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  #1  
Old 01-03-2006, 07:02 AM
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oddist oddist is offline
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Question age and influence

Question for you all...

Do you believe your age influences the choice of figurative subject matter or non-objective imagery you sculpt?????

Have you found as you age that your choices have changed????
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"Important artists are innovators whose work changes the practices of their successors; important works of art are those that embody these innovations."
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  #2  
Old 01-03-2006, 10:08 AM
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ExNihiloStudio ExNihiloStudio is offline
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Re: age and influence

I personally think that art making and viewing is a cognitive enterprise, so if experience helps expand understanding then sure, that might influence choices. Of course itís entirely possible to grow older and learn nothing.
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  #3  
Old 01-03-2006, 10:25 AM
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bluedogshuz bluedogshuz is offline
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Smile Re: age and influence

I am living proof Mark!!!
Actually I was seduced by figurative art animals and people, it is exciting to reproduce what one sees in life. As I have aged I found myself discouraged at times and feeling like people don't care what I display (which may be true). However, my therapy is pick up a pen a small pad and start expressing how I feel with form. I like to combine natural curving forms and give them a human dignity. I may do some realistic study but only to sharpen my abstracts. If I get really lazy I start carving stone and that clearifies to me how easy the constructions are. I think that is a process of aging and dare I say maturing?
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  #4  
Old 01-03-2006, 02:31 PM
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Re: age and influence

Definitely. Oddly enough, Oddist, in my youth I almost exclusively drew and sculpted in a figurative and more realistic fashion. Now, I am drawn further and further into minimalism as an interprative style. Sleak and elegant lines and curves. I am still searching for my style as I have only recently devoted myself to becoming an indepent artist. Who know where and what style I'll end up. One thing I'm pretty sure of though is, I will be sticking in three dimensional mediums.
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  #5  
Old 01-18-2006, 03:01 PM
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GWayne GWayne is offline
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Re: age and influence

Great topic! Personally, my unstable living environment and frustration with my artistic style at the time were the two major factors responsible in my becoming a non-objective/minimalist artist.

GWayne


http://www.georgewayne.com

Last edited by GWayne : 01-18-2006 at 04:36 PM.
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  #6  
Old 01-19-2006, 09:20 AM
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Re: age and influence

Oddist,
Maybe another element that affects our work is not age, but time, the length of time that you have been doing whatever you are doing? I've been making things my whole life...in different media and different scales, but inventing and making things from scratch. I always do all of my own work (no farming it out. Maybe when I get really too old to handle it myself?) I've only been working with steel for ten years. Which outweighs the other: would my work seem to be mature because of my age, because I have always made things, or does it look immature because I've only been doing it for ten years?
If what you are asking (as some people have suggested) is whether age affects whether we work abstractly or realistically, in my case it doesn't. I've always done some realism and some abstraction. Today I will be working on rubber molds for several small pieces I'm playing around with. (Even though I seem to be mildly allergic to something I'm using.) One is a natural form, one is totally abstract, two are figures, and I've started three tiny ones all of which are combinations of found objects with original figurative or abstract elements. this is the same kind of blending of things I did at the Museum School and when I was a little kid, though the materials and processes were different and not so complex.
Pigeon-holing is tough with this group, eh?
JAZ
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  #7  
Old 01-19-2006, 12:36 PM
G. Murdoch G. Murdoch is offline
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Re: age and influence

Greetings all. Great thread. Speaking for myself, I started out obsessed with the human figure, and mostly disdained abstract and minimalist art as the product of people without the dedication, courage, and skill neccesary to render things realisticly. After about 7 years I had the great good fortune to live and work in the home/studio of Somers Randolph, a modern american master stone carver. he introduced me to the creative possibilities of abstract forms, rendered with great skill. Complicated compositions. Since then I have produced both abstract forms and human figures. I still retain part of my original bias regarding skill though. When I view artwork I want to see evidence of skill as well as original ideas.

Graham
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  #8  
Old 01-19-2006, 07:16 PM
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Re: age and influence

Quote:
Originally Posted by G. Murdoch
Speaking for myself, I started out obsessed with the human figure, and mostly disdained abstract and minimalist art as the product of people without the dedication, courage, and skill neccesary to render things realisticly. After about 7 years I had the great good fortune to live and work in the home/studio of Somers Randolph, a modern american master stone carver. he introduced me to the creative possibilities of abstract forms, rendered with great skill. Complicated compositions. Since then I have produced both abstract forms and human figures. I still retain part of my original bias regarding skill though. When I view artwork I want to see evidence of skill as well as original ideas.
I agree very much with your sentiments. Starting and establishing a firm foundation with modeling the human figure is the correct way for serious sculptors. This takes time, patience and dedication. It is only after gaining good knowledge and skills with the human figure that one should go also for abstract and other art styles.

I think it rarely works going the other way round. It seems difficult to start and be good with abstract, before starting oneself on the human figure. There may be exceptions and I'd like to hear about them.

One problem I see with young art students. Unless they are forced to, they often take the easy way out and start off with abstract sculptures and try to avoid practicing on the human figure seriously.
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  #9  
Old 03-21-2006, 04:53 PM
arcdawg arcdawg is offline
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Re: age and influence

Quote:
Originally Posted by Merlion

One problem I see with young art students. Unless they are forced to, they often take the easy way out and start off with abstract sculptures and try to avoid practicing on the human figure seriously.

Im a young artist and I do a good amount of abstract work. (not classicly trained) but I feel that its takes just as much if not more creatitivy to make abstract art -

dawg
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  #10  
Old 03-21-2006, 07:37 PM
ironman ironman is offline
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Re: age and influence

Hi, Good Non-objective art is HARDER to do than realistic work, because you're on your own without the safety net of a model to fall back on.
I've heard it said that artists do non-obj work because they don't know how to do figurative work. I think that in most cases nothing could be further from the truth.
In my case, I was trained to do figurative work first, and also plenty of life drawing (a must), my teacher and mentor would not allow any student of his to go right into abstraction without a background in figurative work.
I can almost always tell a poorly trained artist, whether figurative or abstract, because the good ones know how to see and the poor ones have no idea what they don't know, and it shows.
As far as "Age and Influence" goes, I'm more likely to think that who you study with and what you are exposed to is more likely to influence what direction you go in.
I was born in 1946, and I remember that Look magazine or was it Life Magazine article on Jackson Pollack, "Jack the Dripper" in the early to mid fifties, I wasn't even 10 yrs old yet I still remember it, I also knew about DeKooning, and a few others, Conrad Marca-relli comes to mind.
I studied predominately with a man who, although he had a fantastic grounding in realism, did abstract work, and was introduced to David Smith's and Anthony Caro's work through my classes with him. To his credit, he tried (and I think succeeded) to keep from influencing any of his students to follow his style.
I also grew up in NYC which was and maybe still is the art capital of the world, so I was exposed to TONS of great Art, both realistic and abstract.
I do non-objective welded steel sculpture and over the years my work has changed from a real interest in negative space and how it affects the form and feeling to doing work that is more about form, juxtaposing both straight and curved shapes, light and shadow and most of all, FEELING.
Non-objective art was mostly what I saw in the galleries in NYC in the 70's, and it was and I think still is considered the leading edge, so to speak, anyway, today, anything goes, realism, abstraction, or maybe even both in the same work, so I'm really glad that I'm classically trained, that way, I can do either one, if I choose to.
I thank my lucky stars that I grew up in NYC and studied with who I did, I'm not sure if he's a great artist, but he was a GREAT TEACHER and I am indebted to him for what he taught me and the seriousness that he showed towards this thing we call sculpture.
Have a great day,
Jeff
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  #11  
Old 03-22-2006, 08:37 AM
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oddist oddist is offline
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Re: age and influence

Jeff,

I think you are one of the lucky ones to have had the exposure you did...

Anyway, back to "Age and Influence"--I came across a book that kind of talks about it....

See http://www.artsjournal.com/postclass...logy_reth.html for a little review...
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"Important artists are innovators whose work changes the practices of their successors; important works of art are those that embody these innovations."
Galenson, David W. Old Masters and young geniuses, Princeton University Press, 2006
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  #12  
Old 01-20-2006, 09:12 PM
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GWayne GWayne is offline
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Re: age and influence

Merlion,

Hi! Juan Gris is an exception to the rule. He didn't study the human figure in great depth, but he did become one of the most important contributors of the Cubist movement. For the most part, he learned by observing Braque and Picasso while they worked in their studios. His style was very mature and it pushed the boundaries of Cubism.

GWayne

Last edited by GWayne : 02-01-2006 at 08:31 PM.
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  #13  
Old 03-21-2006, 01:29 PM
Chris W Chris W is offline
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Re: age and influence

I have found that even though my work is realistic I study my subjects in an abstract way. Seeing the volumes and negative spaces helps to lay out the form as a whole. I've been building animals in steel and bronze for ten years. Most of them are realistic. www.chriwilliamssculpture.com
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