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  #1  
Old 10-23-2007, 02:17 PM
funkadelic funkadelic is offline
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Yet another tool question: Core Drills

On to the next piece of my stone-shop puzzle: core drilling...

Again I am looking for something economical, but sadly most core drilling equipment seems to run well over $1000 for anything with a base, and $700+ for handheld... not to mention the cost of the bits. Are there any good online sources for used tools besides ebay?

Any general advice? A company called MK Diamond seems to be the leader in this market - anyone have experience with their stuff?

Many thanks as always! The advice I have received here has helped me to be much more confident in my purchasing decisions.

--Funk
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  #2  
Old 10-26-2007, 10:47 PM
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dondougan dondougan is offline
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Re: Yet another tool question: Core Drills

I have been carving for thirty years or so and rarely have felt the need for a core-drill bit (at least when I had money in my pocket). I won't say the core bit isn't useful, but all I ask is 'Is it necessary?'

There is always another way to solve the problem in my experience.

Multiple drill holes in a circular pattern, followed by larger bits in the same pilot holes will remove a 'core' of twelve inches or more (see picture below). 20-inch thick block of Indiana limestone, drilled from two sides with regular masonry drill bits. This was the 'discard' which graces my garden.

Not a perfect cylindrical core, but it was going to be carved further anyway, so it didn't matter . . . did it?

Don (skinning the cat another way)
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  #3  
Old 10-29-2007, 12:58 AM
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desertrock desertrock is offline
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Re: Yet another tool question: Core Drills

You can purchase a waterfeed adapter with 5/8-11 threads. This handy unit fits into a standard drill chuck. The 5/8-11 thread is the standard thread rating for diamond core drill bits. A good strong drill, 8 amp minimum is recommended, as is at list a 1/2" arbor or shank for the waterfeed adapter. They run around $75- $150 and will handle bits up to 2" for handheld drilling. Over time the shank will lose it's roundness from removing and rechucking causes some vibration. I used one for a year and got hundreds of feet of 1 1/4" core drilling out of it. The diamond core drills cause very little vibration. Good tool. I use it often.

Mark
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  #4  
Old 10-29-2007, 12:32 PM
John M John M is offline
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Re: Yet another tool question: Core Drills

Funk,

You can use a core drill like the Multiquip CDM-1H with great results.

http://www.cessco.us/MQ/cdm_1h.html

I have this exact same unit I bought from these folks in 2005, and I've drilled hundreds of holes with it, anywhere from 1" to 3 1/2"...as deep as 10" in solid concrete, stone etc with no problems. They also sell nice bits on that site. You should be able to completely outfit yourself with a drill kit, water tank and hose and a couple bits for $800.00. I can honestly say it's one of the best portable power tools I've ever owned...and fwiw I've owned and used a lot of power tools over the last 25 years. You can also get a a nice portable system for less that 100.00 that you can take anywhere. Ask for

91004CCV Spray Can $75.40

4100506FT Hose $14.95

It's a good quality hand pressurized garden srayer can and hose that will fit your tool and allows you to drill without having to have a hose nearby. I've taken 5 Gallon buckets on site at times when water was inaccesible. Also, if you price renting diamond tipped core bits against buying them, there's no comparison. I always buy, and have the fredom to drill when and where I want without having to deal with the hassle of renting and returning.

Hope this helps...Best of Luck to you,

John
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  #5  
Old 10-30-2007, 12:07 PM
funkadelic funkadelic is offline
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Re: Yet another tool question: Core Drills

Thanks people!

The Multiquip looks great.

I notice that a company called FLEX also seems to be a big player in this area... any comments on them?

This one in particular: http://www.amazon.com/BHW1541-Factor...65372&sr=1-169
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  #6  
Old 10-30-2007, 03:34 PM
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evaldart evaldart is offline
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Re: Yet another tool question: Core Drills

I use a hand-held Hilti TE 15 with Hilti diamond core bits up to three inches. I keep a gallon jug next to the hole with a puncture that "feeds" the area with water. Bigger puncture - more water. Works great on everything except granite (which just cuts so slowly its maddening). Drill was 550 ten years ago and the a 16" long core bits average a hundred bucks each.
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