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Old 11-28-2015, 01:37 AM
Art-Deco Art-Deco is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 399
Sculptors using others to carve for them

While searching for old stone column photos being turned on lathes, I found a stone quarry and stone works page with some interesting photos. One photo was of a couple of carvers working on a stone lion in the UK about 1925 for a war memorial, wondering about the finished product I searched and found a pic of the granite lion in place. Interesting is how it was made in 3 pieces instead of the single pieces the pair of lions this size were made for the Public Library in NYC.

The old photo shows them using a pointing machine.

The carver in the rear is matching up his end of the pointing rod to his carving, the full master model was probably plaster. The carver in the rear was working on the rear half of the lion, which on the modern view of it the seam line down the midsection can be faintly seen. The head's separate section can be clearly seen in both pics.
The actual artist W. McMillan died at age 50, just 2 years after the lion was installed, odd thing is with these famous sculptors- they didn't actually do much of their own carving at all, they simply handed that over to studio assistants or in this case- a firm who did the carving for hire, so then is the sculpture REALLY his work at all, or is it actually the work of these two quarry carvers James Philip, with his assistant George Cooper!?

The carver, James Philip, spent his working life in the granite yard of Arthur Taylor granite works, and he was perhaps the best carver ever employed in the City’s stone trade.
Nonetheless, it was McMillan who claimed all the credit for the sculpture even though he clearly had no actual hand in the physical carving of the granite block himself.

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