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  #1  
Old 05-25-2003, 04:52 PM
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fritchie fritchie is offline
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Conceptualization of new work

I think the problem most contemporary figurative sculptors(and conceptual artists, as well) encounter is the inability to extend their efforts beyond being merely literal illustrations of some idea or theme. - New Member jfmenna

I hope you don’t mind my using your post for a new thread. Several people have alluded to the thinking processes involved in creation of their work. This new thread can let them share those ideas and methods, if specific methods help them, with others. How about it?
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Old 05-29-2003, 04:19 AM
anne (bxl) anne (bxl) is offline
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Blaise Pascal (a french philosopher/physician in the 17° century) said something like this :" everything has already been created by God, but we can assembly or use existing elements in a new way, so that we have the filling of creating something new"

I guess my personnal process of conceptualization is coming from my conscious or unconscious memory (social, cultural, personnal memory), encounting my sensibility to the today world.
I try to enrich my knowledge of the human beiing by visiting new places, travelling, exchange with people living far from my standards, having new emotionnal experiences, reading books and magazines.....

staying up for hours in the night or swimming alone for hours (luckily, I swim daily....) are the most efficient moment where to analyse and do synthesis (keyword!) of those emotions in order to produce new mental images.
starting point of an art work.
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Old 05-29-2003, 08:09 PM
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Hi Fritchie,
Thanks for yours. You are all so nice I must have been running with a bad crowd in the past for I am so stressed out with people behaviour, this is a really nice place to hide.
Dreaming up my next creation? I seem drawn to memorial sculptures. I guess I must have a lot of sadness in my soul for I identify with everyones sorrow and want to tell them by means of my sculptures, that I know how they feel so depending on the memorial, I draw on my own emotions and how the particular project makes me feel. If I see people crying, I cry too. It is quite involuntary. So then I try to capture my/their feelings with gesture (that word I can't let go of) but it is working very well for me.
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Old 05-30-2003, 10:20 AM
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Good Morning fellow Sculptors. I am so excited today I can hardly stand myself. For the past 7 months (winter/spring) when my figurative sculptural energies are usually at their highest and most creative, I have been side tracked with our house remodel and landscaping projects. All sculptural in their own right but my energy was sapped.
I am finally on the last stages of the landscaping and can send all these helpers away. Peace at last. I have been really concerned that I did not feel creative in the usual department and wondered if my sap had dried up forever but today I feel rejuvenated and rearing to go.
I have the first stages of my 9/11 memorial design completed. It just happened in the stroke of my pen. I had been laboring in the evenings over the first gesture I had captured. It wasnt "saying" enough but I didnt want to let go because I liked the little it was saying. I decided to add a second gesture and voila! My piece came to life.
Now I can set about building it in clay in preparation for photographing and submitting.
What is everyone else working on?
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Old 05-30-2003, 08:35 PM
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Real life interuptions

Victoria, Congratulations! We all have to deal with real life, but it can be frustrating to put our "real work" on hold.
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Old 06-01-2003, 03:43 PM
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Conceptual Art, Are we all on the same page? The Thames and Hudson Dictionary of Art Terms says; "Art of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s which is created according to one or more of the following principles:
1. That art consists in the basic idea, which does not have to be embodied in a physical form.
2. That language becomes the basic material of art, and the barrier between art and art theory is breached.
3. That artistic activity becomes an enquiry into the nature of art itself, and any result or embodiment must be regarded simply as an interim demonstration of the general conclusion reached by the artist. Among the artists associated with Conceptual Art are Lawrence Weiner, Sol LeWitt, Joseph Kosuth and Bruce Nauman, though some of these are also categorized as MINIMALISTS.

So I thought some of you would appreciate seeing this as I was under the misunderstanding that a conceptual artist was one with a visualized idea who then may have to employ an artisan or computer to put the concept into tangible/visible form. What do I know?!
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Old 06-01-2003, 09:24 PM
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Conceptual art and Conceptualization of new art

Hi, Victoria - All things change with time, including the meaning of words and phrases (fortunately or unfortunately, according to one's viewpoint). I titled this thread Conceptualization of new art, not to say your post is out of place, because we are discussing Conceptual art as well. I wanted to get at just how sculptors go about generating ideas.

As far as Conceptual art itself, I think the term has evolved. It still may mean art that does not have physical form, or art that tries to expand the definition of art, or questions the “nature of art”, but I think displacement of art theory is less significant. Nevertheless, the definition includes any or all of these things, so it still fits.
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Old 06-02-2003, 03:11 AM
slintfan slintfan is offline
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idea generation

For myself, idea generation comes most fluidly after a solid consumption of information. For example, leaving one really great cd in the player for a week. Another tactic I use is constantly being aware, and seeing, how people and stuff interact around me--I mean, being really honed in on environment. Books. Scrap-yards. Birds.

You really must know how you function as an art maker. Where are the places you have to put yourself to be "on". I suck in info from all around me, put it in my blender, cook it for a month, and spit out something that is totally awkward, but works for me as a sum and new problem of the info I put in to begin with.

Bradford
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Old 06-02-2003, 08:23 PM
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Open to the world

Slintfan - Thanks for this perspective. Sounds like you make yourself hyperaware and hyperopen to the world. That’s got to generate some really original work. Do you tune work after the first state, or just go with what first came out? And if you go with the first crack, do you follow on with similar ideas, or go back to the hyperopen state?

Last edited by fritchie : 06-02-2003 at 08:29 PM.
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  #10  
Old 06-02-2003, 11:40 PM
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My current obsession is with old toys. I love looking at the usually simple shapes that have such power to evoke coded meanings. The workings fascinate me and I try and visualize them in different configurations and with different scale references.

The world forces a seriousness on artists, but the real work of creating for many of us is more like a game or playfulness of spirit.
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Old 06-03-2003, 03:03 PM
slintfan slintfan is offline
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fritchie

In response to what I do with an idea after its conception. I try to be loose with the materalization phase of my art making--letting decisions that are specific to the way I think come through in the material and presentation. In a way it is like my "hand", but not necessarily in the physical manipulation, but just basic decisions and personal restrictions. Much of our artistic identity is based on a set of restrictions that we put on our art making itself. "I am a metal worker, or clay artist," we say. "I don't work in wood," etc. My set of restrictions are specific to myself and therefore are part of my "hand". I try to let this set stay fluid though. It seems important right now to not let myself become sedimentary. Conception from a state of awareness--materalization of physical elements loosely--presentation of conglomerate as a whole, while realizing that it is just that, presentation, that is the communicative factor or entry point for my audience. basically. thanks fritch

stay fluid!
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Old 06-03-2003, 08:07 PM
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Fun and computers

Russ - Take a look at the post I just put in the Sculpture and Computers section, if you want simple images which carry a lot of weight. A human figure in 3D space defined with only 6, or about 27, simple points, complete with gender and good articulation. I realize this is not where you are, but it shows the power of imagination, and a simple framework on which computers can build.
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Old 06-03-2003, 08:20 PM
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Fluid

Slintfan - Good approach. As you can see, I do only the human figure, and only in a fairly realistic mode; now even only in bronze. I probably decided 40+ years ago, that if I ever did sculpture, it would be like this. That was on seeing, first hand, works by the masters from Greek, Renaissance, and early 20th century times.

Of course, back then I was interested only in science, my chosen field of graduate study. These works were simply so impressive that I took them as the apex of sculpture. The field has widened considerably in the last 100+ years, but I still regard the figure as the most powerful form. That probably comes through in my posts. Best with your own approach.
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Old 06-04-2003, 01:59 PM
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Hi Fritchie, You wrote;
All things change with time, including the meaning of words and phrases (fortunately or unfortunately, according to one's viewpoint).
LOL That's whats wrong with the world, nobody is on the same page anymore.
I titled this thread Conceptualization of new art, not to say your post is out of place, because we are discussing Conceptual art as well. I wanted to get at just how sculptors go about generating ideas.

I believe you have used the term perfectly correctly and I understood your "concept" for this thread. I think CloudDreamer used the term in a different sense, figuratively, so I just wanted to be clear. I thought when I immigrated to the USA in 1977 that I wouldnt have any trouble with language as I am english speaking. WRONG!! lol

Back to the revolving table. I just came up for a bit of air.
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Old 06-04-2003, 02:23 PM
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Once, I was a prolific sculpture.

I had undergone a very traumatic and deadly time over the recent years and I became unable to create. I would come up with ideas, make efforts, change directions, find more meaning, more passion, and immerse myself in art and life to break the block that stopped me in my tracks. I laboured and pushed myself and tried and tried again, only to get the same drivel over and over again.

For a year and a half, nothing......

and then, I just sat down and absently played with my medium. The texture, the feel, the smell, the warmth, and I realized that I had returned to the roots of being an artist. Touch and pleasure. For the first time in years, I rediscovered that peaceful place to open my mind.

Just needed to share that epiphany.
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Old 06-04-2003, 03:54 PM
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Hi Aurora,
Your post brought to mind a three year period when I spent studying the human figure at the Chicago Art Institute. One of my fellow students was a Professor of Psychology. Our teacher was absolutely horrible and we later discovered a really lousy "artist." One day I was reduced to tears and sat on the edge of my life-sized armature platform with my head in my hands. Our teacher had swept dramatically from the room for lunch break. My psychology buddy offered to buy me a cup of coffee to help cheer me. I guess it worked. I can't remember.
Like you, I felt as though I had laboured forever over trashy output but that last piece that my teacher sliced to pieces with his demo knife, was wonderful. I was totally in love with my own work because it seemed to embody the sadness within and without words said exactly what I felt and saw in that class. Unless working on a commission, I I believe we release all our self doubt, misery and questioning. Each piece we create is a small extension of ourselves. Eventually perhaps it will all be "out there" and we will never pick up another chisel. Anyhow I knew I was ready to exit the Art Institute that semester. It was sort of a rounding off and time to go.
I had a weird dream that night. I dreamed We were all lunatics in an asylum and that I had finally become well enough to be released and left. LOL. The next day at class my psychology friend came over to me and said "are you OK? I had the weirdest dream last night. We were all in hospital beds in a large room together except your bed was empty and made up. You werent there any longer and I felt very sad that you were gone."
Weird mental telepathic connection wouldnt you say.
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Old 06-04-2003, 09:27 PM
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que sera...

Aurora - You said ......... I just sat down and absently played with my medium. The texture, the feel, the smell, the warmth, and I realized that I had returned to the roots of being an artist..... I suspect that’s a way many of us work, just getting to the right place and “que sera, sera; “what will be, will be”.

And Victoria, I ‘m not sure you have said just how you generate ideas, but I imagine it’s a bit like this - sitting down and “letting things happen”. Is that close?
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Old 06-30-2003, 04:15 PM
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Hi all,
Miss me? The 9/11 memorial sculpture competition closes today. I hope to God Fed-Ex got my submission in on time. It should have arrived last Thursday!! So I am more relaxed now and
I wonder if I may start a new thread MUSIC? I would be most interested to know what types of music you all listen to when you are creating and what specific tunes, composers, etc., turn you on for what specific sculpture?
I adore Leonard Cohens music. He is so evil sounding. Has incredible lazy steady rhythem and those words he uses in that husky throaty voice are very enjoyable.
For classical music I like to go for really exciting stuff like piano competitions one that comes to mind "Gorncheck Festival" I know I've got the spelling wrong but I can't find the CD to correct that. I also love Cafe Noir music and Pink Floyd's "The Wall"
Blues singers are great, some of them and I am crazy about "World Music" especially community singers like the Italians love to put out. I love the sound of lots of happy souls singing heartily together.
Was wondering what any of you could suggest that was really funky or whatever? So what do I have to do to take this thread to new heights?
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