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  #1  
Old 06-12-2011, 09:06 PM
Adelgander Adelgander is offline
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Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

Hi all,

It's been quite a while since I posted here, with my college portfolio. I've encountered some pretty disappointing times, and I am hoping to pick the experienced sculptor's brains here to get on the right track.

Here is the situation:

Since my BFA graduation in 2009, I have not payed a dime back on the loans and other debts I acquired during those four years at SCAD in Atlanta. This seems like the least of my worries, but having a minimum wage job doesn't make the future seem any brighter, considering.

I want so badly to begin creating sculpture again, but lack the time to do so. I took my minimum wage position because of the shop access, but I can't afford materials to create anything....

I feel like I am in such a rut. I am constantly coming up with great ideas, most of which are so different and new for me, as well as for the sculpture community as a whole. I feel like my work could really resonate and change things if I had a real chance.

I have been looking into residencies, graduate schools, and even internships (despite the whole financial problem). I just want to move on to something better, but I feel trapped. I am living with my parents at home, and I feel like I am disappointing them because I have nothing planned, and nothing to really look forward to.

What is the next step? How do I save myself from this boring 9 to 5 dribble that I have unwilling prescribed to? My grand dreams of a contemporary lifestyle and work environment are slowly slipping away from me. I need a catalyst, but I really don't know where to begin.

I would really hate to think that my professors, as wonderful as they were, left me unprepared for the real world.
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  #2  
Old 06-12-2011, 09:20 PM
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adelgander View Post

I would really hate to think that my professors, as wonderful as they were, left me unprepared for the real world.
Worse than that, they are part of a system that left you in debt for the privelge, which is one reason why I have advocated for alternative approaches to learning the craft side of becoming an artist.

Don't let materials cost stop you. It does not cost much to make small scale models of your ideas. It is important that you work these out and leave them in some form, be it 2-D sketches or 3-D small models, materials for which can either be found for free or nearly so. If you are doing figurative work clay can be purchased cheaply and armature materials can be cobbled together from construction site debris.

Working out these ideas at a small scale will keep you engaged in process. You will also build up reference material that can be photographed and will be ready for if and when the right circumstance or person comes along that may provide the opportunity to go the next step.
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Old 06-12-2011, 10:32 PM
raspero raspero is offline
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

One way around the high cost of materials is to use modeling clay and plaster. Both are cheap; Dick Blick sells Klean Klay for a bit over a dollar a pound (he calls it Dick Blick Gray Modeling clay) and once you buy the clay it is yours for a very long time.

The process that comes to mind is making plaster piece molds of clay figures; then make plaster casts in those molds. Obviously it's not ideal as you have to be very careful of the mold release and the undercuts, or the mold won't release.

I like working in plaster. I have a bronze foundry but I make things in plaster too. Here is one I did a few years ago.

(I studied up on anatomy after this one, but still, I like it.)

Richard
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Old 06-12-2011, 11:02 PM
grommet grommet is offline
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

It's rough right now for many. Curious, if you have a job and are living at your parent's home, where is the money going???

free sculpture materials: steel- those political signs that appear on people's lawns are a great source of rod. the neighbors might even give you stuff from their garage. fallen limbs and other stuff gathered on trash day or at the dump. dirt, blown out tires from the freeway. scrap from transmission shops. ( politeness and explanations go a long way)

Look around, artists are resourceful and respond to their circumstances. designing something and then figuring out how to get the funds to do it is one way, but there are many other ways. If it's important to you, it will happen. pick up some crud and just start making stuff. You will feel better and have more energy. hang in there.
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Old 06-12-2011, 11:06 PM
Adelgander Adelgander is offline
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

Thanks for the quick replies!

I suppose I do take for granted a lot of 'cheaper' materials I could use. More importantly, its after I make the work that I really worry about.

Having a safe place to put these things in the interim, or having them placed in a gallery seems like a formidable task in itself.

At this stage in my career, I am finding it difficult to promote myself. Name dropping at galleries, and submitting hard copy portfolios feels a little... forceful. I would really like to get going on actually putting my work 'out there'.

But once again, the professional practice side of being an artist is lost on me, as it is on potentially all fine art graduates out in the world without a clue. Is it really as easy as calling a gallery and asking them their policy on reviewing new artists?
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Old 06-12-2011, 11:10 PM
Adelgander Adelgander is offline
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

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Originally Posted by grommet View Post
It's rough right now for many. Curious, if you have a job and are living at your parent's home, where is the money going???

I have struggled with finding an answer to this question myself, and I keep coming around to the fact I just don't make enough. My weekly paycheck is usually just at $200 or a little under. So after a trip to the grocery and the gas station, I am out of money, hahaha. I can't imagine what it would be like if I didn't have family to lean on, I could be sitting on a street curb next to a guy with a p.h.d.
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Old 06-12-2011, 11:11 PM
grommet grommet is offline
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

maybe start here.
http://www.amazon.com/Id-Rather-Stud...p/0974272582#_
perhaps the library has it?
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Last edited by grommet : 06-12-2011 at 11:53 PM.
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  #8  
Old 06-13-2011, 01:35 AM
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

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Originally Posted by Adelgander View Post
My grand dreams of a contemporary lifestyle and work environment are slowly slipping away from me. I need a catalyst, but I really don't know where to begin.
The only catalyst is only going to be your need to see your ideas come to fruition...not a "contemporary lifestyle/work environment."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adelgander View Post
I would really hate to think that my professors, as wonderful as they were, left me unprepared for the real world.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GlennT View Post
Worse than that, they are part of a system that left you in debt for the privelge, which is one reason why I have advocated for alternative approaches to learning the craft side of becoming an artist.
Your professors were never charged with preparing you for the real world.
That's all on you. Students, (especially art students) shouldn't just enter a program wanting to be molded and prodded along incrementally.

And Glenn...Please correct me if I'm wrong as I veer off from the focus just a but, but were you ever a student at the type of university, (let alone an art program) you continually rail against? You have this vague idea of what it means to attend a university that exists as some hippie/liberal free-for-all that undermines all of your moral, socio-political and artistic leanings. I've just wondered about your uni experience(s) that led you to these criticisms...As cheesepaws touched upon in another thread-- Universities contain administrators, instructors and students all of whom encapsulate a range of hyper-liberal and hyper-conservative mindsets. It's up to the student to filter as needed... I do agree with some of your misgivings about university art programs, but not to the point of dismissing them outright.

On material costs, Glenn is dead-on about not allowing material costs to stop you. Let industriousness and improvisation reign.

Quote:
Originally Posted by grommet View Post

free sculpture materials: steel- those political signs that appear on people's lawns are a great source of rod. the neighbors might even give you stuff from their garage. fallen limbs and other stuff gathered on trash day or at the dump. dirt, blown out tires from the freeway. scrap from transmission shops. ( politeness and explanations go a long way)
Yep, knowing how to communicate your need to those overseeing your scrap bounty goes a long, long way. Knowing how to interface with galleries and other artists isn't the end of it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adelgander View Post
I have struggled with finding an answer to this question myself, and I keep coming around to the fact I just don't make enough. My weekly paycheck is usually just at $200 or a little under. So after a trip to the grocery and the gas station, I am out of money, hahaha. I can't imagine what it would be like if I didn't have family to lean on, I could be sitting on a street curb next to a guy with a p.h.d.
You've got to make a distinct decision to come up with a basic plan of attack, and at least, commit to some general goals in mind...One important thing I've learned is not to rush/force things.
After all, you're only two years removed from your BFA.

Last edited by obseq : 06-13-2011 at 07:35 AM.
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Old 06-13-2011, 07:37 AM
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

200 buck a week? That sound way below minimum wage to me. Got to get a better crappy job than that.

There will be very cheap space in the worst part of town. These areas have always served artists very well. You must get your OWN "place" to work (and so you live there too, amongst your art-stuff) . This is of primary importance. And as Grommet said, there are materials out there to be scavenged aplenty. No excuse there. That scavenging merely has to become part of your creative process; as important as the crafting and conceptualizing and composing.

Never blame anyone else for your inability to make art (or "succeed" there-in); hopefully you didnt enter into art for a career. You make art IN SPITE of a career. It (the making) might yet intertwine with other parts of your life and BE a career - or YIELD like a career OR it might outfit you for parallel opportunities that you could not have imagined had you not plowed through the resistance and persevered.

I would say you NEED to go the grad school...there will be folks there (students AND professors) who might awaken you to the REAL reason for making art - and once THAT has been internalized, the regular struggles seem easy...you will learn there how to negotiate the mountains of adversity that will be trying to stop you from applying your creativity in purity. (plus there are tools and gear to be borrowed in school as well). But It must begin with some interesting thoughts...and proceed from there with great will.
Money is the easiest and most obvious thing in the world to complain about. Art only happens when the least obvious and MOST difficult things are being addressed.

Last edited by evaldart : 06-13-2011 at 07:48 AM.
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  #10  
Old 06-13-2011, 08:01 AM
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

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Originally Posted by evaldart View Post
200 buck a week? That sound way below minimum wage to me. Got to get a better crappy job than that.
In his post, he mentioned that the with the crappy job came shop access...That kills me to read that!!!
You should be camping out there after your nightly scavenging sessions for free materials. You've got rent covered, free work space, and very nominal cash flow.
Difficult to see any logistical roadblocks to any art-making.

Oh, and what materials are you trying to afford?

Last edited by obseq : 06-13-2011 at 08:42 AM.
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Old 06-13-2011, 09:47 AM
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

Quote:
obseq
And Glenn...Please correct me if I'm wrong as I veer off from the focus just a but, but were you ever a student at the type of university, (let alone an art program) you continually rail against? You have this vague idea of what it means to attend a university that exists as some hippie/liberal free-for-all that undermines all of your moral, socio-political and artistic leanings. I've just wondered about your uni experience(s) that led you to these criticisms...
I attended three state universities in my pursuit of an architecture degree, two in Illinois and one in Minnesota. In between the two in Illinois I took a couple years off to work, which was helpful to get out of the mindset you grow up with of school, school, school for a continuous 20 years of life.

This was quite some time ago, and I have heard enough stories to know that the indocrtination element in college has gotten worse since then. One example I can cite from my experience was an "architectural" course called "An ecological basis for planning" which sounded to me like it would involve learning how best to relate site design to specific landform environments. "Great stuff", I thought. Instead, it was a sociology class disquised as an architecture class whose reading list included "The Population Bomb" and "Limits to Growth", and others, all full of some of the most vitriolic left wing hysteria you could ever come across, with the usual doomsday predictions that of course never happened, and as usual now consequences for trying to scare people with lies and hysteria, because being liberal means never having to say you're sorry when you are wrong.

For my class presentation I did a huge amount of research debunking and exposing the myths presented from Malthus through Maragert Sanger down to origins of this class from research grants by the Rockefellers and others, and my presentation was so complete and well researched that the teacher was stunned and speechless, and ended up quitting after that semester and the class was not taught again while I was there.

There was also a (properly labeled) sociology class I took that was so disgusting that at one point in a large lecture hall I got up and shouted, "That's an outright lie!" Also, on the final exam, I pointed out how none of the "models for social behavior" that we were supposed to select one from as the best and write an essay about were of any value. I just wrote about how each of them were bogus. To the teachers credit, I got an A in that class and even was invited to join the sociology club! (Maybe they have kool-aid parties!) But I declined.

There was another class or two where my challenging the professors did not lead to bad grades. In that era, being outspoken if demonstrating a grasp of the material was a good thing. But I have heard many more recent stories of outspoken conservative students being castigated for their views and recieving failling grades. Do you happen to remember the Harvard Dean who was pillorized for actually suggesting that male and female brains might have a difference in how science and math is perceived and learned? Or the Northwestern professor who brought couples into to his classroom to perform live sex acts involving sex toys as part of his instruction? (The resulting outrage led to this consequence: nothing. He is tenured protected and still there)

I could bore you with more such stories. And I could also point to classes, mostly in the basic sciences or engineering, that had no political basis or bias whatsoever.

A very important point was that after receiving my degree and going to work at an architecture firm, I discovered that my education had woefully unprepared me to do the work that I was called upon to do at the firm. In retrospect I saw the University approach to architecture schooling as largely a scam to extract 4-5 years of large sums of money from students ( not to mention the expensive textbooks scam) and give them little in return other than weeding out people who couldn't take the stress of the shit-load of classes and pressures needed to pass. Further, each time I transferred schools, I lost ground because certain credits were not accepted. Why would that be, unless they wanted to keep me in school longer and extract more money? These were all "good" architecture schools, they should have accepted the credits taken and accomplished elsewhere.


Although this was architecture school, not art school, many years later I audited a university art class to learn etching, met students, and got a feel for what was going on. Plus, I have gone through and observed studios and student work at a major art school here.

And finally, to compare to these experiences, I visted the Taleisin Architecture school to see how things can be done well and right to properly prepare one to problem solve intelligently and work in the real world, and I took 1 1 /2 years of incredibly valueable art training at an Atelier and saw the difference between a serious place for learning art (at a fraction of the cost) versus the university approach.
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Old 06-13-2011, 10:27 AM
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

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I would say you NEED to go the grad school...there will be folks there (students AND professors) who might awaken you to the REAL reason for making art
If you need more school to wake you up "to the REAL reason for making art" you are not a natural and I doubt that its the field for you. Being one of the toughest to make a living in, you've gotta love it, need it, and be ready to sacrifice big time for it.

Quote:
I feel like I am in such a rut. I am constantly coming up with great ideas, most of which are so different and new for me, as well as for the sculpture community as a whole. I feel like my work could really resonate and change things if I had a real chance.
What do you mean by chance? You're living at home and have income. Sounds like you lack motivation and gumption.
Quote:
My grand dreams of a contemporary lifestyle and work environment are slowly slipping away from me. I need a catalyst, but I really don't know where to begin.
The catalyst is your dedication to hard work.
Quote:
I have nothing planned, and nothing to really look forward to.
I don't need to repeat myself .
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Old 06-13-2011, 10:30 AM
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

Glenn, you are easily (self)aware enough NOT to be intimidated by the range of exchanges that occur in the academic environment. Yes, it is a passive environment, yes can be a bit coddling - BUT in the drudge of the "real" world you will be hard-pressed to add much vitality to your think. It often requires intellectual antagonists, provocateurs and opponents to inflame the changes that are necessary throughout an art life. Yes, you can read - but that is one-sided. What is more likely to happen is that you will align with mass-propoganda (left, right, conservative, orthodox, cults, parties, congregations, cliques, teams and constituencies) that will lead you to their sameness. And sameness is an art killer.
And there is NOTHING better than critical/original thought to prepare you for WHATEVER you will be doing with your existence. Nothing. The academic environment is, theoretically, FOR this. Although I am distressed to see university curriculums deteriorating into trade schools; only ABOUT preparing student for a J-O-B. And jobs suck, the lot.
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Old 06-13-2011, 11:15 AM
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

[quote=evaldart;98928]
And there is NOTHING better than critical/original thought to prepare you for WHATEVER you will be doing with your existence. Nothing. The academic environment is, theoretically, FOR this. QUOTE]

Yes, "theoretically" is indeed the operative word here. That used to be what one could expect in higher education. Unfortunately, the university system is far from being the place for it currently. In the main, orignal thought is restricted to a leftist world view and there is often a zero tolerence policy, unwritten but in effect, for thoughts and opinions that oppose those views.
"Hate speech" is banned, and the definition of "hate speech" is basically if you have Christian conservative opinions and are foolish enough to voice them.

At the undergraduate level, the tendancy of the student body is to absorb, not to challenge. The pressure to keep good grades keeps most people from challenging the status quo of what is being taught. I found myself to be an exception when I returned to college fresh from the REAL world with new ideas and perspectives. I did not care about grades and professors teachings as much as I cared for arriving at the truth of the matters at hand. So I spoke out when I found professors abusing the trust of their students by teaching or promoting lies. I was the pretty much the only one doing that, although after class some other students would introduce themselves and become friends because they liked what I said. And more often than not these would be students who had come here from other countries, where maybe they had not been given the same world view since grade school.

The greatest amount of original thought in an academic setting that I have found was at the Atelier, where artists were being trained by artists to learn the craft of art, and there were no grades or final exams. It opened my mind largely to learn about much that was entirely neglected in art history books and classes I took at the universities. There was as much political and other dioversity there as anywhre else, but it was not part of any agenda, and in fact there were no classes that were a waste of time. I even taught an architecture class while going there, because some students wanted to learn what I had to offer. Imagine something like that happening at a university! It would never happen!
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Old 06-13-2011, 01:28 PM
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

there's something for everyone. Glenn found his niche outside the university system, Evaldart within, both by pushing at the limits of what they saw. Nothing comes without effort is the lesson. If you can push the boundaries without slamming everyone not on your side, you'll have more couches to sleep on on your national art tour extraveganza.
Get a better crummy job and keep making art any way you can if it matters. If not, get a great job and forget about the art for a while. It will return as a gnawing in your gut if it must.
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Old 06-13-2011, 01:50 PM
Adelgander Adelgander is offline
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

Ha. I see I sort of started a debate here, though it seems to have nothing to do with my topic. Interesting back and forth though.

I hope I didn't make it seem like I am not motivated to work, because a lot of the comments here picked out a few select words (of my own) that would allude to poor work ethic. I admit, this situation is a little more difficult to produce work than it was when I had everything all in one place at school. But that is in no way an excuse to be idle, and you are all very correct in scolding me for that. Thank you!

But I should make it clear that once I start on something, I finish it quickly, and correctly to my exact specification. I have sat in my small room and made wire frames with flux wire and an exhaust fan in the window.... MAKING is not the issue, in any way.

The guess work for me right now is what to DO with that work after it has been made. I live in a fairly art driven city in Kentucky, but sculpture (let alone contemporary sculpture and installation) is in scarce supply.

Obseq: The materials I am trying to afford are probably out of reach for now. The usual steel/ wood etc. I can find scrap or otherwise is very viable for my budget. I have been making plans for work that involves kinetic, electronic, and sensory functions lately... Motors and chains, pulleys... maybe I just need to keep it simple and be more "Formalist" for the time being.

Evaldart: I really don't mean to place 'blame' per se on anyone other than myself for lack of success, especially considering I haven't really given it everything I have yet. I suppose it just would have been nice to have a rough step-by-step guideline for how to make it doing this in addition to a JOB. I think of my sculpture as the real job, and the part time thing as a temporary agreement.

jOe~: I agree with you about not using more school to find direction. I know WHY I make my work, and How I go about it. If I went to school, it would be to get the degree. I'm sure there is a ton of stuff I could learn, but at the end of the day my drive would dictate the value of that program, and what work/ experience I would get out of it. It would just have to be as close to free as possible
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Old 06-13-2011, 02:54 PM
Adelgander Adelgander is offline
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

But to gear this toward a more constructive conversation, I would like to post my work page from my website. This is the type of work I made in my most recent series. I think it may be a bit removed from what would *sell*, but it is what I have a passion for. Being really mixed medium, having a lot of content beyond the visual aesthetic.

I like to think of my work as being a critical but 'helpful' allegory of certain aspects of society pertaining to government, politics, education, culture, etc. I have already had somewhat of a critique here on this work, but suggestions in the direction of how I could exhibit this sort of work would be really helpful.

http://www.sculptwig.yolasite.com
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Old 06-13-2011, 03:50 PM
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

It's unfortunate that you too, allowed yourself to get caught up in the 'illusion' that you can making a 'living with Art' straight out of college. In the real world, you need a real job to support your 'art habit'. So, you better start now to find a way to make money. Do not feel that you have to 'create now' because you will loose your creativity, if you do anything else.
Back in the early 70's I made that same mistake, also. Luckily, my father had given me the opportunity to 'apprentice' in his Machine Shop, while I was attending college. So I quickly found a paying job. I worked on my welded steel sculptures on the weekends and in my spare time. You would be surprised how much 'more creative' you can get when you have the money to buy supplies. Now, 50+ years later, I have retired from a good paying job, and returned to my passion of creating sculptures. During all the years that I was working, I slowly collected all the equipment that is now in my studio. Now, the fun has begun.
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Old 06-13-2011, 04:02 PM
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

Welcome to the real world, only one piece of advice from me and itís to "just do it" anything from whatever material you can afford or find. If you start with something it will lead to something else and better, but if you donít start soon whatever is in your imagination will remain there forever. Good luck with your adventure.
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Old 06-13-2011, 09:34 PM
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

Quote:
Originally Posted by GlennT View Post
I attended three state universities in my pursuit of an architecture degree, two in Illinois and one in Minnesota. In between the two in Illinois I took a couple years off to work, which was helpful to get out of the mindset you grow up with of school, school, school for a continuous 20 years of life.

There was also a (properly labeled) sociology class I took that was so disgusting that at one point in a large lecture hall I got up and shouted, "That's an outright lie!" Also, on the final exam, I pointed out how none of the "models for social behavior" that we were supposed to select one from as the best and write an essay about were of any value. I just wrote about how each of them were bogus. To the teachers credit, I got an A in that class and even was invited to join the sociology club! (Maybe they have kool-aid parties!) But I declined.

Although this was architecture school, not art school, many years later I audited a university art class to learn etching, met students, and got a feel for what was going on. Plus, I have gone through and observed studios and student work at a major art school here.

And finally, to compare to these experiences, I visted the Taleisin Architecture school to see how things can be done well and right to properly prepare one to problem solve intelligently and work in the real world, and I took 1 1 /2 years of incredibly valueable art training at an Atelier and saw the difference between a serious place for learning art (at a fraction of the cost) versus the university approach.
I apologize for my assumption that you didn't attend a university. It always seemed clear that you eschewed that particular type of education...and I'm pretty sure I've only read of your experiences at ateliers and the sort.
Good on you for opening your yap and calling out the professor on the lie!
You probably should have taken up the sociology club on their offer; kept them on their heels a bit... I don't think you should have left school though.
Take the BS in stride, raise challenges when you need to, laugh it off, and move on.
.
.
.
I do think that it would be more grating to stay in a less-than-hospitable atelier/private art-school atmosphere though. The insulation at hand is magnified exponentially compared to a university environment.
Having been through both, (very large public uni and developing my body of work with a foundry, learning everything about casting, for the last 6+ years) both definitely have their significant drawbacks.

Thanks, btw, Glenn for the detailed reply.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jOe~ View Post
...you've gotta love it, need it, and be ready to sacrifice big time for it.
The catalyst is your dedication to hard work.
I don't need to repeat myself .
Joe hits the nail on the head here. All other considerations are incidental to your art-making.

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Originally Posted by evaldart View Post
Glenn, you are easily (self)aware enough NOT to be intimidated by the range of exchanges that occur in the academic environment.
My thought exactly!

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Originally Posted by grommet View Post
there's something for everyone. Glenn found his niche outside the university system, Evaldart within, both by pushing at the limits of what they saw. Nothing comes without effort is the lesson.
I think a combination of the two sensibilities works really well...But like grommet said, effort is key...You have to know what to keep and what to discard where the lessons are concerned.

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Originally Posted by Adelgander View Post
Ha. I see I sort of started a debate here, though it seems to have nothing to do with my topic. Interesting back and forth though.
While some of the exchanges appear to be superfluously anecdotal, they have everything to do with your topic.
You, in so many words, are expressing that a system has failed to adequately prepare you, and right now, you're mired in some sort of limbo....so, we're discussing the system(s) at hand.


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Originally Posted by The Forge View Post
It's unfortunate that you too, allowed yourself to get caught up in the 'illusion' that you can making a 'living with Art' straight out of college.
Exactly. It's a can be a very precipitous and slow ascent to your goals...
Sure, money plays a part of it, but the key variable is your level of sacrifice and commitment. I'm still slowly on my way as I've taken a non-traditional path into committing to art-making, (let alone sculpture) but you're either going to be masochistically single-minded about this or you're not.

As I mentioned above: You're two years removed, so don't panic.
If you can't quite figure stuff out RIGHT NOW, save some money and travel, look at art and only strive to topple your perspective.

Last edited by obseq : 06-14-2011 at 08:35 AM.
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  #21  
Old 06-13-2011, 09:55 PM
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Ries Ries is offline
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

Methinks you dost complain just a bit too much- If you have worked with both Craig and Corinna- (and say hi to both of em for me the next time you see em), you are already a bit beyond the typical minimum wage job.

You have gotten a window into what it takes to make a living as an artist- and that is, A LOT OF WORK.

Me, I would not recommend graduate school, unless its free. And, often, it is- I know a fair amount of people who have gotten TA positions, and scholarships, to the point where their MFA was basically free.

But what you really need to do is work. make art, and then make more art. show, where ever, and whenever, you can. in bars, in coffee shops, in invitational shows, enter stuff online at CAFE, just make lots and lots of stuff, and get it out there however you can.

And, as a sculptor, buy tools. Tools can earn you far more money than minimum wage- make things for architects, build pieces for artists who cant do it themselves, in general just take advantage of the fact that 90% of the population just sits at keyboards and cant even change a battery.

But most important, make art.
What separates the artists from the art students is not genius, or great talent, or even ideas- its elbow grease and perseverance.
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Old 06-13-2011, 09:56 PM
Mack Mack is offline
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Smile Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

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Originally Posted by Adelgander View Post
But to gear this toward a more constructive conversation, I would like to post my work page from my website. This is the type of work I made in my most recent series. I think it may be a bit removed from what would *sell*, but it is what I have a passion for. Being really mixed medium, having a lot of content beyond the visual aesthetic.

I like to think of my work as being a critical but 'helpful' allegory of certain aspects of society pertaining to government, politics, education, culture, etc. I have already had somewhat of a critique here on this work, but suggestions in the direction of how I could exhibit this sort of work would be really helpful.

http://www.sculptwig.yolasite.com
I've thought a bit about what you've said here and it brings up some questions: You see yourself as a "critic" of sorts of society. I imagine that you think that your criticisms of the 'human condition' (our condition) are valuable (and they well may be) and that your artworks reflect those ideas. But why should anyone 'Pay' you to tell us how f**cked up we are? Who is it in this 'Artworld' who decrees that, "you are an artist who should be recognised above the others"?
I really don't know how this all works and those 'artists' who have 'made it bigtime' are certainly not posting here... I like the work of yours that i've seen and as far as I'm concerned you are right up there with anyone I've seen, but what do I know?
So...get some stuff together, have a show at a prestigious gallery, get a review in the Times that says you are best thing since the BLT, and you, my friend, will be on your merry, lucrative, way. I think it's as simple as that.

Last edited by Mack : 06-13-2011 at 10:01 PM. Reason: cross my eyes and part my hair
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Old 06-13-2011, 10:55 PM
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

Everybody's a critic.

Just have a show.
Doesnt matter if its at a "prestigious gallery", whatever the hell that is.

Find an empty storefront, find out who owns it, tell the owner that art shows will help make the neighborhood more desirable, and rents will go up, if he lets you have it for a month for fifty bucks.

Get 4 friends, put on a show.

Start a co-op gallery.

Make guerilla pieces, screw em onto abandoned buildings.

Take some pictures of the work you already made.
Put together a blurb book, 30 or 40 bucks, go down to Art Basel Miami this year, and show everybody who will stand still your book

Frank Zappa used to like to quote Edgar Varese, who said, "the present day composer refuses to die"- well, the present day artist just makes stuff, and shoves it out into the world.
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Old 06-14-2011, 08:41 AM
Mack Mack is offline
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

The "prestigious gallery" line was meant as irony..the point is that you don't get to get into a "prestigious gallery" until you've been 'annointed' by whoever it is that does the 'annointing' these days...of course Ries is right: make Art and put it in front of as many people you can. Do it intelligently and maybe one day you can quit your day job or find a 'patron'...do they still have those?
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Old 06-14-2011, 08:48 AM
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Re: Lost in Monotony: After college dilemma

I was with a "prestigious" gallery once...I was never annointed. I had no connections, knew nobody of significance - the WORK got me there, somehow. And then the lack of sales got me out of there. So it goes.

Yes, sculptors are the MOST likely artmakers to be able to make money at will. Because of their ability to build, construct, fasten...design/fab/install "things" in the physical world. One sculptor can do what it takes many to do regarding the accomplishing of a unique task. So there will always be a "job" if you want/need one. Always.
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