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  #1  
Old 05-27-2003, 06:28 AM
slintfan slintfan is offline
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Wink I've gotta question for ya'

I have a hard time calling myself a sculptor. And that is because I think it is a little silly, at this stage in art history, to delineate between painting, sculpture, installation, land art, and/or drawing. Maybe I have this outlook becuase my work is physically broad, touching on each of these at one point--but remains linked (I can only hope) by concept, path, and style.

When first entering grad school I found it a little strange that most programs where whole-heartedly encouraging cross-disciplinary activity, yet I still was forced to make the decission of which field to enter.

Yeah, I mean, some stuff is flat, some stuff is not, some stuff is illusionistic, some stuff is idea--but isn't it all just stuff?

When asked what I do, I say I am an artist.

Do any of you feel a bit limited by the "S" word? or am I just making a non-point?


Bradfordtheslintlover

What about music? Does it drive any of you like it does me? Sorry, didn't mean to "double-thread". Does any one like the band Slint? godbless
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  #2  
Old 05-27-2003, 06:04 PM
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Araich Araich is offline
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I used to think I was a painter. I was cured.

Nah, calling yourself a sculptor is far from limiting. In fact of all the titles more specific than 'artist' it is the most free.

You make a good point however.

Personally I like 'sculptor' but if I decide to put on a tutu and dance about waving my hairy arms to chiming bells in creative persuit I may reconsider.

The problem with 'artist' is that it is now somewhat diluted, and covers everything under the sun, including footballers.

But most important of all, is that to find work dealing with concerns similar to my own, I must either wade through 95% other concerns, or look for the word sculpture.
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  #3  
Old 05-29-2003, 01:07 AM
emosher emosher is offline
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Araich-
great reply, and quite honestly if you do dress up in that tutu and dance around it might still be considered "sculpture," since it seems that anything that takes up three dimensional space is considered sculpture. consider the broad range of topics which are covered in sculpture magazine.
i do tend to shy away from using too specific a term, as too often people expect sculptors to be working in more traditional materials and more traditional forms. but then installation artist often takes a lot of explaining as well. i also agree that artist covers such a wide swath in this culture. i had an acquaintance comment once that i was the only artist she knew who actually created any work.
lately i have heard the term "professional artist" which i guess has the right meaing - an artist who *attempts* to earn a living at their art, but it is a very strangely egotistical term.
i tend to just throw out whatever seems right for the recipient.
as for the grad schools i agree that they tend to pigeon hole, i actually went to a fairly renassaince school, and i imagine they continue to improve, but when i was interviewing there were a couple that wouldn't even allow you to take classes outside of your major. i found that shocking.
if anyone comes up with a great new term i would be happy to help propagate!
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  #4  
Old 06-04-2003, 02:29 PM
Aurora Aurora is offline
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To non artists, I say I am an artist (because they don't usually care)
To painters, I say I am a sculptor (because I sculpt better)
To sculptors, I say I'm an artist (and compare notes)
To people who say I'm crafty....I cringe.
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  #5  
Old 06-04-2003, 03:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Aurora
To non artists, I say I am an artist (because they don't usually care)
To painters, I say I am a sculptor (because I sculpt better)
To sculptors, I say I'm an artist (and compare notes)
To people who say I'm crafty....I cringe.




Wouldn't this make a terrific t-shirt? :-)




Well said, Aurora.
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  #6  
Old 06-04-2003, 11:13 PM
slintfan slintfan is offline
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Yes it would. Well put. I guess my problem is that I do a little of each, so I'll stick with the broad "tag". thanks for the lines.
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  #7  
Old 06-05-2003, 01:39 PM
Georges Georges is offline
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Sculpture.org Portfolio and "Sculpture"

I am an artist. I have a degree in 3D Computer Animation. I am a trained fine art jeweler. I have made literally thousands of one-of-a-kind 3D artworks. Yet, I would not have said that I am a sculptor before I started posting the Portfolio's on Sculpture.org about a year ago.

Initially, I was "confused and amused" by the broad definition of sculpture that must be applied to include the 620 + sculptors who have posted work on the site. My mind stretched and I began to see vague patterns that seemed to justify the broadness of the definition. I think I can tell the layman why a stroke of paint on a tree could be construed as "sculpture".

But, as Web Administrator planning an overhaul of the site to upgrade the search and sort capabilities; it becomes a little more challenging to the mind and less "amusing", per se. Anyone who has used even the best search engines eventually understands that.

But, let's say you can classify yourself as a "sculptor" - even under the broadest of definitions. Well, what kind of sculpture do you sculpt? Abstract? Figurative? Conceptual? Representational? Abstract Figurative? Abstract Conceptual? Sound ludicrous after a while?

Yet I must make these determinations as concientiously as possible so that a search for an "abstract figurative bronze sculptor in the mid-atlantic region" actually narrows down the contents of a very large website to a list of references that will aid the searcher in finding what it is they are looking for without leaving out an appropriate choice.

"Creativity" can be defined as the ability to make a previously unmade association between two or more disperate concepts or things. Sounds like the opposite of the ability to label, sort and file.

But, I ask you, how does this help me pigeonhole the diverse work of multi-dimensional, associative thinkers enough to make a search engine that can help find them?

Oh, the humanities!
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  #8  
Old 06-24-2003, 08:45 PM
davem davem is offline
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I don't know what to call myself other than a guy that wants to make art and not be told by three clients that they have to use Red because its their kids favorite color. I like to express my vision through my art not someone else’s... therefor I'm an artist. It really doesn't (or shouldn't) matter if the term is over used... artists have owned for centuries, we make art, we're artists.

It reminds me of the tread talking about if "art is of our time" or something like that...history will certainly define who we are, what our art has contributed, and in what medium, movement, etc.

As for you georges, all I can say is good luck.

I volunteer to design the t-shirt! But I'm picking the colors!
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  #9  
Old 09-21-2003, 05:27 PM
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hi dude;
words are slippery fish. If you are uncomfortable with the term sculptor it is perhaps the meaning and status (or lack of it) the culture ascribes to the title.
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  #10  
Old 09-24-2003, 11:01 AM
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JHoughton JHoughton is offline
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I am also one of those people that have a hard time lumping myself into any singular catagory, I feel in many ways it reflects what our society does to all humanity. In this case our work or (product for some) places us in our little box. The problem is that the technology in this rehlm has advanced so much that some of us are no longer interested in spitting out David Smith and Giacometti like park poop copies and want to deal with contemporary issues with any and all options at our disposal. In my personal works I will use any and all methods and materials it takes to get my idea across. This is reflected more and more in the education world where interaction between the fields of study is being pushed for more and more.

Just my $.02
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  #11  
Old 09-24-2003, 02:24 PM
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I have no problem calling myself a sculptor. I prefer it to the nebulous term "artist" by far. I don't find it limiting, but perhaps that is because I tend to limit myself almost exclusively to steel and wood anyway.

Materials and process are very important but they do not *determine the visions capable of being expressed. Many cultures and times have used the same material to express drastically different visions. I find it oddly narrow-sighted to declare all work done in a semi-traditional material like steel or bronze to be "park poop copies." Perhaps some are, but so are many multi-media resisting-all labels-terminally-hip-type work. Try not to concern yourself with how others judge you and focus on the quality of work you are making, regardless of how many or how few media are employed.

Being a Sculptor carries with it a strong tradition and responsibility that I am proud to identify myself with.

Sam
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Last edited by sculptorsam : 09-24-2003 at 02:26 PM.
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  #12  
Old 09-24-2003, 03:44 PM
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Carver

What I do has dimensions, sometimes two, most often three. Sometimes I install those dimensions in a place where I can sit and watch reactions. Does that make me a d(i)emented installation artist? And if in the open air, a land-what-ever-they-are-called-thingy? If you need a box, I hope it is to stand on to look over the horizon. Bye-the-bye if any of you are in Houston I will lecture on creativity the 4th of Oct. 9:45a.m. at 2711 Main St.

Ardore

Art is provocation.
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  #13  
Old 09-24-2003, 04:30 PM
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Araich Araich is offline
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Hey Jarrod could we see some of your work?
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  #14  
Old 09-24-2003, 09:05 PM
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Value of art?

Interesting comments here. I sort of go with sculptorsam. Putting out good work, whatever the material, subject or treatment, is what matters. Or to paraphrase Shakespeare: “The form’s the thing!”

On a different note: One of the things Rodin wanted to do about 1870 - 1880 was use the power of the Industrial Revolution to bring art to the people - to use the massively lower costs of industrialization to produce excellent work in multiple copies at affordable prices. I suspect he ran aground on the simple fact that most people would rather watch a football game on the tube than buy art.

Another bit of history - What about the Bauhaus movement in circa 1920 Europe? I’m woefully ignorant of most art history, but the concept here, I believe, also was to make life more liveable by creating better architecture, again using industrial technology in service to good design. (Anne, as an architect, you may have some insight into this.) It was this movement that gave us skyscrapers and clean, lean towers. They have been superceded by a return to more organic shapes, but the product was as revolutionary as Picasso.
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  #15  
Old 09-24-2003, 11:26 PM
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When to let go

How much formal works and issues can a person do before they decide enough!? Is there enough? How do pull yourself up and out of the rut? When does the intelect start? Just curious.
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  #16  
Old 09-24-2003, 11:44 PM
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I guess I don't exactly understand your question. Are you suggesting more "traditional" materials can only be used to explore formal issues? That there is no intellect involved? That they as media are singular in their limitations while the "new" carries with it no constraints?

I'd say the sculptor is only as limited as they choose to be, the choice of material is secondary. A change or proliferation of media may be necessary to express your voice, but the impetus must come first. Merely changing the font you write in won't make the wording any more beautiful/meaningful. Changes undertaken superficially will result in superficial work. Just as the fear of change and reflexive clinging to a single, trusted material could lead to numbing repetition.

Sam
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  #17  
Old 09-25-2003, 09:14 AM
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Very Bigger Questions

Gents
Les condamnés a mort auraient la tête coupe. The condemned to death will have their heads cut off. A phrase repeated several times over a period of about 5 minuets by a French actor in a 30es film is the best example of “changing the font” or of form defining function I know. An essentially sad and morbid phrase becomes in the mouth of Fernandel a classic piece of slapstick by only “changing the font” and the repition of the “known material” does not lead to “numbing”. Change for change’s sake is as useless as fear of change.

And you Mr. Houghton have answered your own questions by “Just (stay) curious”. Also in the thread Figurative Sculpture you’ve written, “necessary to utilize the human form to inform a larger issue.” That, Sir is the most profound statement about the creative conundrum I know.

Ardore or Order

Art is provocation
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  #18  
Old 09-25-2003, 10:38 AM
jwebb jwebb is offline
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Just don't call me Late For Dinner.
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  #19  
Old 09-25-2003, 08:16 PM
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Dinner?

When I set the table and have cooked, no one has to be called.

Ardore or Order

Art is provcation
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