Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net  

Go Back  Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net > Art Lounge and Gallery > Art Lounge
User Name
Password
Home Sculpture Community Photo Gallery ISC Sculpture.org Register FAQ Members List Search New posts Mark Forums Read

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #76  
Old 05-09-2008, 08:18 AM
StevenW's Avatar
StevenW StevenW is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Denver
Posts: 2,320
Re: "Artist" starves dog for "art"

Quote:
Originally Posted by jOe~ View Post
The nice thing about a statement so stupid is that it clearly shows your bias, and thus your inability to comprehend or be open to the basic facts. But then maybe I'm missing some subtle portion of your thinking as your last line was ..."as if we were never here". Carcinogenic pollutants I guess will recycle, but they may recycle us out of the big picture. That agrees with an earlier statement you made that we will become extinct. So what the hell?
Are you talking about DDT and things like that Joe? Those horrible chemicals that saved millions of lives and were banned because they were found to be carcinogenic and cause cancer in mice in highly concentrated doses? Well apple seeds have cionide in them but it's going to take awhile before anyone dies from eating apple cores, (maybe if they eat a few thousand all at once)...

Since DDT has been banned Malaria has again gone rampant and unchecked and hundreds of thousands have paid with their lives for it, but that doesn't matter to all the nice unbiased folks..

Just let us in your backward military junta style country and we'll give you organically grown corn flakes! Wait, we used all that making alternative fuel... 400 lbs of corn per tank of gas.. Sorry, price of food has just gone up.
  #77  
Old 05-09-2008, 08:43 AM
jOe~'s Avatar
jOe~ jOe~ is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Spokane, Wa
Posts: 3,190
Re: "Artist" starves dog for "art"

Quote:
Just let us in your backward military junta style country and we'll give you organically grown corn flakes
Hell, what am I thinking? Why are we wasting MONEY preventing industrial waste from entering our water supply? Its a waste of MONEY. After all, birth defects and death are part of the natural ecosystem. Acids, exotic chemical compounds, heavy metals, radioactive waste, might just make the water taste better. Heck we might even grow extra arms/legs like frogs. Then we'd become more productive--and escalate the cycle. Of course we might also accomplish the opposite--lose limbs... or brain cells. Where do you get your water? I think somebody might have dumped some LSD in it.
  #78  
Old 05-09-2008, 09:55 AM
GlennT's Avatar
GlennT GlennT is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 4,213
Re: "Artist" starves dog for "art"

I considered adding more commentary on this thread, but then decided I did not want to be called a thimble-headed dinwhutty narn-noggin, or worse.

So, the sun is a-shinin', the birds is a-singin', and the world, it keeps a-spinnin'.
  #79  
Old 05-09-2008, 10:13 AM
jOe~'s Avatar
jOe~ jOe~ is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Spokane, Wa
Posts: 3,190
Re: "Artist" starves dog for "art"

I find it real interesting that when ever there is some art work that people strongly dislike(never the ones they really enjoy), the "discussion" ends up taking extreme tangents. Why does disliked work provoke more debates about significant world problems, or their denial? Glenn may be on to something. It's that pervasive "thimble-headed dinwhutty narn-noggin"ness that art "inspires".
  #80  
Old 05-09-2008, 12:40 PM
Landseer's Avatar
Landseer Landseer is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 2,250
Re: "Artist" starves dog for "art"

Quote:
Originally Posted by StevenW View Post
In fact, chixulub is only one of hundreds of such impacts throughout time and there are far larger ones. The reason chix stirred up so much trouble was because it hit a massive limestone bed, which vaporized and released tremendous amounts of pure carbon and sulfur dioxide. Temperatures around the globe soared to 500 degrees F. for several hours and anything above ground or larger than a cat was basically cooked alive. Those animals that could bur-rough or go deep enough under water survived. The super caldera in Yellowstone is due any time (geologically) which means it could blow today or in ten thousand years, but it will blow and when it does anything in my area near Denver will be vaporized.
Yes, it is overdue for an event, and it could be a big one. There is a crater not far from here;

"...a stony meteorite, over one mile in diameter, weighing about 10 billion tons and traveling about 45,000 miles per hour, blasted through the atmosphere and crashed to earth.

In the fraction of a second that it took the meteorite to penetrate about one mile into the ground, the shock wave created by the initial contact with the surface reached the back side of the meteorite and its potential energy was transformed to kinetic energy, the equivalent of about 10 trillion tons of TNT. An electromagnetic pulse moved away from the point of impact at nearly the speed of light, and instantly ignited anything that would burn within approximately 130 miles of the impact (most of Iowa). The shock wave toppled trees up to 300 miles away (Chicago, Minneapolis, and St. Louis), and probably killed most animals within about 650 miles (Detroit and Denver). The blast left a crater over 24 miles in diameter centered in an area of unimaginable death and destruction.

Today there is no land surface expression of the crater that exists 100 to 300 feet below the town of Manson (Calhoun County), which lies near the center of the crater that bears its name.

The area of the Manson Impact Structure (see map, above) has been known as a geologic anomaly since the early 1900s. At that time a new water well for the town of Manson encountered an unusual sequence of rocks that yielded the only naturally soft groundwater known in Iowa. The first investigation of the anomaly, in 1955, consisted of drilling two research cores and studying rock samples collected during water well drilling in the area. Since meteorite impact craters were almost unknown at that time, the feature was interpreted as a "cryptovolcanic structure," a crater produced by a giant explosion of volcanic gases. The meteorite impact origin for the structure was first proposed by Robert Dietz in 1959 and confirmed in 1966 by Nicholas Short, who published photographs of "parallel deformation features" in quartz grains, including specimens from the Manson Structure. Short concluded that these features constituted incontrovertible evidence of a meteorite impact origin. The so-called "shocked quartz grains" (see photo, below) are produced when a high-energy shock wave generated by an impact passes through a quartz grain, creating thin regularly spaced zones of melting along preferred crystallographic planes. Extraterrestrial impacts are the only known natural force with sufficient energy to create these features.

The area of the Manson Structure has been known as a region of anomalous geology since 1912, when samples collected during the drilling of a town water well at Manson proved to be unlike other rocks in the area. The nature of the anomalous geology remained a mystery until 1953, when cooperative drilling of two research cores by the Iowa Geological Survey-U.S. Geological Survey led to its interpretation as a cryptovolcanic feature (a crater created by a blast of volcanic gas). In 1966, evidence was discovered proving the Manson Structure to be of meteor impact origin.


Recent Investigations of the Manson Structure
In 1991 and 1992 a second joint Iowa Geological Survey Bureau-U.S. Geological Survey investigation of the Manson Impact Structure included the drilling of 12 research cores totalling over 4000 feet (1200 m) of impact rocks. These drill holes were primarily located along an east-west radius of the structure (the line of a seismic profile). Study of the cores and other data showed the Manson Impact Structure to be a very well-preserved complex impact structure, with a large central peak, an outer ring of down-dropped strata known as the terrace terrane, and an intermediate crater moat region ( cross-section). Investigation of the drill cores disclosed the presence of six primary types of impact rocks. These impact rocks include:
  1. Brecciated crystalline rocks --large blocks of brecciated basement rocks (granites and gneisses) that form the core of the central uplift .
  2. Crystalline-clast breccia with sandy matrix --smaller brecciated blocks of crystalline basement rocks in a matrix of sand- to silt-size fragments of these rocks (photomicrograph ).
  3. Crystalline-clast breccia with melt-rock matrix--smaller fragments of crystalline basement rocks in a matrix dominated by finely powdered crystalline rocks and impact melt-rocks.
  4. Keweenawan shale-clast breccia--a breccia dominated by large to small blocks of black Precambrian (Keweenawan) age shale and melt-rock in a matrix of black shale and melt-rock grains.
  5. Overturned ejecta flap--an overturned sequence of clastic sedimentary rocks ranging in age from Precambrian (Keweenawan) through Devonian.
  6. Phanerozoic-clast breccia--a breccia dominated by Cretaceous and Paleozoic clasts in a shale matrix.The first four of these impact rocks types were found only on the central peak, and the overturned ejecta only on the terrace terrane, but the Phanerozoic-clast breccia was the uppermost unit in all terranes of the crater.
  #81  
Old 05-09-2008, 01:50 PM
sculptor's Avatar
sculptor sculptor is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: IOWA
Posts: 1,493
Re: "Artist" starves dog for "art"

Quote:
Why does disliked work provoke more debates about significant world problems, or their denial?
interesting observation

as/re climate change
I used to say "Ghia bred us to be the lords of fire precisely so that we could aid in global warming." But too many folks looked me as though i were nuts.
Global warming is a good thing if survival of the currently extant diversity of life is a good thing. Our biosphere needs the extra warmth as an anti-extinction cushion.

We are still in an ice age---just in an interglacial respite.
When Tobo blew it's top circa 70-75,000 years ago(during a period of glaciation), it chilled the world enough to create mass extinctions, almost wiping out our species and hundreds of others.
Graphs of historical climate change show that we are nearing another period of glaciation.
If we can help the earth warm another 10 degrees, perhaps we can avoid or at least delay the next glaciation, and perhaps warm our shared planet enough to lessen the effects of the next "Tobo"

Of the 400 odd recent millions of years of our developing biosphere, the antarctic has only been frozen for the past 15 and/or 35 million years, and the arctic has only been frozen over for the past 3 million years.
This ain't normal for our planet. It's too damned cold.

As for horses doing the work of modern machinery--------a horse needs 6-10 acres of land for pasture and winter fodder. On the same acreage, we can grow enough crops to feed twice the number of people. We simply do not have the extra arable land to support that many horses.

Go Global Warming
Kill the Frost Giants

If you believe that mankind has the power to negatively effect our biosphere, you must also believe that we have the power to positively effect our biosphere.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	65_Myr_Climate_Change.jpg
Views:	194
Size:	42.6 KB
ID:	8400  Click image for larger version

Name:	Ice_Age_Temperature.png
Views:	196
Size:	26.6 KB
ID:	8401  
  #82  
Old 05-09-2008, 07:41 PM
Landseer's Avatar
Landseer Landseer is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 2,250
Re: "Artist" starves dog for "art"

Quote:
Originally Posted by sculptor View Post
the arctic has only been frozen over for the past 3 million years.
This ain't normal for our planet. It's too damned cold.

As for horses doing the work of modern machinery--------a horse needs 6-10 acres of land for pasture and winter fodder. On the same acreage, we can grow enough crops to feed twice the number of people. We simply do not have the extra arable land to support that many horses.
Too cold is right and we humans are so damn ill equipped biologically to deal with it without resorting to BURNING stuff just to survive that it's not funny- yet polar bears thrive in the arctic and swim in water that would kill you in a minute, while camels can live quite well in 120 degree desert with little water- yet a person dropped off in Death Valley with no clothes or water would be dead quickly after developing severe sunburn and dying of thirst.
As far as horses go ,we already waste HUGE quantities of land, water AND food-grains and so forth on CATTLE for meat. It's been published around that as I remember it- it takes about 6 pounds of grain and so on to make ONE pound of beef, the caloric losses in the "conversion" are bad 6:1 along with thousands of gallons of water per cow which in places is getting more scarce- California etc where there are droughts, wildfires etc.
Get rid of raising millions of cows for beef and feed 6 times as many people with the grain and feed wasted on fattening up cattle.

Quote:
If you believe that mankind has the power to negatively effect our biosphere, you must also believe that we have the power to positively effect our biosphere.
Its not as simple as that, sort of like how one man can set a fire that burns down an entire city, but could never rebuild all that was destroyed by himself.
  #83  
Old 05-09-2008, 09:07 PM
steponmebbbboom steponmebbbboom is offline
Level 6 user
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 127
Re: "Artist" starves dog for "art"

Quote:
Originally Posted by jOe~ View Post
I find it real interesting that when ever there is some art work that people strongly dislike(never the ones they really enjoy), the "discussion" ends up taking extreme tangents. Why does disliked work provoke more debates about significant world problems, or their denial? Glenn may be on to something. It's that pervasive "thimble-headed dinwhutty narn-noggin"ness that art "inspires".

that is EXACTLY why this forum has gone right down the toilet.
  #84  
Old 05-09-2008, 09:17 PM
steponmebbbboom steponmebbbboom is offline
Level 6 user
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 127
Re: "Artist" starves dog for "art"

Quote:
Originally Posted by sculptor View Post
As for horses doing the work of modern machinery--------a horse needs 6-10 acres of land for pasture and winter fodder. On the same acreage, we can grow enough crops to feed twice the number of people.
Oh yeah?

With what? oil-based fertilizer? fertilizer that is made from OIL, oil that is in terminal decline? oil that those same horses don't need a DROP of?

what a bunch of horses**t.
  #85  
Old 05-09-2008, 09:21 PM
grommet grommet is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 4,279
Re: "Artist" starves dog for "art"

Well, if something is perfect, there's not too much to discuss. If it's fabulously orgasmically perfect there's more to discuss. Otherwise you say isn't that nice? Why yes, that's nice-- pass the clotted cream please.
Something unpleasureable is more likely to spur someone into action than something mildly pleasureable, because you want it to go away, or to fix it so it's not unpleasureable. Just a small thought. The tangents, well once you're rolling...
One man's toilet is another rat's portal to... whatever. Don't forget to wash your hands.
__________________
Taking my own advice
  #86  
Old 05-09-2008, 10:24 PM
steponmebbbboom steponmebbbboom is offline
Level 6 user
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 127
Re: "Artist" starves dog for "art"

clotted cream indeed. whatever-your-name-is.
dont forget to wash your hands before spitting in my food.
  #87  
Old 05-09-2008, 10:30 PM
grommet grommet is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 4,279
Re: "Artist" starves dog for "art"

that's just nasty.
__________________
Taking my own advice
  #88  
Old 05-09-2008, 10:37 PM
obseq's Avatar
obseq obseq is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 1,700
Re: "Artist" starves dog for "art"

As this thread has gone wildly off-topic and continued into volleys of personal barbs, it is now closed.

If anyone wishes to continue discussion concerning consumption/sustainability, please create a new thread in the Art Lounge.

Thanks.
Closed Thread


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Sculpture Community, Sculpture.net
International Sculpture Center, Sculpture.org
vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Russ RuBert