Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net  

Go Back  Sculpture Community - Sculpture.net > Sculpture Roundtable Discussions > Sculpture Community and ISC topics
User Name
Password
Home Sculpture Community Photo Gallery ISC Sculpture.org Register FAQ Members List Search New posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-16-2009, 05:41 PM
Maddie Maddie is offline
Level 1 user
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 2
Exclamation HELP SAVE SCULPTURE AT THE ONTARIO COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN!

I am a student at OCAD (Ontario College of Art & Design). I am posting this in the hopes that I can gain your support. OCAD has announced they are planning to shut down their bronze casting foundry. As a sculpture student, I am devastated by this news. The school has been moving towards design, and I fear that closure of the foundry will destroy OCAD's reputation as a choice school for fine art studies.
For anyone that would like more information, my email is maddie_madelaine@hotmail.com. There is also a facebook group called "SAVE THE OCAD BRONZE FOUNDRY!" which currently has over 500 members. OCAD students and alumni, as well as concerned artists and members of the community have posted their thoughts on this issue. We can use as much support as possible!
Thank you.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-17-2009, 09:27 AM
marblecutter's Avatar
marblecutter marblecutter is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: el paso texas
Posts: 432
Re: HELP SAVE SCULPTURE AT THE ONTARIO COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN!

Work by a notable Alumna, Lea Vivot
Titled The Bench of Vice
Location: Prague
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	800px-Sculpture_Lea_Vivot_Bench_of_Vice_Prague_01.jpg
Views:	834
Size:	79.8 KB
ID:	10774  
__________________
"Every time I make a mistake I fall into the abyss of learning something New"
claude montes
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-11-2009, 09:15 AM
obseq's Avatar
obseq obseq is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 1,700
Re: HELP SAVE SCULPTURE AT THE ONTARIO COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN!

Maddie,

Do you have an update for us?
Seems like sculpture programs are getting dropped left and right!

Very sad to see.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-11-2009, 11:49 PM
KelEG's Avatar
KelEG KelEG is offline
Level 4 user
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: BC Canada
Posts: 56
Re: HELP SAVE SCULPTURE AT THE ONTARIO COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN!

By coincidence I was looking at the course outline for a sculpture program at the longest existing Vancouver BC art school and it was incredibly vague (didnt even cover figure mold making) when compared with a counterpart in Toronto.

I used to always get asked where I learned to work with oil based clay and molds(the school of DIY).
The idea of figure mold making in BC tends to be earthen clay prototypes only and plaster molds. Not much in the way of formal training at any school. Too bad about Ontario.

It seems like a different world compared to the West Coast when it comes to traditional sculpting technique.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-12-2011, 10:53 PM
thegnome's Avatar
thegnome thegnome is offline
Level 4 user
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: California
Posts: 50
Re: HELP SAVE SCULPTURE AT THE ONTARIO COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN!

I found this sad but not uncommon.... unfortunately. At the school that I graduated from, and where I volunteer at, the metal foundry is always under attack thru meetings and red tape. All we can do is support where one can. Californina I might add is the worst offender toward their state universities. The public sculpture displayed is in poor shape and its restoration.... I may see if I can get one piece I care about a great deal restored this year. unfortunately my car has been a problem and my mechanic refused service for no good reason after taking our money. If any one is in California steer clear or Shattuck's automotive. In any case, what is wrong with people today?!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-20-2011, 01:13 PM
KatyL KatyL is offline
Level 9 user
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Clovis, New Mexico
Posts: 269
Re: HELP SAVE SCULPTURE AT THE ONTARIO COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN!

Is this really a bad thing?

These days many teachers of 3-d have no idea how to do it anyway. Mold making is a deep mystery. No one knows anatomy. Etc.

I see it as a great opportunity for do-it-yourself foundries. I also feel that anyone wishing to become expert at these things (sculpture, metal work, carving, etc.) ought to just strike out on their own. Save all that money you'll never be able to pay back. Get a real degree and a real job.

I do not know if any of you are this old, but I know many old time artists, for example, those who went to college in the 1940's made their own tools. They made their own forges. They got together and formed artist groups and hired their own art models. They got together and poured their own bronzes. (What schools taught was usually out of step, and out of date with the art scene of the time anyway).

What I see in art these days among artists is a kind of learned helplessness, and prostration before the "specialists" of academia. All "school" does, really, is gather the techniques you may need to learn to do some artistic act (i.e. "sculpt," paint, etch). This is fine and good, but really, most of that information is readily available in books. You do not need to be taught any of this, but you do need to learn it.

Other than that -- why do you need to sit in a classroom looking at slides from work that was done in the past? What, get critiques from students who also do not know what they are doing? Be taught by a teacher who has no time to do any art, and who maybe was in one decent show but otherwise sells the occasional work at a small co-op gallery downtown?

(I do have plenty of classroom hours in art, and they were helpful, but most of the stuff I learned was mere "technique" that I could have picked up anywhere).

Beside this, what reason is there to have a "sculpture" program. Will sculpture cease to exist if there are no programs?

I'd say No. In fact, you would eliminate a lot of potential competition-- and (the best thing) you'd eliminate those "sculptors" who think that getting a dead rat and bottle of piss is the equivalent of somehow "making" sculpture. You know the types I mean.

Sorry I am so opinionated. I kind of like the idea of less art schools. I'd like to see a lot less insufferable academics, and a lot more "shoulder to the grindstone"-type artists.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-11-2011, 04:14 PM
cheesepaws's Avatar
cheesepaws cheesepaws is offline
Level 10 user
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,137
Re: HELP SAVE SCULPTURE AT THE ONTARIO COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN!

Quote:
Originally Posted by KatyL View Post
Is this really a bad thing?

Sorry I am so opinionated. I kind of like the idea of less art schools. I'd like to see a lot less insufferable academics, and a lot more "shoulder to the grindstone"-type artists.
Yay….another post that points a finger at “the institution” because of a personal dislike for contemporary art. It is one thing to have an opinion and another to have an informed opinion. You appear to have the former.

The image you paint of the “insufferable academic” is both laughable and fictional.
It is a shame that you feel the need to support any substantive criticisms you might have with unfounded slander. I’ve been teaching for many years and am colleagues with a lot of fine (and young) instructors and professors who teach sculpture. I have yet to meet a single one who was not adequately familiar with mold making and figurative sculpture modeling (among MANY other traditional practices). That said, I know tons from the generation you laude who have never lifted a finger to learn the basics of CAD modeling and even more who are unaware of the shift in both teaching and contemporary studio practices to encourage media inclusiveness in art (really, since the 1950s.)

It DOES take more than a degree from the school of hard knocks and diploma from nose-to-the-grind-stone U. Visual culture, the structure of education and sculpture as a field has changed. You may have to accept that if you expect to participate.

Did you read the thread starter? The OP was pleading for a school to KEEP a facility that supports traditional practices and encourages a strong sense for community through a labor-intensive process. Based on your post – I’d of guessed you’d agree that keeping the foundry was a GOOD thing.

Last edited by cheesepaws : 10-11-2011 at 05:08 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-11-2011, 10:48 PM
obseq's Avatar
obseq obseq is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 1,700
Re: HELP SAVE SCULPTURE AT THE ONTARIO COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN!

Quote:
Originally Posted by cheesepaws View Post
It DOES take more than a degree from the school of hard knocks and diploma from nose-to-the-grind-stone U. Visual culture, the structure of education and sculpture as a field has changed. You may have to accept that if you expect to participate.
Exactly. While I have many complaints from my BFA experience, Fine Art in Academia is one of the rare areas where a student can definitively synthesize the curriculum at hand as it suits her/his aesthetic--
Discarding the noise and absorbing the valuable information. The nose-to-the-grindstone/school-of-hard-kocks experience has yielded the same amount of obnoxious "noise" as I found in Academia. Just different packaging.

Coming from a different discipline before focusing on art (let alone committing to sculpture), Fine Art is one of the lone (remaining) havens for free thought for those going through any University/College system.
The onus remains firmly on the student to put it to good use.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-13-2011, 07:51 AM
KatyL KatyL is offline
Level 9 user
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Clovis, New Mexico
Posts: 269
Re: HELP SAVE SCULPTURE AT THE ONTARIO COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN!

[quote=cheesepaws;100195]Yay….another post that points a finger at “the institution” because of a personal dislike for contemporary art. It is one thing to have an opinion and another to have an informed opinion. You appear to have the former.

The image you paint of the “insufferable academic” is both laughable and fictional.
It is a shame that you feel the need to support any substantive criticisms you might have with unfounded slander. I’ve been teaching for many years and am colleagues with a lot of fine (and young) instructors and professors who teach sculpture. I have yet to meet a single one who was not adequately familiar with mold making and figurative sculpture modeling (among MANY other traditional practices). That said, I know tons from the generation you laude who have never lifted a finger to learn the basics of CAD modeling and even more who are unaware of the shift in both teaching and contemporary studio practices to encourage media inclusiveness in art (really, since the 1950s.)

It DOES take more than a degree from the school of hard knocks and diploma from nose-to-the-grind-stone U. Visual culture, the structure of education and sculpture as a field has changed. You may have to accept that if you expect to participate.

Did you read the thread starter? The OP was pleading for a school to KEEP a facility that supports traditional practices and encourages a strong sense for community through a labor-intensive process. Based on your post – I’d of guessed you’d agree that keeping the foundry was


Bla bla bla. Keep that freak flag flying, Mr, Irate.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Sculpture Community, Sculpture.net
International Sculpture Center, Sculpture.org
vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Russ RuBert