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  #1  
Old 07-11-2011, 01:40 AM
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KelEG KelEG is offline
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Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

This topic came up on a computer graphics forum and I was curious to get some views here on it. The consensus was that someone who wants to learn to be a modeller(as in computer based) should learn 2d art techniques. Learning 3d-as in traditional sculpting is seen as less important--in fact someone-an art teacher, said that he had many students who were exceptional realistic 3d sculptors but could not draw well at all. On the other hand, those that were good at drawing immediately took to traditional sculpting.

I was ok at illustrating but never had formal training--several years of sculpting did cause my drawing to improve dramatically.
I certainly wouldnt argue that sculpting is easier to learn than drawing--one may have to deal with perspective and illusions in 2d-but making a portrait sculpture is like 100s of drawings from every angle-and one's handling of tools is very different from using a pencil IMO. Not to mention dealing with scale, or precision(one can get away with things in a realistic drawing that are hard to do in a realistic sculpture).

I think learning 2d is better for learning computer based sculpting simply because there are many shortcuts in CG art and it shares much in common with 2d art, but learning traditional sculpting certainly cant hurt.
Anyway-just wondering what your POV is on the importance of drawing in sculpting, which you consider easier etc.
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Old 07-11-2011, 08:41 AM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

No brainer. You can draw with one hand tied behind your back and be done with it in a couple hours. You wanna try working a 1000#s of stone or metal with one hand? Its gonna take longer than a couple hours. Drawing is also so much easier on the pocket book.
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Old 07-11-2011, 09:22 AM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

A more useful question would be, which is easier to do well?

I see a lot more good drawings than good sculpture out there. With drawing, it is easier to disquise lack of skill with personality and flair. Sculpture is much less forgiving in this respect. You need a good understanding of form and planes and proportion from different angles, multiple views and perspectives, to read well from close up and from distance. You need to understand negative space, and how form reads against a background. With drawing, you have one point of view and any background you choose.

Good draftsmanship is a difficult skill, and when achieved is very delightful. But it is much easier to get away with mediocre drawing skills than with mediocre sculpting skills, and that after much more time is spent working on a sculpture.
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Old 07-11-2011, 09:47 AM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

Sculpting and drawing. They are BOTH simply manualities that must be practiced with vigor if they are ever to follow suitably the demands of the creative will. Realize too that BOTH are physical acts; so there will be interpretation of that will as it manifests itself into reality (as opposed to fantasy, which is where the will only resides). And since it is not relevant to assess a drawn or sculpted artifact by virtue of how well it "represents" anything, how "well" one does will be found in the maximal subjectivity of ONE'S OWN singular thoughts on the matter. Matters of proportion, anatomy, realism and gesture are only the beginning...the basics, the dumb stuff to be eaten up with every OTHER kind of interpretation and visual consideration that one might devour on the way to building a strong aesthetic sensibility.

Sculpting is more demanding though in every way...folks shy away from demands mostly (succumbing to ease and comfort and convenience whenever possible...the flaw of humanity)...so there are far less sculptors than painters, and far less painters than "draw-ers".

BUT, drawing is the FIRST step into improving yourself by the visual arts. Ever indispensable....and you are doing it "well" if you are becoming a better human. And everyone knows that the ONLY way to becoming a better human is through individual immersions in the notions of significant form.

Last edited by evaldart : 07-11-2011 at 08:09 PM.
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  #5  
Old 07-11-2011, 10:42 AM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

What about the value of 2d skills in sculpting. Do you approach a sculpture as if you are marking a surface--creating lines on a surface(I once talked to a classical trained sculptor from Europe and he said sculpting was drawing in space), or like an orange unpeeled.
Do you think of 2d principles much when sculpting or do you see it as something else? When I sculpt I tend to think as much about touching and feeling a shape as I do about how it would look in a 2d sense.
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Old 07-11-2011, 11:27 AM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

Either one can be easier depending on how easy you make it on yourself.
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Old 07-11-2011, 02:45 PM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

I think that whether it is 2D or 3D depends on your medium. Sculptural materials tend to be 3D since even the thinnest piece of steel still has a visible third dimension. While drawing is done on a flat piece of paper and whether the image is to be 2D or 3D is totally dependent on how the artist perceives the subject.
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Old 07-11-2011, 03:56 PM
Andrew Werby Andrew Werby is offline
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

I think it's easier for most people to produce a 3-dimensional object that resembles something they have in mind, than to produce an accurate drawing. The act of drawing requires a process of projection to take place between the picture plane, the eye and the hand that takes some time and practice to master. Making a sculptural representation is more natural.

Also, in clay at least, initial impressions can be corrected and correlated with multiple views, adding and subntracting material fluidly, which will result in a more accurate object after a while. In most drawing media, once you make a line, you're pretty much stuck with it, and more inaccuracy will follow an initial mistake with little opportunity for correction.

But there are certainly exceptions - people with a natural talent for drawing can make the necessary adjustments automatically, without having to think too much about it. This has little to do with great artistry, of course - that depends on other factors besides mere facility, although it certainly doesn't hurt...

Whether or not the ability to draw is more useful for computer modeling is another question, having more to do with the specific program you're talking about than any general considerations of 2d or 3d art. Some programs work from a 2D paradigm, others are more natively three dimensional in their basic workings. But since most modeling programs derive from graphics programs, the 2D approach is more common.

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  #9  
Old 07-11-2011, 04:22 PM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

Ive dabbled in both and for me sculpting is easier. I think it is because with sculpture you are creating 3D from 3D but with drawing you are creating 3D as 2D from 3D which for me is harder. Which I think is what Andrew is saying too.
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Old 07-11-2011, 08:11 PM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

There is plenty of great drawing that is not at all wishing to convince depth or insinuating the illusion of a third - D. It is mark-making, after all...a hand, a tool, some material (and not as flat as you might think).
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  #11  
Old 07-11-2011, 10:19 PM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

Do a google images search for Whistler pastels. When you look at his Venetian landscapes and his pastel figure work, they look so easy and effortless. The economy of line and color that he uses is incredible, and it would take more skill and discipline to naturally attain the ability to do that than most people would realize from looking at the work. It is an exquisite sensibility that has very little to do with the physicality of drawing. So, perhaps easy for him, difficult for the rest of us mortals!
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Old 07-12-2011, 10:48 AM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

I am a very good fine artist and find sculpting more difficult than drawing. You can get away with clever rendering and texturing in drawing but its not so easy with sculpting. I do however believe that drawing skills will add value to a potential sculptor 2d or 3d.
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Old 07-12-2011, 12:02 PM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

Its the mistakes I make in drawings that provide solutions and ideas. It took a long time to appreciate and learn from my inability to draw.
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Old 07-14-2011, 11:51 PM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

A poem this post compelled me to write.
----

What is easier, building a house, or digging a hole in the ground? Making a salad or taking a crap? It depends. Do you have a backhoe? Where is the wood coming from? Easier, harder. What is that? What does that really mean? Is this about laziness? Skill? The question is ambiguous. Which is easier, sculpting, or drawing?

Sculpture is harder, obviously. You only have to sit in one place when drawing. You need to walk around and around when you sculpt. Pace, like a captive tiger. You need scaffolds, mud, scrapers, junk all over the place. You need silicon rubber, welding torches, chemicals, etc.

You can draw at night under the covers using a flashlight as a light. Can you sculpt at night under the covers?

Sculpture is the ultimate art. Everyone is unworthy. God was a sculptor. Talk about ego. When you draw, you are the sun, the world revolves around you. When you sculpt, you are the universe, and insignificant worker bee, attending the work.

Sculpture is the work of people with muscles. People who sculpt have blood blisters and wear dirty jeans to work. They sweat and wear t-shirts. They talk about blow torches and slumping and sand. They eat lunch from a bag with plaster on their hands. They like metal, sand, and fire.

Drawing is like a cucumber salad in the middle of a hot afternoon. Sculpting is catching your favorite cat, skinning him alive and roasting him in the fireplace. Drawing is Pepsi-Cola, sculpture is bouillabaisse. Drawing is in profusion in red ocher, and charcoal at the entrance of the chamber. You have to shimmy down a rope, your life on the line, to find the tiny woman at the end of the series of caves, hidden away because to touch her is death to those who believe.

(the end)
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Old 07-15-2011, 12:15 PM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

Hi KatyL. Is this post the poem? I appreciate the thoughts, but it comes through too forcefully in words to be truly enjoyable. It is trying so hard it puts me off. But it is trying nevertheless, and that's cool.
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Old 07-15-2011, 11:22 PM
KatyL KatyL is offline
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

Not a poetry lover

Last edited by KatyL : 07-15-2011 at 11:56 PM.
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  #17  
Old 07-16-2011, 09:55 PM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

I spent a long time learning how to draw, since I enjoyed the challenge and I was determined to make a living at it.

It took ages before I could convincingly put down on paper the fleeting images my mind threw up - as a storyboard artist you have to keep churning through drawings quickly to keep up with the cinematic flow (especially when drawing shooting boards), and your drawings must be good enough to read quickly without looking awful!

Learning to draw figures from imagination for me meant embedding them in 3d into my brain (after more basic geometrical shapes), and also developing the skill the view them in my mind's eye from various distances, in various compositions, and through various imaginary camera lenses.

There was a lot to learn, and after a couple of decades of doing it for a living I tried sculpture.

Following a methodical approach it came surprisingly easily. I think all the earlier drawing study really prepared my brain for it, along with Lanteri's brilliant books.

I wonder how it would have panned out if my experience had been the other way around, and I'd decided to try drawing after decades of an obsession with sculpting?

All I know is learning to draw well enough to be a fast and efficient storyteller is a lot of hard (but rewarding) work.
Certainly not easy! The side benefit is you can learn to sculpt at the same time, without realizing it!

Having said that, a friend of mine is a jeweler and sculptor and does great things with the minimum of preliminary sketching (just outlines to transfer to his block of wax). I tend to make some drawings to get a feel for certain anatomical features if they aren't clear in pictures and I have access to the real animal, but not much beyond that. I mostly work from photo's of skeletons and critters, and what have you.

So for me, sculpting came easier, but probably only because of my background.
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Old 07-17-2011, 12:29 PM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

katyL the poem seemed heartfelt, like you revel in all of it. if anyone asks you if revel is too strong a word to use, tell them to fuck off or gently say no. Your choice.
I said no way back when, but the fools keep asking.

With any and all of it, use what makes it worth living, as easy or as hard as it is.
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Old 07-17-2011, 12:54 PM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

Yes, fuck all those folks who acknowledge someone and perceive they are willing to participate but they are being ignored by others in the group. How indifferent. How mean.
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Old 07-17-2011, 01:05 PM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

fuck the critics
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Old 07-17-2011, 01:09 PM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

and grasshoppers in my drink, and jars with lids that won't come off and heavy stuff, and grumbly bellies, and lice, and old age, and, and... moldy cheese, except bleu cheese, but all the rest. so there.
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Old 07-17-2011, 02:08 PM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

Quote:
Originally Posted by grommet View Post
fuck the critics
Quote:
Originally Posted by grommet View Post
and grasshoppers in my drink, and jars with lids that won't come off and heavy stuff, and grumbly bellies, and lice, and old age, and, and... moldy cheese, except bleu cheese, but all the rest. so there.
Now on those, I agree. But do not throw your grasshopper in my soup.
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Old 07-17-2011, 08:30 PM
grommet grommet is offline
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rika View Post
Now on those, I agree. But do not throw your grasshopper in my soup.
just like croutons, really.
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Old 07-18-2011, 09:00 AM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

Well wasnt that a very impressive exchange...some folks really know how to get the most out of their words.
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Old 07-18-2011, 03:58 PM
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Re: Drawing vs sculpting-which is easier?

Quote:
Well wasnt that a very impressive exchange...some folks really know how to get the most out of their words.
And their ideas. Why do discussions always end up dealing with inane chatter about food when the topic has nothing to do with eating???
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