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  #1  
Old 06-10-2012, 11:04 PM
rika rika is offline
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Simulated honey

An impossibility? I think so, but I thought I'd ask anyways because this was the reason I made the piece, I imagined honey flowing down from the top of her head into the bucket(s). I find it difficult to let go of this idea.

I experimented on a test piece with coloured resin which ended up in disappointment. I used Easy Cast Clear Casting Epoxy resin. The problem was it didn't harden enough to have the consistency of honey, it ran like oil even after an hour. Then it became unmanageable and foggy. I am wondering if it's possible to speed up the hardening process by adding more hardener to the mix than the recommended 1:1. I cannot afford to waste much more material on this so I thought I'd ask if anybody tried this.

Also: is there another alternative that could be used instead of resin?
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  #2  
Old 06-11-2012, 03:20 AM
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mantrid mantrid is offline
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Re: Simulated honey

The only way I can see of doing this is to model the honey in wax or clay and make a silicone mould of it then cast the resin in the mould.

Adding more hardener will speed up the setting time but not fast enough to stop the resin running off first.
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Old 06-11-2012, 07:56 AM
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Re: Simulated honey

Simulate the "honey" drip look with a medium you like to work with ( clay, wax,etc.) right on the piece. As was suggested, remove it from the sculpture and mold it. Then you can cast whatever looks best to you into the mold, remove that and attach it to the sculpture. (paper mache'?). If you have a re-usable mold, you can experiment with different materials to see which looks best.
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Old 06-11-2012, 08:46 AM
rika rika is offline
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Re: Simulated honey

Yes, Mack, it's paper mache.

I think I need to show what is the idea is on my test piece.



I don't think it can be cast, it has to look naturally dripping. Maybe I'll give it another shot by adding more hardener and see what happens.
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  #5  
Old 06-11-2012, 08:57 AM
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evaldart evaldart is offline
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Re: Simulated honey

You can thicken the resin right away by mixing in an additive, usually a fumesilica (fine powdery substance designed for that purpose). It may effect the clarity/pigmenting but you will only need a tiny bit to get it to a honey thickness.
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Old 06-11-2012, 09:04 AM
rika rika is offline
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Re: Simulated honey

Thank you, E, that sounds promising.
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  #7  
Old 06-11-2012, 09:32 AM
PTsideshow PTsideshow is offline
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Re: Simulated honey

smooth-on
You will find this site a wealth of information on the use and mis use of the products. They also have a forum that may have somebody that over came something similar to yours.
Most of other sites that sell this kind of products, re brand them.

another great one


alumilite
They have great assorted hardening time materials another forum that might have your answer.

You might also look for the material that is used for diorama water falls, water in rapids etc. model railroads etc.

micromark
If you mix the dye with one of the material then add the other stir and wait till it starts you can achieve the effect, but you will have to do it in small batches so it will set up as you wish. That being said experiment on something else first!
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glen
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  #8  
Old 06-12-2012, 07:11 AM
rika rika is offline
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Re: Simulated honey

Thank you Glen, I'll take a look at all of them.
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  #9  
Old 06-12-2012, 09:41 AM
PTsideshow PTsideshow is offline
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Re: Simulated honey

another item came to mind, from a question on another forum.
they make the counter top coatings might have to wait till it starts to set up but in small batches it also may fit the bill and some is yellow in color. Alot of the two part decopogé stuff tends to yellow darker with age as does some of the fiber glass resins.
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glen
been there done that !
I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
All the usual
and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only
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  #10  
Old 06-12-2012, 01:51 PM
EJB EJB is offline
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Re: Simulated honey

Casting is the best bet but require great skill at making it look right. Chances are good that you will not get the form of 'flow' in one shot of a direct pour of fluid. You might consider building onto some kind of transparent support like a monofilament, plastic rod or straw, adding successive layers of resin until you achieve the full form. Obviously the thinner your material, the more layers required. In other words, build it up like a stalactite.
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