to the viewer of the things seen. Never again, after Picasso, could art propose to separate the seen from the viewer of those things seen. He also established structure as fundamental to artistic activity - finding form as painter/sculptor, not mimesis. Mind you, Cezanne is the master, much more subtle than Picasso, but less of an intellectual (Picasso once said that if he were not an artist he would have been an equally good philosopher, in the tradition of Sartre, I suspect).

Last edited by Cantab : 05-31-2007 at 04:22 AM.
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  #84  
Old 05-31-2007, 09:22 AM
ironman ironman is offline
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Re: Thoughts on the beauty of art

Hi Y'all, Personally, I've got nothing against realism but find doing non-obj work more challenging. Oh, I would just like to add that sculptors like Richard McDonald do nothing for me. I'm bored by it. Technical expertise at that level just leaves me cold.

What does CGI mean?

Allenring, What wider perspective am I missing?

Drawings and maquettes are a big part of what I do, but I am very conscious not to beat a piece to death through that process. I NEVER fully work out the piece beforehand.
But, the only issues, forms or potential formal problems that I deal with are visual and I keep the whole thing open ended, subject to change, otherwise going from the maquette to the finished piece is nothing more than rote enlarging and I hate that.
I try to keep the whole process creative, even going so far as to turn a piece up side down and leaving it that way. If I couldn't keep the creative part in the sculptural process from beginning to end, I'd go back to painting.

Cantab, Funny you mention Warhol, he's the one who said "don't worry about whether it's art or not, just make it. Let them (critics/curators I assume) try to figure it out."
That doesn't sound too theoretically grounded to me.

Have a great day,
Jeff
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