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  #1  
Old 10-05-2013, 05:23 AM
mavigogun mavigogun is offline
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Essence and Development

Here's my conundrum: as oft as not, the essence of a thing that is captured in the sketch is lost in refinement. Drawing allows for conceits of complete fantasy that, were they rendered in the round, would lack conviction. On the page, deceptions are accepted without consideration in exchange for pleasant illusion and...feeling.

I quickly reach this crisis sculpting; the essential gesture is attained with ease- and the struggle becomes retaining it through development of the form. I want truth with an exponent- both in representation AND expression. Is that folly? Accepting the expressive gesture without developed form has the taint of a partial victory- while development that lacks expression is total failure. Is that the risk of reaching for greatness- or just the cost or just the cost of artistic maturity? Or does it reflect a fundamental error of hubris and immature lack of acceptance of personal limitations?
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  #2  
Old 10-05-2013, 03:34 PM
Andrew Werby Andrew Werby is offline
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Re: Essence and Development

I don't think so. There are just certain ideas that are best expressed in a quick sketch, that get lost when you put a lot of work into them. Look for other ideas, which would benefit from deeper investigation and reveal more with further development in three dimensions.

Andrew Werby
Juxtamorph.com
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  #3  
Old 10-05-2013, 06:29 PM
raspero raspero is offline
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Re: Essence and Development

I sometimes envy my painter friends who, as you say, can get away with things that would fall flat in sculpture. The human brain seems to be more willing to give a painting or drawing the "willing suspension of disbelief", that good writers of fiction must master, whereas it demands of a sculpture that it look like something—not necessarily something real, but at least something identifiable.

We sculptors do have a few advantages though, one of which—three dimensionality—I think, makes a good sculpture more alive than a good painting. The tactile sense is quite valuable to a sculptor. I notice that people, women especially, can't keep from touching my pieces at exhibitions.

I think you are right in that there are a lot of things that lend themselves more to drawing than to sculpture, that we are more limited in the scope of the content of our work.

Richard
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Old 10-05-2013, 09:58 PM
Mack Mack is offline
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Re: Essence and Development

I say forget the sketch if you can and go right to the clay with the idea...that way there is no comparing. You either find it in the clay maquette or you don't.
(P.S. I can't draw worth a damn.)
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  #5  
Old 10-06-2013, 06:20 PM
raspero raspero is offline
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Re: Essence and Development

Quote:
(P.S. I can't draw worth a damn.)
Me neither. I thought for much of my life that I had no artistic ability because I can't draw. When I was in my forties I picked up a hunk of oil based clay and made a woman's body. I was amazed at the result.

Richard
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  #6  
Old 10-07-2013, 08:16 AM
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tonofelephant tonofelephant is offline
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Re: Essence and Development

It's great to know that I share a trait in this illustrious group other than an illogical love of unwieldy bulky art. I also cannot draw. Take away my drawing implements - straight edge, compass, & other mechanical toys & I am helpless. No freehand drawing here.
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Old 10-08-2013, 05:11 AM
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obseq obseq is offline
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Re: Essence and Development

I drew/sketched long before ever thinking to sculpt, yet now, never sketch ideas for sculpture, instead preferring, to "draw" in 3-D during the development of a piece.

For some reason, I cannot bring myself to put an idea, slated for sculpture, to paper.
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  #8  
Old 10-08-2013, 06:17 PM
raspero raspero is offline
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Re: Essence and Development

3-D doesn't seem to translate very well to 2-D, nor does the reverse. Just try to photograph your sculptures. Some photographs turn out fine, but all of them completely miss capturing the essence and the spirit of the sculpture.

Richard
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