Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net  

Go Back  Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net > Sculpture Roundtable Discussions > Sculpture Community and ISC topics
User Name
Password
Home Sculpture Community Photo Gallery ISC Sculpture.org Register FAQ Members List Search New posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-01-2004, 02:28 PM
JAZ's Avatar
JAZ JAZ is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Massachsetts
Posts: 1,776
ISC Fall Conference experiences

At 1:30 a.m. this morning I got home from the ISC Fall Symposium. It was a very stimulating, well planned weekend spent with very good people. Russ gave an excellent presentation on the New Technologies/New Vistas panel (more about that later), in which he mentioned this community, Sam's Dream Tour as an example of the good things that are posted here, mentioned someone named JAZ who was in the audience, and then gave a good explanation of his working methods on the as-yet-unnamed sculpture comission he recently posted here. Saturday night Russ, Fritchie and I went to Fritchie's gallery, where he discovered they had just sold one of his bronzes to someone at the conference. Fritchie and three of us had dinner at a cafe that night, then walked along the Mississippi, looking at the water, the public sculptures there and enjoying the 70 degree evening. (It was 83-90 during the day this weekend). Fritchie gave us many insights into the history, art and culture of his beautiful city of New Orleans. Because it was Halloween weekend there were people on the streets in costume. Bourbon Street was jammed with freaks and ghouls, but we opted for the river. Fritchie and Russ actually are real, not just avatars.

Roughly 200 people attended the symposium(and there was a waiting list), which made it more intimate than the ICS conferences, which I’ve been told have more like 2,000 attendees. This was my first ISC event and I enjoyed every minute. Great networking, presentations, art and locale.

I’ll post bits at a time to give you a quick synopsis (since I’m dying to get to my own work!). There were more openings and other events that I was not able to get to, though I packed in all that would fit in the time there. I took the earliest plane I could get a seat on on Friday, which was scheduled to leave Manchester, NH at 9:50 am. It was a half hour late and it took another hour and fifteen minutes to get by shuttle from the airport to the hotel, so I wasn’t able to register at the Contemporary Art Center in New Orleans until 4:30. We had all been told to bring five slides for an on-going slide loop, and there were iron pours and other demos, all of which had already happened by the time I arrived. But there was plenty more to come.

The first stop was the Virlane Collection Open House at K & B Plaza, which had works both inide (1st and 7th floors, in and among the office spaces) and on the plaza outside the building. Since the building closed at 5:00, two of the images I’m posting here don’t have info on the sculptor, because there was no time. The Noguchi fountain outside was there when the Bishoffs purchased the building and was the incentive for the rest of the collection. Imagine sitting at your desk, on the job, with a Niki de Saint Phalle or a Trova right next to you. The collections started with realist paintings and sculpture (like the Duane Hanson here), but then broadened. These examples will give you an idea of the range. Sorry I don’t have all of the names. The wooden one is by someone whose work I know, but I can’t recall who. I took a photo of base of the stainless being where the name and title were, but it’s unreable.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	ISC---Hanson.jpg
Views:	1059
Size:	18.0 KB
ID:	1239  Click image for larger version

Name:	ISC-Noguchi,-etc.jpg
Views:	1153
Size:	43.4 KB
ID:	1240  Click image for larger version

Name:	ISC-sitting-man.jpg
Views:	1057
Size:	22.6 KB
ID:	1241  
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-01-2004, 02:32 PM
JAZ's Avatar
JAZ JAZ is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Massachsetts
Posts: 1,776
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

One more. The point is that these collectors and the ones who gave presentations during the seminar bought very different kinds of work.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	ISC-stainless-being.jpg
Views:	1033
Size:	28.9 KB
ID:	1242  
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-01-2004, 03:51 PM
JAZ's Avatar
JAZ JAZ is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Massachsetts
Posts: 1,776
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

FRIDAY NIGHT
There was then a wine and cheese reception at the new Ogden Museum of Southern Art, which had opened in 2003. It is a beautiful venue across from the Contemporary Art Center. Excellent schmooze opportunity with atendees from all over. Someone said that they expected this symposium to be mainly local sculptors, and art administrators, but there were also people from New York, Texas, Alabama, Florida, Rhode Island, California, Mexico, England, etc. etc.

The keynote address was by Antony Gormly. He began by suggesting that the ISC is somewhere between a church and a cult in its relationship to artists. He spoke with clarity and passion about how sculpture is key to his life, about the body as the key idiom of the 20th century – “not to be part of a narrative, not as an object, but as a place separating the figurative element of embodiment from its placeness”. He showed slides of his individual work in lead, cast iron, at the seashore, and also sculptural installations that were collaborations with hundreds of people, in Mexico, Sweden and China where the community worked with him on small clay figures (article in Sculpture, I’ll find ref. later). The China collaboration was with 500 people, resulting in 100,000 clay figures. He showed images of Angel of the North, 65 feet high, 54 meters wide (which is posted in our site Images Gallery), and on to a project involving plaster casts of hundreds of people. Using the plaster molds a templates, welders constructed versions of the forms in short lengths of steel rod, like a 3D drawing of each body made of short crosshatched lines. A room filled with these translucent standing bodies looked ethereal, ghostly and suggested the fragmentation of contemporary lives as well as the connectivity that holds us together.

There was a gumbo and jambalaya buffet at 8:15, then we were shuttled to the studio of Carol Lambert and Paul Higham for a studio party. Twelve artists have studios there, and woodshop and foundry fascilities are on site. Carol’s large scale bronze shells, along with small fabricated stainless sculptures and other works by stuio artists were on display. Paul does digital sculpture – both virtual and physically executed using rapid prototyping. (Examples attached. Details of his panel discussion on this later.) He has set up there a computer, triple plane router and materials for prototyping in rayite. There was a performance at midnight, but a few of us went back at 10:30 or so on the shuttle after a full day.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-01-2004, 03:55 PM
JAZ's Avatar
JAZ JAZ is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Massachsetts
Posts: 1,776
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

The first image shows one of Carol Lambert’s bronzes. On the left is one of the studio artists (who makes cast silver jewelry) in the center is Delois Barnes from Conneticut and on the right is Christiane Martens from Illinois. The second image is Paul Higham's "Glider" 3D cellular automata 2002, bronze made using rapid protyping. See Spacesampler.com for interactive realtime version.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	ISC-Lambert.jpg
Views:	1087
Size:	28.5 KB
ID:	1243  Click image for larger version

Name:	ISC-Higham.jpg
Views:	1003
Size:	21.4 KB
ID:	1244  

Last edited by JAZ : 11-01-2004 at 03:57 PM. Reason: right/left confusion
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-01-2004, 09:32 PM
fritchie's Avatar
fritchie fritchie is offline
Sculptor
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 3,456
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

Quote:
Originally Posted by JAZ
At 1:30 a.m. this morning I got home from the ISC Fall Symposium. It was a very stimulating, well planned weekend ............

The first stop was the Virlane Collection Open House at K & B Plaza .......... Bishoffs purchased the building and was the incentive for the rest of the collection. Imagine sitting at your desk, on the job, with a Niki de Saint Phalle or a Trova right next to you. ........
JAZ - This is a great opening summary of the New Orleans Symposium, but I have to make one small correction. The couple honored at this event were Sidney and Walda Besthoff, not Bishoff. K & B in the name of the Virlane site is local shorthand for Katz and Besthoff, the hundred-or-so year old family corporation that eventually became primarily theirs. Getting home at 1:30 and putting this up the next morning, its surprising you could think at all.

On another point, the stainless or aluminum figure is a new one to me, and I’ll have to get the name. The Besthoff’s continually are adding excellent pieces to their collection. Thanks for getting up this description, and I look forward to more postings!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-02-2004, 12:01 AM
sculptorsam's Avatar
sculptorsam sculptorsam is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: MN
Posts: 823
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

Thanks for the updates, JAZ. I hope you're just getting started... you must have a bunch of photos you're just waiting to share with us. How about Russ behind the podium, spotlights blinding him to the rapt audience on the edge of their seat?...
__________________
www.sculptorsam.com
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-02-2004, 06:07 AM
obseq's Avatar
obseq obseq is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 1,700
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

Great read, JAZ. Thanks for all of the detailsa and images thus far.


I'm looking forward to more on Russ' presentation along with the rapid prototyping presentation.

(Fritchie, congratulations on the sale!)
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-02-2004, 07:58 AM
JAZ's Avatar
JAZ JAZ is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Massachsetts
Posts: 1,776
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

[quote=fritchie]... The couple honored at this event were Sidney and Walda Besthoff, not Bishoff. K & B in the name of the Virlane site is local shorthand for Katz and Besthoff, the hundred-or-so year old family corporation that eventually became primarily theirs. Getting home at 1:30 and putting this up the next morning, its surprising you could think at all.
.....QUOTE]

I'm so glad you corrected the name, Fritchie. I'm all fired up, but too tired to do my homework. I'll be more careful with the rest.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-02-2004, 08:14 AM
JAZ's Avatar
JAZ JAZ is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Massachsetts
Posts: 1,776
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

Quote:
Originally Posted by sculptorsam
Thanks for the updates, JAZ. I hope you're just getting started... you must have a bunch of photos you're just waiting to share with us. How about Russ behind the podium, spotlights blinding him to the rapt audience on the edge of their seat?...
Sam,
I'll have to post in pieces because, as you well know from your Dream Tour posts, it's time consuming. So far, that's the capsule review of Friday. After I've posted about the whole weekend I want to write my notes out in sentences and could e-mail them to anyone who is interested.
I took more images than I will be posting, in order to preserve the implied limits the forum has (only three per post, etc., which I already exceeded!) and I did not take any of people on the stage, which I probably should have. I don't normally bring a camera with me becasue my husband is the camera guy, so I'm not really used to thinking about it. The other factor is that the stimulation level was very high becasue you're meeting all of these new people, etc. For instance, a woman is sitting in front of me and she says something and I say something and then she tells me that she is in the market for works for a new sculpture garden at a university in Pennsylvania. I tried to be available for that sort of thing. Also, I wish that I could have taken more notes, becasue these speakers were all excellent - just about everythign that came out of their mouths was useful. But sometimes I just got caught up in what they had to say.
I will post more info tonight if I can get my school work done (class tomorrow). My mother was in a car accident while I was gone, which I found out late last night, so I have to go see her today before going to my studio. Not serious, she's just sore, but a shocker to me anyway.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-02-2004, 08:27 AM
JAZ's Avatar
JAZ JAZ is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Massachsetts
Posts: 1,776
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

Here's one more photo (as I head out the door). Charles Fritchie on the left, Russ Rubert with the angelic glow behind him in back, and me, Joyce Audy Zarins in front. We were at D.O.C. Gallery. On the stand next to Fritchie are two of his bronzes. The male one is the piece that sold.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	ISC-three-of-us.jpg
Views:	988
Size:	26.8 KB
ID:	1245  
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 11-02-2004, 01:47 PM
anne (bxl) anne (bxl) is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Ibiza (Spain)
Posts: 426
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

Jaz, thank you so much for this report and for sharing with us your enthousiasm!
Amazing to put faces on those friendly names....
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 11-03-2004, 01:14 PM
JAZ's Avatar
JAZ JAZ is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Massachsetts
Posts: 1,776
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

Quote:
Originally Posted by anne (bxl)
Jaz, thank you so much for this report and for sharing with us your enthousiasm!
Amazing to put faces on those friendly names....
It is actually, amazing to meet someone one only knows through the web postings (or over the telephone or radio, which also don't usually have an image of the speaker). I think it's basic human nature to try to formulate an image of a face for the people we communicate with digitally (or over the telephone). There was a time when I earned my living writing and illustrating children's books. When I finally met one of the Macmillan Co. editors who I had been working with on one of my books, the first thing she said to me was, "You didn't sound so short!" (Frankly, she didn't sound so tall either!) She had formulated a mental image of what I looked like.
We all have seen pictures of Russ on this site, yet in person he did look different. Funny how our imaginations take over. Anyway, when he was up on the stage waiting with the other panel members, he looked so much more tranquil, composed, and clean and neat than they did....sort of spic and span and organized, like his studio. It was nice. He looked like he knows where he's going, and it's his own way.
And Fritchie looked more like a PhD in Chemistry (which he is) than like your typical sculptor, which I think is very cool. Who the heck wants to be predictable?
Both Fritchie and Rubert are charming and ideosyncratic in their own ways. The best people are like that. Intensely themselves.
JAZ
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 11-03-2004, 10:22 PM
RuBert's Avatar
RuBert RuBert is offline
scupture.net
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Springfield, MO
Posts: 1,422
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

Quote:
Originally Posted by JAZ
We all have seen pictures of Russ on this site, yet in person he did look different. Funny how our imaginations take over. Anyway, when he was up on the stage waiting with the other panel members, he looked so much more tranquil, composed, and clean and neat than they did...
JAZ
Ok so I just got my hair cut.


anyway JAZ, it was a blast to be in New Orleans and meet up with you and Charles. Just to show another look for me, here I am on the left in New Orleans. Next to me is my gal Pam, Richard Heinrich, and Rob Fisher
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	group halloween.jpg
Views:	982
Size:	46.5 KB
ID:	1248  
__________________
Russ RuBert
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 11-04-2004, 01:42 AM
novabelgica's Avatar
novabelgica novabelgica is offline
ISC Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Sint-Truiden, BELGIUM
Posts: 182
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

Hey, it's Russ Ramone!

Seriously, looks like you had a great time there.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 11-04-2004, 11:22 PM
JAZ's Avatar
JAZ JAZ is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Massachsetts
Posts: 1,776
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

ISC Fall Symposium – Saturday

While most of us aren’t used to thinking about estate planning so soon after breakfast, from 9:15 to 10:15 representatives of Legg Mason Wood Walker did a good Powerpoint overview of estate planning for artists. The workshop covered topics including: setting priorities, creating a detailed inventory of your work and constructing a plan for disposition of your work through gifts and bequests. They were corporate sponsors of the symposium and have a very good handle on the financial issues professional sculptors face. If you are looking for financial advice you may want to contact them at 1 (800)526-5778. They are based in New Orleans.

Defining Sculpture, a panel discussion with Willie Birch, Helen Escobedo, Donald Lipsky and Keith Sonnier tackled what sculpture is today… how it can define space (Fred Sandback, Eva Hesse), encompass or envelop, can move or make sound (Yves Tinguely, Lynn Emery), be of the earth (Walter de Maria, Anna Mendietta, Roni Horn), use technology (Nam June Paik, Bill Viola, Dennis Oppenheim) or utilize the body (Carolee Schneeman). Helen Escobedo said that “sculpture is no longer something that you bump into”. She talked about an installation of hers in Germany where she had made 101 “refugees” of hay constructed on vertical supports. Each leaned a bit, making them look like figures migrating. Visitors added flowers or hats to some. It was intended to be a month long exhibit, but three weeks into the show vandals knocked a number of the figures down. Then something spontaneous, something amazing happened. A group of women dressed in cloaks made a dance of lifting the fallen figures and leaning them up against standing ones. It looked as if they were groupings of people helping support one another. Donald Lipsky, who uses found objects, showed images including his installation at the Miami airport where he had dozens of fish taxidermied and arranged in colorful geometric patterns high on the walls. Willie Birch uses papier mache and found objects to make a spirit house, bottle trees and the use of spirit shocks (fragments of mirrors) and Nkesi (I’m not sure of the spelling of these chest cavity containers) to dramatize aspects of African American experience in the hope of motivating societal change.

During the lunch break there were two options available while nibbling on our box lunches: mentoring sessions (with a number of different presenters) or an exhibit walk-through with Robin Levy. I went to the Albert Paley session. He showed slide after slide of incredible commissions he has completed. He talked about starting with jewelry, then going on to candlesticks, furniture, then sculpture, which has grown larger and larger. He started out doing everything himself, and now has ten full time employees. He told the story of his most recent (and biggest) commission. One day a woman came into his studio and saw a cardboard maquette he had made 25 years ago for a Central Park Zoo project that was cancelled. It has plant like forms and several animals. She told him she wanted to buy it. He said, but actually that is just a maquette for something I’d like to build. She answered that she realized that. He said, but when I build it it will be about 130 feet long and 50 feet high. She said, that’s fine. He told her that it would be made of Cor-ten steel and that something like that would be quite costly. She told him that she wanted him to build it so she could donate it to the San Diego Zoo. The finished sculpture will cost $1,000,000 and the plaza it will be sited in will be $3,500,000. It will take ten flatbed tractors trailers to transport the sculpture. He emphasized that artists starting out with public art should concern themselves more with the quality of their work, and the subsequent publicity than with the price.

The afternoon started with a discussion of The Eccentric in Art (isn’t it all?). Jim Harithas represented the museum director’s perspective, Nancy Kienholtz (whose mentoring session was apparently very stirring) and Jesse Lott both focus on social issues in their work in very different ways, and Marilyn Oshman, is a collector with vision. They have in common the idea that art is the key to changing individual behavior without violence. In talking about what she looks for when she buys art, Marilyn said she looks for work that operates out of the mainstream, not for being different, but being authentic. There is art that is contrived eccentric and art that is true eccentric art. She has purchased “The Orange Show” an outdoor constructed space used for creative programs with kids, Ant Farm related work, a Chris Burdon ship, etc. She told a story about Eugene Von Bruchenheim (not sure of the spelling) who is pshychologically impaired by bomb-related emotional trauma, struggling to live in a post apocalyptic world. He is a recluse who constructed “House”, a tower made of chicken bones. He has invented his own reality.

The New Technologies/New Vistas discussion was next. Four artists:Jon Isherwood, Robert Michael Smith, Russ Rubert and Paul Higham were the personification of the span between hand crafted and “gravity free” uses of technology for sculpture. Their goal is to use computers to preserve, evolve and transcend traditional means of artmaking. Jon Isherwood and Paul Higham both use rapid prototyping to generate work. Jon (recent article on his stone work in Sculpture, but I’ll have to find ref. later or I’ll never get this done!) talked about his beautiful stone pieces that start with traditional drawings, clay, then plaster, later digitized. He controls and adjusts the algorithms, has input into the kinds of surface marks the CNC machine carves and he manipulates the surface of the finished stone carving so that his approach is a dialogue with the machine. Paul Higham’s philosophy is to distance himself as much as possible from the handmade. He is after “autotecture” and works that are “resistant to metaphor”. His space sampler series is an international project in which telemetry is used to record the visual data from famous sculptural forms – the one he showed was the head of the Statue of Liberty for “Synthesizing Liberty” – in digital form, he allows the algorithms to convert the data, then uses the rapid prototyping to generate a model that is then cast in bronze or other material. The end product has no obvious visual connection with the Statue of Liberty but rather is its own form, which has arisen without Paul’s physical input. He calls “Synthesizing Liberty” Autoplastic Data Cloud Sculpture and the materials: custom built CNC/CPU/G-Code/virus. We are all familiar with the concept of the “happy accident”, well in a way this method of working seems to be the digital equivalent. His postcard lists two sites for further info: www.virtualsculpture.org and www.spacesampler.com. Good luck with those. They’re a bit obtuse. Russ, our own Rubert, aimed for transparency and clarity in his presentation. He used his laptop to show images on the wall screen of this internet forum to lure more people into our little site. He started by pointing out Sam’s Dream Tour posting and talked a bit about how to navigate and showed some of the images and whatnot. Then he went on to show the process of his latest commission, the as-yet-unnamed stainless kinetic sculpture for North Carolina that we have all seen. He showed images of the drawings, the cut-out parts, his TIG welding and grinding methods and finally the sculpture assembled. There were implied motion shots of kids spinning on the bottom and people enjoying their interaction with the piece. His ultimate message was that the computer is a valuable tool that the artist uses as he/she would any other, as needed, and in conjunction with other methods rather than an end in itself.

From 5:00- 7:00 there were a number of local gallery openings, then two events too expensive for me. One was a $200 a ticket Patron Recognition Gala honoring Sydney and Walda Bestoff, who have collected an amazing range of art and deserve kudos for their support of artists and the public. There was also the $60 a ticket Freaks, Follies and Sideshows Halloween party that Russ’s photo depicts.
In between, Russ, Fritchie and I met at the D.O.C. Gallery, as you already know, then Fritchie and I and a sculptor from Staten Island and another from Boston went to an outdoor restaurant in the French Quarter for dinner. We enjoyed Crawfish etouffe while the band played, people in costume and mule drawn carriages moved in the background, with a funky art car across the street and later went for a walk along the Mississippi where we saw a few more examples of public art, including one by one of the presenters. Fritchie did a great job of giving us insights into local lore and explained about those crawfish that I’d just eaten. Surprisingly, they aren’t aquatic as I had thought. They even come up through people’s lawns! They’re affectionately called “mud bugs”. After Fritchie left, Howard and Geoff and I wandered through Harrah's, the local casino, then mosied back to the hotel. A day really worth living.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 11-04-2004, 11:33 PM
JAZ's Avatar
JAZ JAZ is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Massachsetts
Posts: 1,776
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

Meant to include these. Stainless, large, John Scott. Bronze, don't know who it's by, but it was at D.O.C. Gallery. The art car.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	ISC-Scott.jpg
Views:	887
Size:	21.7 KB
ID:	1252  Click image for larger version

Name:	ISC-art-car.jpg
Views:	890
Size:	46.0 KB
ID:	1253  
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 11-04-2004, 11:37 PM
JAZ's Avatar
JAZ JAZ is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Massachsetts
Posts: 1,776
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

Here's the third one. Sorry.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	ISC-at-DOC2.jpg
Views:	915
Size:	8.2 KB
ID:	1254  
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 11-05-2004, 12:48 AM
JAZ's Avatar
JAZ JAZ is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Massachsetts
Posts: 1,776
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

ISC Fall Symposium – Sunday

At 10:00 am everyone hopped on shuttle buses to head out to the New Orleans Museum of Art where a fabulous exhibit of works from the collection curated by Billie Milam Weisman and a discussion of Sculpture in the Public Arena. The Weisman collection is eclectic and very extensive. Some is housed in Los Angeles, some at the University of Minnesota and Ms. Weisman directs the collection with a mission to making it available to the public. She also has been responsible for cleaning and maintaining the works, to the extent that she and her crew clean the works every week. To give you an idea of the range of the collection, here is a photo of two of Dwayne Hanson’s pieces along with one by Les Christiansen titled “Why should I walk if I have wings to fly?”, which is made of hundreds of shoes.

Bruce Beasley opened the panel discussion by showing slides of his fabrication methods for a 13,000 pound acrylic sculpture and then steel works while referring to public art as “studio free”. He stated that public art generally has some resistance from the public, that this is normal. Art should be a surprise and have to earn its way. Richard Hunt and Albert Paley showed slides of their public sculpture, ranging from human scale to enormous. John Scott talked about the stainless sculpture we had seen down by the Mississippi the night before. On the topic of working with committees, A.P. said that corporate comissions are the eastiest because they are not committee driven. B.B. added that the worst scenario is government commissions because the art must cause the funders no problem – other wise it interferes with politics. R. H. felt that public art is going in many different directions because funding is more available. A.P. again on committee driven decisions, “Put a committee together to design a horse and you get a camel”. And J.S. said that developing your sculpture is a growing process “you have to get a whole lot of ugly before you get some pretty”.

Then everyone headed outside for lunch and a stroll around the incredible sculpture garden, also part of the Weisman collection. Russ posted lots of the images in the Images Gallery, but I’ll add one or two from the park and a couple on the streets of New Orleans.

And then it was over. There were other presenters and other events, but hopefully this sampling will give you an idea of the effect this symposium had.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	ISC-Wings2.jpg
Views:	1003
Size:	44.9 KB
ID:	1255  Click image for larger version

Name:	ISC-public-sculpture.jpg
Views:	958
Size:	36.2 KB
ID:	1257  Click image for larger version

Name:	Kadishman.jpg
Views:	966
Size:	38.8 KB
ID:	1258  
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 11-05-2004, 10:13 AM
JAZ's Avatar
JAZ JAZ is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Massachsetts
Posts: 1,776
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

Russ posted 28 images from the Sydney & Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden in the Images Gallery, but I will add four here. The first is by Arnaldo Pomodoro, "Una Battaglia (a Battle)", bronze and stainless, 1971. Richard Rosenblum's "Adam", circa 1990-95 is a bronze cast made in a laborious process from the root systems of fallen trees. A note from the site map states "An artistic prodigy, this New Orleans-born artist began casting bronze sculpture at age seven." Barbara Hepworth's "River Form", bronze, 1965 encloses a pool of rainwater. Rona Pondick's "Monkeys", 1998-2001 stainless steel, combines casts of the artist's body parts with casts of monkey bodies. The site map sys of this work: "These hybrids embody cultural fears about genetic manipulation and experimental mutation."
These works, all chosen by only two collectors, range from architetonic to earthy, abstract to pseudo-realistic as an eclectic review of contemporary outdoor sculpture.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	ISC-Pomodoro.jpg
Views:	928
Size:	37.3 KB
ID:	1259  Click image for larger version

Name:	ISC-Rosenblum.jpg
Views:	923
Size:	25.9 KB
ID:	1260  Click image for larger version

Name:	ISC-Hepworth.jpg
Views:	1021
Size:	36.0 KB
ID:	1261  
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 11-05-2004, 10:16 AM
JAZ's Avatar
JAZ JAZ is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Massachsetts
Posts: 1,776
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

And the fourth, the Pondick's "Monkeys", which combines traditional materials, both cast and modelled realism, the fusing of forms, and an installation-style relationship to space.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	ISC-Pondick.jpg
Views:	1005
Size:	31.5 KB
ID:	1262  
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 11-11-2004, 09:23 PM
Johannah Johannah is offline
ISC Staff
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Hamilton, NJ USA
Posts: 11
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

It was great to read that you had such a great time at the symposium in New Orleans. It is always good to get such positive feedback. Working at these events means that I don’t get to go to all the parties!! But I did get to go the Gala that Jaz mentioned honoring Walda and Sydney Besthoff. I think Russ has got a picture of them receiving the International Sculpture Center’s 2004 Patrons Recognition Award. It is quite some collection they have and the Sculpture Garden, as you can probably tell from the photos here and Russ’s photos in the gallery, really is fantastic. If you don’t subscribe to Sculpture Magazine you might want to read the article written in the October Issue about the Besthoff collection Collecting New Orleans: A Conversation with Sydney Besthoff an interview with Sydney Besthoff by Pobert Preece.
__________________
Johannah Hutchison
Membership & Development Director
International Sculpture Center
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 11-12-2004, 07:12 AM
Julianna's Avatar
Julianna Julianna is offline
ISC Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Waterloo, ON
Posts: 1,169
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

Wow, Jaz. Thanks for posting all of that. It's a nice way for people like me who are busy and broke to be able to get some second-hand exposure to the conference.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 11-23-2004, 11:46 PM
JAZ's Avatar
JAZ JAZ is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Massachsetts
Posts: 1,776
Re: ISC Fall Conference experiences

Quote:
Originally Posted by JAZ
FRIDAY NIGHT
....at 8:15, then we were shuttled to the studio of Carol Lambert and Paul Higham for a studio party. Twelve artists have studios there, and woodshop and foundry fascilities are on site. Carol’s large scale bronze shells, along with small fabricated stainless sculptures and other works by stuio artists were on display....
Corrections:
I've received an e-mail message from Coral Lambert clarifying some inaccuracies in the above passage. Her name is Coral (not Carol), no artists rent space from Paul and she, and the sculptures of Coral's on display there that night were cast aluminum, not bronze. Somehow I missed seeing the signage and did not meet the artist. My apologies to everyone for this misunderstanding.
JAZ
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Sculpture Community, Sculpture.net
International Sculpture Center, Sculpture.org
vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Russ RuBert