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  #1  
Old 10-30-2005, 11:58 AM
Peter Cowman Peter Cowman is offline
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What role....

Hi everyone, Iam new here so I dont know if this is the right place for this topic but I was jsut wondering if any of you had any thoughts on what role stone carving or sculpting has in teh 21st century? The reason I ask is because Iam doing a school project, and I do have my thoughts Im not trying to steal yours, I just want some views. I have already had a wonderful interview with a wonderful artist and I thank her very much, she knows who she is. Thank for your time and your opinion is greatly valued.
Peter
Sorry if this is in the wrong category, dont be angry
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  #2  
Old 10-30-2005, 06:06 PM
GaryR52 GaryR52 is offline
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Re: What role....

As far as I'm concerned, it has the same role it had in the preceding century. But then, I'm not one of these people who thinks everything has to be continually new and that anything six months old is ancient.

Gary

Last edited by GaryR52 : 10-31-2005 at 09:16 AM.
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  #3  
Old 10-30-2005, 07:57 PM
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JAZ JAZ is offline
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Re: What role....

Peter,
I've never done stone work and probably never will, but I have observed that it is the best material for outdoor sculpture in regard to maintenence and longevity, therefore will always be valuable. All other materials for outdoor installation have maintenance issues, whereas stone ages well with no interference. It is in itself a beautiful material. That said, it is up to the stone sculptor to use this eternal material it in a way that befits the time period.
JAZ
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  #4  
Old 10-30-2005, 11:20 PM
F.C. White F.C. White is offline
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Re: What role....

Stone is a medium... not a fad. Just my .02 cents.
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  #5  
Old 11-12-2005, 01:03 PM
AKoch AKoch is offline
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Re: What role....

undefined
The thing about a media is whether it suits the artist, that can you express yourself in that material. In that sense, nothing is irrelavant, what counts is expressing yourself. unfortunately, this seems to be a big problem in the plastic arts, no classic guitarist throws away his instrument because electric ones are available.
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  #6  
Old 11-13-2005, 07:34 AM
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Re: What role....

Is the question you're really asking:
"Will stone still be viable in 21st century scultpure?"
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  #7  
Old 11-13-2005, 12:39 PM
GaryR52 GaryR52 is offline
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Re: What role....

If so, then my 2 cents would be, sure; why wouldn't it be? Just because it's now the 21st century doesn't imply that everything used during subsequent centuries is now somehow "obsolete." If anything, the use of stone in sculpture seems to be increasing, as a new generation tries it out. Styles and genres of art will come and go, but time tested media like stone and bronze seem to be immortal, and why not? They are the longest lasting materials used for sculpture during the past three thousand years. You don't throw that out just because the calendar says it's 2005. The fact is, much of what has been identified with the 19th century carried over into the 20th and we can expect that much from the 20th will, in turn, carry over into the 21st and, not only is there nothing wrong with that, it's simply the way life goes.

Science fiction and futurists have a way of "over-predicting" the future. I recall, vividly, the visions of The Year 2000 that were predicted during the 1960s, even before we had landed a man on the moon. Arthur C. Clarke envisioned a moon base by the year 2000, as well as regular interplanetary space travel for civilians and heuristicly programmed computers. The reality, of course, is that none of these things yet exists and we have fallen far short of the world predicted. But, this is what usually happens with such long range forecasts; we overextrapolate from existing conditions, without considering the fact that, the more things change, the more they remain the same.

So it goes with art and art media. While some may believe the future of art lies in something that will evolve out of digital technology, and even though there is evidence of this, the fact is that, for every advance in technology, there is a corresponding move backward; a rediscovery of the tried and true, a new reverence for the old ways of doing things, and a new-found concern for their preservation. This happens in every generation, in every field across the board. You can call it simple nostalgia, if you like, but there is more to it than a simplistic desire to cling to the past. There are good reasons for not throwing away our culture and abandoning it for something completely new. If you look at the findings of archaeology, you'll see that, in every culture throughout human history, advances (especially in the arts) came about very slowly, over a period of centuries. In our time, in which the rate of change has accelerated, there is an illusion created that suggests that everything will continue to change, and that everything will continue to change rapidly. The historical record says otherwise, though. Whole cultures don't change overnight, nor do they change without reason.

Gary
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  #8  
Old 11-24-2005, 09:41 AM
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underachiever underachiever is offline
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Re: What role....

That said, new materials and techniques, or revivals of especially old ones tend to motivate any kind of movement in sculpture. The whole modern fixation on things that are done quickly and perfectly would only mean that materials and methods such as casting would gain prominence with the youth.

Who really wants to carve stone anyway? It's hard work, it's dirty, no one wants to buy any cause it's heavy, and by the time you are done, you are covered with bruises and little cuts.

You got to be insane to carve stone.

... And I started on granite too.
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  #9  
Old 11-24-2005, 11:56 AM
GaryR52 GaryR52 is offline
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Re: What role....

Well, if that's the way you're looking at it, why even become a sculptor at all? If quick, easy to use materials are the only things you have the patience and stamina for, and if stone is such hard work to carve (debatable. Have you tried soap stone or alabaster?), then you might consider becoming a painter, instead, or at least pursuing the more "up-to-date" variety of "sculpture" being produced by the conceptualists. Heck, Jeff Koons hardly broke a sweat, let alone a fingernail, when he made his series of vacuum cleaners. No need to worry about cuts and bruises if you're just stacking ready made objects on a gallery floor, either. Look, sculpture is a lot more labor intensive than painting and yes, some of its media and processes can even be dangerous to work with, but that hasn't daunted those who are serious about sculpture. If you're looking for a hobby that is easy to do, may I suggest stamp collecting?

Gary
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  #10  
Old 11-24-2005, 06:54 PM
Jamo Jamo is offline
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Re: What role....

Why would you want to climb mount everest that thing is stall and cold.
Sculpture isn't supposed to be easy and you can't jump into making perfect sculptures right from day 1. I wouldn't say stone sculptors are insane I would say they are resilient. Maybe this might explain why someone would like to sculpt stone. http://www.famousquotes.me.uk/speech..._Kennedy/3.htm
Sorry my hat goes off to anyone who is willing to try and sculpt stone.
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  #11  
Old 11-24-2005, 07:32 PM
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underachiever underachiever is offline
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Re: What role....

Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryR52
Well, if that's the way you're looking at it, why even become a sculptor at all? If quick, easy to use materials are the only things you have the patience and stamina for, and if stone is such hard work to carve (debatable. Have you tried soap stone or alabaster?), then you might consider becoming a painter, instead, or at least pursuing the more "up-to-date" variety of "sculpture" being produced by the conceptualists. Heck, Jeff Koons hardly broke a sweat, let alone a fingernail, when he made his series of vacuum cleaners. No need to worry about cuts and bruises if you're just stacking ready made objects on a gallery floor, either. Look, sculpture is a lot more labor intensive than painting and yes, some of its media and processes can even be dangerous to work with, but that hasn't daunted those who are serious about sculpture. If you're looking for a hobby that is easy to do, may I suggest stamp collecting?

Gary
I think you missed the point. I was just repeating what my lecturers and people around me told me when I mentioned I wanted to carve stone. The fact I decided to learn how to carve stone by starting on granite should have made it obvious to you that I was never interested in something easy to do. To make it a little easier to understand, Granite's grade 8 to 9, most times, Marble grade 5 It's considered one of the hardest stones around. My lecturer tried to convince me not to carve stone, and when he realised that tried to make me carve sandstone. Of course, I don't like the easy way out. :/

That said, most young artists around me seem to do like that kind of "up to date" sculpture. I had one guy in my class exhibiting his shit, and trying to seem all happy about it.
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  #12  
Old 11-25-2005, 01:35 AM
GaryR52 GaryR52 is offline
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Re: What role....

Quote:
Originally Posted by underachiever
I think you missed the point. I was just repeating what my lecturers and people around me told me when I mentioned I wanted to carve stone.
Oh, well, you didn't mention this in your post, so how was anyone to know?

Quote:
Originally Posted by underachiever
The fact I decided to learn how to carve stone by starting on granite should have made it obvious to you that I was never interested in something easy to do.
Again, you didn't say anything about that in your post, either. We're not mind readers, you know. Like they say in the screenwriting biz, if it isn't on the page, it isn't on the screen.

Quote:
Originally Posted by underachiever
My lecturer tried to convince me not to carve stone, and when he realised that tried to make me carve sandstone. Of course, I don't like the easy way out. :/
Good for you, then. Glad you didn't cave in to him.

Quote:
Originally Posted by underachiever
That said, most young artists around me seem to do like that kind of "up to date" sculpture. I had one guy in my class exhibiting his shit, and trying to seem all happy about it.
LOL. Yeah, there's a lot of that going around these days.


Gary
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  #13  
Old 11-25-2005, 02:56 AM
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underachiever underachiever is offline
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Re: What role....

Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryR52
Oh, well, you didn't mention this in your post, so how was anyone to know?
Well, I thought it was obvious, but as you said it's not that obvious. My bad.
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  #14  
Old 11-25-2005, 06:30 AM
GaryR52 GaryR52 is offline
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Re: What role....

No problem. At least you eventually got the point across.

Gary
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  #15  
Old 11-25-2005, 06:32 AM
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Merlion Merlion is offline
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Re: What role....

Underachiever, I think the art college you are attending is not representative. It seems to have problems with it's full-time sculpture course, which is a pity.

My comment to you is that if you have a dream, and is clear about it, go ahead and pursue it. But be prepared to face possible difficulties and obstacles.

Let's say your dream is to be a good stone carving sculptor. Many good and motivated sculptors are self taught, learning from books, by asking around, by trial and error, by making friends (be humble, no point in making enemies), by visiting art museums and galleries and viewing public art.

Actually it is suitable to start learning from carving the easy materials, say sandstone and even plaster. Granite is so hard that the usual tools may not be good enough.
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  #16  
Old 11-25-2005, 11:44 AM
G. Murdoch G. Murdoch is offline
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Re: What role....

Greetings,

Have just been following this thread and thought I'd throw in my two cents. Having carved 4 sculptures from sandstone in the 1-3 tonne range and 1 sculpture from a 24 tonne boulder of the same sandstone, I am left wondering if those who recomend sandstone as a soft stone or as a stone which is easy to carve, have ever actually done so? Soapstone and alabaster are good places to start.

Graham
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  #17  
Old 11-28-2005, 07:46 PM
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Re: What role....

Quote:
Originally Posted by G. Murdoch
Greetings,

Have just been following this thread and thought I'd throw in my two cents. Having carved 4 sculptures from sandstone in the 1-3 tonne range and 1 sculpture from a 24 tonne boulder of the same sandstone, I am left wondering if those who recomend sandstone as a soft stone or as a stone which is easy to carve, have ever actually done so? Soapstone and alabaster are good places to start.

Graham
He said it was soft when compared to granite.
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  #18  
Old 11-29-2005, 08:51 PM
G. Murdoch G. Murdoch is offline
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Re: What role....

Underachiever,

Greetings, my bad, apologies extended. I must confess to being a mite sensitve on this topic because so often when I tell people I am carving sandstone, I hear "Oh, well that's really soft, isn't it." Makes me crazy sometimes that people with zero practical experience are so quick to dismiss what has required monumental effort from me. I must remember to leave this occassionally thin skinned attitude outside this site!

Graham
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  #19  
Old 11-29-2005, 10:06 PM
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Re: What role....

Well, if the material doesn't impress them, the scale should. :P
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