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  #26  
Old 10-13-2012, 04:02 PM
Andrew Werby Andrew Werby is offline
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Re: Clay dragon, paint?

If you want to learn about working with clay, get some actual clay. That art-store crap you started with doesn't count. There are some safety issues involved with using it, but if you don't want to hear about them from us, that's fine - wait until you hear about them from your pulmonoligist...

Andrew Werby
juxtamorph.com
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  #27  
Old 10-13-2012, 05:22 PM
Mack Mack is offline
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Re: Clay dragon, paint?

I've worked with clay for decades. I started with the water based clay in an art school class and used that type for years. Anna Hyatt Huntington introduced me to my first oil-based clay at her studio in Connecticut. She also gave me a great book written by a sculptor friend which I read and reread. The clay she gave me was a plastiline from Italy. When I had a studio in Valencia,Spain, a great Fallero there raved about his clay which he and his family dug out of the riverbank themselves for their annual one or two story contribution to the sculptures of the Fallas Fiesta.
Water-based clay was the favorite of Francisco Zuniga but it has to be kept moist, literally wrapped in wet cloths,for it not to crack and it's messy to work, makes a lot of dust, but holds detail like nothing else. For me now it's non-sulphur plastiline (NSP) from Chavant in RedBank New Jersey esp. their "La Belle Touche'. Soft and doesn't dry out for a long time.
What exactly is it that you want to know about "working' with clay?

Last edited by Mack : 10-13-2012 at 08:24 PM.
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  #28  
Old 10-14-2012, 01:35 PM
bsilverman bsilverman is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: canada
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Re: Clay dragon, paint?

Thanks for that Mack! The clay i have had access too just doesnt hold up. It cracks very easily but more important has no strength and crumbles even after a couple of months. I thought maybe it was because i did the sculpture a little at a time and should have done the whole thing at once.

I did a new smaller one a couple weeks ago at one sitting, that is to say without any detail. I wrapped it in a plastic bag and havent had time to get back to it.

I am now guessing Andrew Werby may be right and the clay i have just isnt any good even thought it costs over a dollar a pound.

I'm pretty busy at work right now and havent had time to spend to experiment more. Also lost a lot of enthusiasm. But comments from others does help.

So thanks.
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  #29  
Old 11-23-2012, 10:16 AM
bsilverman bsilverman is offline
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Re: Clay dragon, paint?

I checked the second sculpture today and it has come apart in many places, there are nearly half inch gaps between pieces with just the wire armature holding it together.
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  #30  
Old 11-23-2012, 03:14 PM
Andrew Werby Andrew Werby is offline
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Re: Clay dragon, paint?

Sorry, but I'm not surprised. Clay that shrinks is not compatible with rigid interior armatures. The armature isn't holding the piece together; it's breaking it apart. If you want to use a clay that dries hard, then forget about the armatures. If you want to use armatures, then forget about the clay.

There are various non-hardening clays that can be used over an armature. They will hold their shape and won't shrink. But they aren't permanent materials, and are used to make models for molds. Those models are usually discarded afterwards; the casting becomes the permanent sculpture.

Andrew Werby
www.computersculpture.com
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  #31  
Old 11-23-2012, 07:19 PM
bsilverman bsilverman is offline
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Re: Clay dragon, paint?

Thanks Andrew, the clarifies one thing about clay and armatures. I dont know where that leaves me at the moment. I havent time to experiment right now. but when i get back to it i will have to consider how to process.

Originally i wanted to just mold the clay and produce a finished something, right now i dont see that as a possibility. I am discouraged.

In the meantime am using woodworking to spend my creative energy.
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