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  #1  
Old 04-25-2007, 10:00 AM
Biomorph Biomorph is offline
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Met Museum Greek and Roman Galleries

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has just opened its newly reconstituted Greek and Roman Galleries. I am a museum buff, particularly at the Met, but this is something else.
The galleries are magnificent, and the amount of incredible stuff they have brought forth from the archive is astounding--makes you irritated that it was all kept hidden for so long.
It makes you realize, again, that [i] ancient art is three dimensional-sculptural-[granted,there are some eerily modern and wonderful wall paintings from Pompeii], and [ii] that there is a reason why artists look back to the classics. They make you wonder, if you are a figurative artist, whether the best was done two millenia ago. If you are into abstraction, you see the roots of it and wonder what would have been the result if these artists had been given a cultural nudge away from representation.
See it if you possibly can, but give just these galleries at least a full day.
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Old 04-25-2007, 10:23 AM
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GlennT GlennT is offline
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Re: Met Museum Greek and Roman Galleries

Great post Biomorph. Ever since discovering the accessibility of ancient Greek and Roman coins about 3 years ago, I have enthusiastically re-examined those periods in art and come to much the same conclusion. Instead of taking those works for granted and moving on, I have found much to learn from there. Also, there is some mind-blowingly amazing abstract art that was accomplished by the Celtic tribes in England and Gaul during the 2nd-1st century BC, preserved on their coinage. They make Picasso look like a doodler.
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Old 04-25-2007, 11:07 AM
ironman ironman is offline
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Re: Met Museum Greek and Roman Galleries

Hi, There is no artist who makes Picasso look like a doodler! He was one of the greats and if you were at all familiar with his entire body of work, the different genre and the innovations that he brought to the art world, you would know this.
As a former New Yorker (still a New Yorker at heart) I always go to the MET when I'm in town. Now, after your glowing report, I can't wait to see it.
Have a great day,
Jeff
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Old 04-25-2007, 01:11 PM
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evaldart evaldart is offline
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Re: Met Museum Greek and Roman Galleries

Teacher, Teacher! Glenns trying to start trouble again.

While those old patterns tedious-ed away by tribes are sometomes attractive and well-handed but they have nothing to do with abstraction. It was their version of graphic design.
True abstraction in the visual arts is a modern phenomenon sometimes rooted in art history and sometimes not. You do not have to be an abstract artist to understand it - in much the same way that many abstract artist have a profound connection to the realistic and figurative (like myself).
To grasp the fundamentals of abstraction on some level is a must for the forward thinking fine artist. A constantly challeged perception yields origionality.
I have improved my abilites at working figuratively by not working figuratively. I know that when I re-approach figuration, sometimes after years, that I will be better at it by all that occured in between. Making art is not like being a yo-yo champion or a surgeon. You do not need to finesse your fingerskills daily to remember them. Maybe it would be more interesting if the clay were punched into submission once in a while.
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Old 04-25-2007, 03:08 PM
Bertel Bertel is offline
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Re: Met Museum Greek and Roman Galleries

Quote:
Originally Posted by evaldart
Making art is not like being a yo-yo champion or a surgeon. You do not need to finesse your fingerskills daily to remember them.
Actually, making art IS like being a yo-yo champion or a surgeon. You do need to finesse your fingerskills daily to improve them
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Old 04-25-2007, 04:56 PM
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GlennT GlennT is offline
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Re: Met Museum Greek and Roman Galleries

Quote:
Originally Posted by evaldart
Teacher, Teacher! Glenns trying to start trouble again.

It must come easily...it happens even when I think that I'm just trying to be helpful!

While those old patterns tedious-ed away by tribes are sometomes attractive and well-handed but they have nothing to do with abstraction. It was their version of graphic design.

I have no idea what you are talking about. Do you have some handle on a universally understood definition of abstraction that I ( and others ) are missing?


True abstraction in the visual arts is a modern phenomenon sometimes rooted in art history and sometimes not.

If we are talking about abstraction as a visual phenomena whereby things are depicted that do not correspond with concrete reality, then I think the example of some celtic coinage holds as proof that it is an older phenomena. The modern version of abstract art is just of a different type.

You do not have to be an abstract artist to understand it - in much the same way that many abstract artist have a profound connection to the realistic and figurative (like myself).
To grasp the fundamentals of abstraction on some level is a must for the forward thinking fine artist. A constantly challeged perception yields origionality.

Including original spelling One of the main methods of learning to see as a figurative artist involves seeing form in terms of abstract shapes.

I have improved my abilites at working figuratively by not working figuratively. I know that when I re-approach figuration, sometimes after years, that I will be better at it by all that occured in between. Making art is not like being a yo-yo champion or a surgeon. You do not need to finesse your fingerskills daily to remember them. Maybe it would be more interesting if the clay were punched into submission once in a while.
Interesting how on a thread praising the Greek and Roman art exhibit we got sidetracked ( inadvertently by my comment in passing ) into a discussion about abstraction. Someone should start a thread about the beaux-arts so we can bicker about beer and brats!

Meanwhile, hats off to the Greeks who forever changed the world of art and created a standard of excellence that still stands as a good measuring rod. What is called classical today was innovative discovery back then, full of enthusiasm, joy, and wonder of the natural world.

GlennT
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Old 04-25-2007, 07:13 PM
ironman ironman is offline
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Re: Met Museum Greek and Roman Galleries

BRAVO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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  #8  
Old 04-25-2007, 07:57 PM
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Merlion Merlion is offline
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Re: Met Museum Greek and Roman Galleries

If you like you can jump over to a slightly earlier thread about these new Galleries at the Met. There are links there to pictures and videos about the Galleries. The thread is here:

Met Opens New Greek, Roman Galleries
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