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  #26  
Old 01-09-2007, 08:11 PM
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evaldart evaldart is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

Composing steel sculpture has become very much like drawing for me. Steel bars slashing into place like a drawn line, masses of the same achieving density and opacity in the desired places, lines looping and sweeping beneath the heat at the behest of a cheater- bar and a secure vice. So much that after sculpting all day I have no more ya-yas left for serious drawing. Early mornings are spent sketching and designing for clients, but thats not the art stuff. Things work out best when more than one of your strengths can be tapped to achieve a singular goal. Eventually you can draw whatever you want ...it becomes your thinking.
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  #27  
Old 01-10-2007, 05:05 PM
fused fused is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

You can definitely "draw" with steel --placing lines and forms in space-- a process well documented with the sculptor David Smith.
I do this as well.

Most people's humble artistic beginnings is drawing, it's a common ground we all share. How we develop and use drawing changes as our creative abilities evolve. For some it is the final product and for others it is a tool. It can be the means to an end or the end itself.

In undergraduate school all sculpture students were required to keep a sketchbook and to enforce this it counted for 20% of the course grade. While many students protested, it didn't take long for the realization to set in that drawing is a great tool. Sculpture takes hours, where drawing takes minutes and once you develop a personal vocabulary with line, ideas can be confidently recorded for future reference. A sculptor's drawings about sculpture only have to make sense to the author and can be recorded on anything... even a napkin or a concrete floor.

I don't expect my mind to recall ideas from last month or year, so a sketchbook does it for me.

I laughed when I read Denis's recommendation against drawing on the basis of architectural design. It made me think of Isamu Noguchi's remarks on an ISC panel in Washington DC long ago where he said, 'I enjoy the freedom of making sculpture, an architect is stuck with the design once construction begins and can't turn it over to discover it works better upside down.' Paraphrased and not an actual quote.

I'm guilty of not drawing enough, the huge bump on my middle finger has shrunk.
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  #28  
Old 01-11-2007, 03:54 PM
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evaldart evaldart is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

Fused, I used to have the same bump from paint brushes. Now there are different bumps.
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  #29  
Old 01-13-2007, 04:18 AM
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terracotta terracotta is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

I don't feel I've really seen something until I've drawn it.

For sculpting from an actual model I find drawing essential, but I sometimes wonder if it helps or hurts, as it's easy to try and adapt the sculpture to the drawings. Essential to draw the same thing from many different sides.
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  #30  
Old 01-13-2007, 08:30 PM
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Merlion Merlion is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

Quote:
Originally Posted by terracotta
I don't feel I've really seen something until I've drawn it..
Are you referring to the process of composing and creating a new sculpture, that you have to draw it out first?

Anyway, for me, I notice I have this habit of composing it by visualising it in my head before starting on a new sculpture. I don't know why. It is not that I don't like drawing. It is just that I do not rely on it for starting a new sculpture.
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  #31  
Old 01-14-2007, 02:27 PM
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terracotta terracotta is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

Quote:
Originally Posted by Merlion
Are you referring to the process of composing and creating a new sculpture, that you have to draw it out first?
Hi Merlion, what I meant was that generally I don't really notice things properly until I concentrate on them when drawing them, and then I am surprised by how different they look from how I'd imagined they did.

I don't think I need to draw to sculpt, in fact for me it's good to do at least some work without plans or drawings to see how it goes.

I can't really visualise much without models or drawings. I recall reading that Manet couldn't work without models, so to finish The Execution of Maximilian he needed soldiers as models (or was it people in costume?).

I've read that about 10% of people have a photographic (ie eidetic) memory.
I suspect that drawing works very differently for different people.
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  #32  
Old 01-14-2007, 11:53 PM
artisti artisti is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

Some one spoke of Rodin and profiles and I agree that they are extremely important. Drawing is a way to learn those profile to memorize them and to train the hand and eye so that in the moment, in the act of sculpting that information is readily avaliable.

For the stone carver, working the profile sends the stone chips flying harmlessly away from the eyes. If you carve the stone in front of you and are looking at the front of the chisel, the stone will fly back in your face all day and you end up looking at the stone you are taking away and you hand is covering the all important stone you are leaving. However when you work your profiles the stone flies away from you and you see the actual scupture you are making.

Drawing makes sculpture much easier. because I only have to think about line. one line at a time. If my lines are right my volumes will be right.
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  #33  
Old 01-21-2007, 09:20 AM
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

While drawing has only been celebrated in this thread I know of a sculptor (stone carver, figure, clay) Carl Raven in NJ who has , to my great astonishment , seems to have done away with drawing. He is unquestionably the best I have seen doing what he does (We were good friends and shared a studio for some years). I have watched him produce powerful work time and again with nothing but an idea in his head, a wooden folding ruler, a hammer and a busted chisel. iIn the studio he utilized a rare figurative sensibility, an impenetrable focus (he often forgot to eat drink and go to the restroom 12 hours at a clip) and a relentless physicality (I have never before or since feared a mans handshake). No drawings, direct carving. I know he was hired briefly as a mercenary to workout anatomical issues on that giant Da vinci horse, at Tallix I think. I have been unable to find his work online if I do I will provide a link. But he never seemed to have the time for drawing; it was an unnecessary step in the process. This is not to say he can not draw, just that he never really seemed to need it for his process.
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  #34  
Old 01-24-2007, 09:41 PM
BobClyatt BobClyatt is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

Evaldart,
With that moving description we have to see some of Carl Raven's work! Pls post any links you find, and I'll do some asking around the old Tallix network to see if anyone knows where he is or what he's up to.
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  #35  
Old 01-28-2007, 03:57 PM
classicalsculpt classicalsculpt is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

I work in a representational method of sculpture, with a background in drawing and painting. On my first sculpture study from the live model, I did not have an armature ready, so was forced ot change plans. I discovered the 15 minute clay sketch warm-up was strikingly similar to what we experienced in drawing class with the warm-up drawings. The measuring and proportions, judging angles, etc were really the same principle, only in 3d.
I find the clay sketch exercise forces me to think of the whole form, and to map out my idea or theme. not get bogged down in detail prematurely, even though my work is of a classical realist style.
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  #36  
Old 02-27-2008, 10:26 AM
karenraven karenraven is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

If anyone needs to find Carl Raven his phone number is 347 820 1459. He alive and well working for a company called ATTA Inc.
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  #37  
Old 02-27-2008, 10:27 AM
karenraven karenraven is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

Hi I am sure carl would love to hear from you. Carl Raven 347 820 1459
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  #38  
Old 02-27-2008, 11:09 AM
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evaldart evaldart is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

Thanks Karen, hope alls well. I'll give him a call next time I'm in town. All the best, Matt J.
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  #39  
Old 03-05-2008, 09:59 AM
tobias tobias is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

This may be out of line but lets see some of your preliminary drawings. I am interested to see how they relate to the sculpture you finished with. How about I start. The piece is called entrapped it is in a night club here in town.
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  #40  
Old 03-05-2008, 10:01 AM
tobias tobias is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

became this
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  #41  
Old 03-05-2008, 04:26 PM
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Merlion Merlion is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

They are impressive Tobias. How big and thick are they? Are they laser cut, pressed and polished?
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  #42  
Old 03-05-2008, 04:35 PM
artlover artlover is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

I have seen Carl Raven's work in Sculptural Pursuit Magazine.
His email address is ravencarving@yahoo.com.

Last edited by artlover : 03-05-2008 at 04:56 PM. Reason: none
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  #43  
Old 03-05-2008, 07:24 PM
tobias tobias is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

Merlion I cut them with a plasma cutter (tremendous amount of fun) and the finish is brushed. They are 4 ft x 6 ft. I liked the way the stainless warped after it was cut so I didnt do any thing past there with them. I dont know if any one can really see them in this photo they are vary difficult to photograph in action.
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  #44  
Old 03-05-2008, 09:31 PM
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Merlion Merlion is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

Tobias, I can't help commenting. Your plasma cutting photo looks like one of my light-box artworks.

How thick is your stainless steel plate?
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  #45  
Old 03-06-2008, 09:27 AM
tobias tobias is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

I think it is 18 ga. but dont hold me to this I talked about lots of different guages befor I decided on this.
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  #46  
Old 03-07-2008, 09:33 AM
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Merlion Merlion is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

If it is 18 gage, it is about 1.2 mm thick for these 4 x 6 ft sheets.

It is an interesting combination, the selective reflection due to heat cutting warping, and the shape of the human figures.
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  #47  
Old 03-18-2008, 06:55 PM
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terracotta terracotta is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

I'm not sure if drawing hurts or helps... forces you to look carefully, but you are reducing it to 2D. I find working from drawings when the model is away I tend to focus on outlines, but that is partly because I prefer drawing in contours.

What I really like is the immediacy of drawing, a change from working slowly and carefully.
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  #48  
Old 03-18-2008, 07:53 PM
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HappySculpting HappySculpting is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

Sketching is a way of creating new sculpture ideas. If I can't think of which pose I want to draw, I just quickly scribble a bunch of circles and lines lightly all over the page. Then by looking into the scribble I see something- sort of like finding images in the sky's stars.

When my husband and I are relaxing in the evening, one way we spend time together is by watching a favorite t.v. show that our DVR has recorded. But somehow, I feel sort like times a wasten' when watching t.v. so that's when I sketch. Sketch and t.v. watching all at once.

Sketch it on paper, then sketch it in clay. Have a large number of drawings to choose from. Pick a sketch then play in the clay....

~tamara
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  #49  
Old 03-29-2008, 10:16 PM
Baraka Baraka is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

Drawing is something I'm quite passionate about, as I personally believe that the ability to draw well, and a good understanding of design, are the foundations of any art form.

Drawing teaches you to look deeply at everything in the environment, noticing every curve, every change of light - everything about it that makes it unique. Although a two dimensional form, when drawing, the eye and mentally the hand, is shaping the figure or object in the process. One must understand what they are looking at, before they can interpret it, IMO.

Although I feel that I am accomplished at drawing, I never sit down and sketch out a painting or sculpture. Those are all done in my mind. I hadn't thought of it as meditation, but I guess that is really what it is.

I have a lot of horses. When they are fed, I have some wonderful, "quiet time" as I wait for them to finish before being turned back out to pasture. That's when I do my best thinking. That's the time when compositions are created, and problems solved. It's also when I do a lot of reference work, as horses are almost always a part of my art. Below is an example.

BTW, as a confession, this piece was my first sculpture in too many years. I learned A LOT working on this with the foundry, especially during the patina process. As an example, the muscling that is so very defined in the finished piece, didn't seem nearly so pronounced in the clay. I'll post a photo of the clay for comparison. The piece I'm working on now gives consideration to this characteristic. Don't laugh at the "pinto" effect of the clay. I just decided to sculpt one day, and fished out what I had - which were two different colors of old clay. I guess I got the ultimate compliment when I took it to the foundry. They said, "Gal, if you can do this with this stuff, I can't wait to see what you can do with some good clay." HA!


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  #50  
Old 03-29-2008, 10:20 PM
Baraka Baraka is offline
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Re: Sculptors and drawing

Opps, sorry for the size. I didn't realize they would be so large. Interesting how photographs show everything.
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